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A 

CONCISE HISTORY 

OF THE 

Kehukee Baptist Association* 

From its original rise to the present time. 

Wherein are shown its first Constitution,* Increase, Numbers, 
- Principles, Form of Government, Decorum, Revolutions 
that Association has passed through, Revivats, Minis* 
ters, Churches, Confession of Faith, Times and Pla- 
ces when and where Associations have been hoi- 
den. Queries and their Answers; and al! other 
useful Articles relative to Church History, 

IN TWO PARTS. 

BY ELDER JOSEPH BIGGS, 

Pastor of the Baptist Church at Skeivarkey, 



"Thus saith the Lord, stand ye in the ways, and see, and 
ask for the old paths, where is the good way, and walk there- 
in, and ye shall find rest for your souls." — Jeremiah. 



PART I. Contains the History of the Kehukee As- 
sociation, from its first organization until 1803, as 
compiled by Elders Burkitt and Read, Ministers of 
the gospel in Northampton and Halifax counties, 
N. Carolina, (omitting the history of the churches.) 

PART II. Embraces a continuation of the History 
of the Association until the present time, (together 
with a history of the churches now in the Associa- 
tion,) by Elder Joseph Biggs, under the supervision 
of a Committee appointed by the Association. 



FRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY GEORGE HOWARD, 

Office ofiht Tarborough (N. C) Free Press. 

1834, 









&?3fg/d 






Introduction, - Page 7. 

Preface contains — 1. The use of History. 2. Nature 
of a gospel church and the manner of gathering the 
same. % Reasons for particular communion, Sec. 

CHAP. I. Page 27. 

The state of the Churches at first, before they were 
united in an Association at all. 2. The revolution 
those churches passed through before they became 
an established Association. 3. The form of a church 
covenant, and the plan on which they were estab- 
lished. 4. Biographical Sketches of some of those 
ministers, who died before the establishment of 
the Association on its present order. 

CHAP. II. Page 34. 

I. The revolution the Association passed through be- 
fore established on the present plan. 2. Her or- 
ganization at the Falls of Tar River, and the prin- 
ciples on which she is founded, adopted at Sappo- 
ny, in Sussex county, Virginia; and afterwards pub- 
lished by order of the Association held at Whit- 
field's meeting house, Pitt county, North Carolina, 
October, 1789. 3. Biographical Sketches of Elder 
James Bell. 4^Persecution of Elder John Tanner. 
CHAP. III. Page St. 

I. Some of the proceedings of the Association, and 
remarkable events that took place from the year 
1778, until 1785. 2. The Decorum or Rules by 
which the Association is governed, when made and 
adopted, and the Rules at large. 3. The nature of 
a Minister's call to the office of the ministry, and 
the manner of his ordination. 4. Biographical 
sketches of Elder Jeremiah Dargan, who departed 
this life the 25th of December, 1786. 

CHAP. IV. Page 70. 

I. Proceedings of the Association untir 1789. 2. Pro- 
ceedings of the Association at Whitfield's meeting 
house. The junction of the Regular Baptist chur- 
ches with us, and the names to be buried in obli- 
vion; and the Association to be hereafter known by 



IV CONTENTS. 

the name of the "United Baptist Association." & 
The constitution of the Association, and form of 
government. 4. Proceedings until the division took 
place at Davis's meeting house in 1790. 5. Re- 
marks on the division. 6. Biographical sketches 
©f Elders Samuel Harrel and Henry Abbot. 

CHAP. V. Page 89. 

I. Proceedings of the Association until the division 
took place between the Kehukee and Neuse Asso- 
ciations, concluded on at the Association holden at 
Skewarkey, in October, 1793. Proceedings con- 
tinued until 1796. 2. Biographical sketches of El- 
der John Page, Jonathan Barnes, and brother Josh- 
ua Freeman. 3. A few remarks on itinerant prea- 
ching. 4. The Association fund. 

CHAP. VI. ' Page 99. 

I. Proceedings of -the Association until 1802. 2. Bio- 
graphical sketches of Elder John Meglamre, and 
brother Elisha Battle, who departed this life in 1799. 

CHAP. VII. Page 109. 

I. The happy revival which took place in the chur- 
ches belonging to the Kehukee Association in 1802 
and 1803. 2. Means which the Lord blessed in the 
revival. 3. Constitution of an Union Meeting. 

CHAP. VIII. Page 123. 

I. On the nature of Circular Letters. 2. A Letter "on 
the maintenance of the ministry," for 1791, by Ei- 
der Martin Ross. 3. "On the final perseverance of 
the saints in grace," for 1794, by Elder Lancaster. 
4. "On good works," for 1800, by Elder Gilbert. 

CHAP. IX. Page 140. 

J. What a true church of Christ is, the manner of 
receiving members, constitution, discipline, offi- 
cers, 6cc. 2. Memoirs of Elders Done, Cole, Wal- 
ker, and Crocker. 

CHAP. X. Page 151. 

I. Frost, an Armenian Baptist preacher, stricken with 
death while preaching his sentiments. 2. Persecu- 
tion of Elders Barrow, Mintz, Walker, and Baker. 
3. Biographical sketches of Col. Nathan Bryan. 4, 
Conclusion. 



^AHLW II. 

CHAP. T. Page 15p 

I. Proceedings of the Association at Conoho, in 1803. 

2. Sketch of the proceedings in relation to the Mis>- 
sionary and Other inventions of the day. 3. Pro- 
ceedings at Parker's meeting house, in 1*804. 4. At 
Daniel's meeting house, in 1805 — Division of the 
Association. 5. Proceedings at Skewarkey, in 1806. 
6. At Haywood's meeting house, in 1807. 

CHAP. II. Page 175 

I. Proceedings of the Association at Cross Roads, in 
1808— Biography of Elder James McCabe. 2. Pro- 
ceedings at Morattock, in 1809 — Biography of El- 
der Nathan Gilbert. 3. Proceedings at Kehukee, 
in 1810. 

CHAP. IN. Page 186 

I. Proceedings of the Association at Mearn's Chapel, 
in 181 1. 2. At Great Swamp, in 1812— Biography 
of Col. Nathan Mayo. 5. Proceedings at Wil- 
liams's meeting house, in 1813. 4. At Morattock, 
in 1814. 

CHAP. IV. Page 19tf 

1. Proceedings of the Association at Daniel's meet- 
ing house, in 1815. 2. At Conoho, in 1816 — Biog- 
raphy of Elder John Bowin. 3. Proceedings at the 
Falls of Tar River, in 1817. 

CHAP. V. Page 209 

I. Proceedings of the Association at Skewarkey, in 
1818. 2. At Deep Creek, in 1819— Biography of 
Elder Jonathan Cherry. 3. Proceedings at North 
Creek, in 1820. At Mearn's Chapel, in 1821. 

CHAP. VI. Page 221 

I. Proceedings of the Association at Cross Roads, in_ 
1822. 2. At Lawrence's meeting house, in 1823. 

3. At Great Swamp, in 1824. 4. At the Falls oi 
Tar River, in 1825. 5. At Skewarkey, in 1826— 
Biography of Elder Jeremiah Mastin. 

CHAP. VII. Page23S 

f. Proceedings of the Association at Kehukee, in 

1827. 2. At North Creek, in 1828— Biography of 



VI 0ONTENT& 

Elder Amariah Biggs. 3. Proceedings at Conetoe^ 
in 1829 — Declaration respecting Missionary and 
Bible Societies, Theological Seminaries, &c. 4. 
Proceedings at Morattock, in 1830. 

CHAP'. VIII. Page 252: 

I. Proceedings of the Association at Flat Swamp, in- 
1831 — Biography of Elder James Ambrose. 2. 
Proceedings at Conoho, in 1832. S. At the Falls of 
Tar River, in 1833. 

A Table of Churches, Page 268 

CHAP. IX. Page 27(* 

History of the Churches, viz: Bear Grass, Blount's 
Creek, Cowenjock, Conoho, Conetoe, Conccrd, Cross 
Roads, Cedar Island, Deep Creek, Falls of Tar 
River, Flat Swamp, Frying Pan, Goose Creek, 
Great Swamp, Hunting Quarters, Kehukee, Law- 
rence's meeting house, and Little Alligator. 

CHAP. X. Page 284 

Continuation of the History of the Churches, viz: Mo- 
rattock, North Creek, North Mattamuskeet, OicT 
Ford, Picot meeting house, Powell's Point, Pungo, 
Scuppernong, South Mattamuskeet, Skewarkey,. 
Smithwick's Creek, Sound Side, Spring Green, 
Tarborough, Washington, WhjUe Plains, Wil- 
liams's meeting house. 

Subscribers' Names, Page 29S 



The undersigned was appointed by the Ke^. 
iiukee Association, at its session held at Morat- 
lock meeting house in 1830, to write a continua- 
tion of its History from the termination of the 
one published by Elders Burkitt and Read, and 
Elders Joshua Lawrence, William Hyman, Green 
Carrowan, Micajah Ambrose, and William , B. 
Worrell, were appointed a committee to collect 
such necessary information as might be within 
their reach, and the churches were requested to 
afford all the aid in their power. 

At the Association held at Flat Swamp meet- 
ing house, in 1831, the committee appointed to 
collect information reported some progress, but 
that much more was necessary to be obtained, 
and that it was the wish of many that the old 
Jlistory and the new should be embodied in one 
volume. Whereupon the Association resolved 
that the committee with the compiler be request- 
ed to arrange the materials as they may think 
jproper, and that Mr. George Howard, of Tarbo- 
jough, be authorised to publish the same on his 
own responsibility; and the Editor of the Min- 
utes was requested 4o forward to the different 
churches subscription lists. 

At the Association held at Conoho Log Cha- 
nel, in 1832, the publication of the History was 
deferred another year; and it was resolved, that 
subscription lists be again sent to the churches. 

At the Association held at the Falls of Ta* 
River, in 1833, the publication of the History 
was taken into consideration; and finding upon 
examination of the subscription lists that a suffi- 
cient amount had not been subscribed to justify 
ilie undertaking, a collection was taken up m 



VUI INTRODUCTION. 

their body on the same terms as heretofore pro; 
posed; and the result being favorable, the Asso- 
ciation resolved, that the work be put to press a£ 
early as practicable. The Association then dis- 
charged the former committee, and appointed 
Elders Joshua Lawrence, William Hyman, and 
Luke Ward, and brethren Thomas Biggs, Joseph 
D. Biggs, and Cushion B. Hassell, a committee 
to examine the manuscript before going to press, 
which the undersigned was requested to prepare. 

Il might be thought by some sufficient in this 
Introduction to close, having informed :he read- 
er the course that had been pursued by the As- 
sociation to procure a continuation of its History 
to be published; but I consider it due to myself 
and to the Association in conclusion to state, that 
I am well aware many defects exist in the com- 
pilation, having to depend considerably on my 
own personal knowledge and observation of ma- 
ny facts, and deriving but little information from 
others; yet I feel assured that however defective 
it may be, it affords as correct a History as can 
now be obtained, 

Submitting, however, the History as it is now 
arranged to the members composing the churches 
of the Kehukee Association, and to all the well 
wishers of Zion, believing that by them it will 
not be received or perused with captious criti- 
cism, I pray the Almighty disposer of events so 
to dispose of it, that it may exert a salutary influ- 
ence on the present generation; and that posteri- 
ty, emerged from the thick cloud of contention 
and strife that has lowered over the Kehukee As- 
sociation at different times, may hail this record of 
past events as "a light to their path and a lamp to 
*heir feet." JOSEPH BIGGS, Bm% 



$ftuv&<rat< 



History is so genuine and familiar to men pT 
all estates, ages, qualities, sects and conditions, 
that amongst the many eulogies it hath receiv- 
ed from the learned pieces of ancient and mod- 
ern writers, it may be justly accounted rather 
the recreation, than the application of a studious, 
man. 

It is indeed that telescope by which we see in- 
to distant ages, and take up the actions of our 
forefathers, with as much evidence as the news 
of the latest Gazette; it is the mirror that repre- 
sents the various transactions of times past, and 
shews us the dress of antiquity, according to 
which we may rectify, or adjust our present 
fashions. In a word, it is the last will and test- 
ament of our deceased progenitors; which, 
th ugh it does not expressly leave every one of 
us a particular legacy, yet it shews us how we 
may be possessed of their inheritance; and ac- 
cordingly as we follow their example, live in re- 
putation or ignominy. 

Insomuch that the ruder ages of the world, 
svho were unacquainted with letters, and const- 
'2 



# PREFACE. 

quently ignorant of refined sciences, thought his** 
tory, next to their religion, the only useful and 
proper study of mankind,; and judging the form- 
ing of the manners, and regulating the actions of 
man, to be ihe duty and care of societies, they 
thought documents, precepts and laws, too weak 
a means to work so great effect, without they 
were confirmed and strengthened by the exam- 
ples of their predecessors; to which prone na- 
ture, even amongst the most barbarous, does 
willingly render an implicit veneration: And 
therefore seeing their libraries were their memo- 
ries, and words their characters, so songs and 
rude rhymes were their only books whereby 
their Bards and Druids instructed their children 
in the histories of former ages, making the fa- 
mous actions of their ancestors so much the 
more the pattern of their conduct and manners, 
as it was the subject of their innocent melody 
and mirth: And this custom is at this day in 
practice amongst the uncultivated heathens of 
Africa and America. 

But when the kind Heavens were pleased to 
gratify the industry of man with the invention of 
letters, no subject seemed to the ancients so 
worthy of the prerogative of being transmitted to 
posterity, as that of history; and indeed, the most 
ancient of their writings that can be found is of 
thiskind. Whether it was, that they knew no 
immortality but that of fame, or found no better 
way to provide with security for their offsprings 
in whom they were to live to posterity, than by 
handing down to them the methods and honest 
courses; by which some attained to honor, wealth 



PREFACE. xi 

and command, whilst others, by the contrary 
ways, lived and died in obscurity, poverty and 
contempt. 

But what satisfaction soever dying men may 
have in the prospect of a lasting name ? it is cer- 
tain the living reap great benefit from the regis* 
fer of their actions; for would a Prince have 
measures to govern, a Subject how to obey, a 
Statesman how to give counsel, a Judge and 
Magistrate how to execute justice, a Husband 
and Father m how to command and cherish, a 
Wife or Child how to love, honor and obey, all 
conditions of men how to perform mutual good 
offices in every kind of society, history, and es- 
pecially the truest and most ancient of all, the 
Holy Scriptures, is that repository from whence 
they may draw the truest maxims for all duties, 
exemplified with the good or bad successes of 
those who have followed or transgressed the 
same. And thus much, in short, of history in 
general. 

It has been, of late, the wish of some of the 
heading characters in the churches helorrging to 
the Kehukee Association, for a brief history of 
that Association to be published, from its origin 
to the present time, hoping it may prove a bless- 
ing to the churches in general, and ihe\Y posterity 
in particular; that they may be fully acquainted 
with the faith and practice of the churches to 
which their forefathers belonged. It was there- 
fore the request of some of the churches and min- 
isters, that we should engage in this work. 

It was a subject which had* not engaged our 
attention before; but upon a serious reflection* 



Vii PREFACE. 

that whereas we had been members of this As- 
sociation as long perhaps as any now living, and 
one of us had been Clerk of the Association for 
thirty .years, and acquired a considerable de- 
gree of information relative to the Association 
and churches in general; and being persuaded 
of the general utility of such an history, we were 
Encouraged to undertake the publication thereof. 
As to the history now about to be published, 
it is an history of a Baptist Association; it 
might therefore, be thought necessary by some, 
that something should be said respecting the ori- 
gin of that society. The name might probably 
have originated from the word Anabaptist, which 
was a stigma prefixed on us by the PedobaptistS, 
who suppose that because we baptize persons on 
the profession of their frith, who were sprinkled 
in infancy, that we re-baptise them. But it is 
the general opinion of the Baptists, that wher6 
any person has a valid baptism, agreeable to th6 
scriptures, that on such, baptism ought not to 
be repeated; and as infant sprinkling is not scrip- 
tural, and baptizing such persons on profession 
of their faith in Christ, who were sprinkled in in- 
fancy, cannot be re-baptism, therefore we dis- 
own the name of Anabaptists. The word Bap- 
tist may be considered as a society > or a baptiser* 
If by it we are to understand a particular society 
ofpeople,wemay claim the highest original, since 
we read in the very front of the New Testament, 
**In those days came John the Baptist, preaching 
in the wilderness, Sic." It does not say, in 
jthose days came John the Churchman, nor John 
the Presbyterian, nor John the Methodist, noi\ 



PREFACE. xiii 

John the Quaker: But John the Baptist. And 
we know that where a Baptist preacher comes 
into any place, and baptizes a number of believ- 
ers, they are immediately called Baptists. But 
it may be, that he was so called, because he was 
a Bapfizer; and we may be called Baptists, be- 
cause we hold with his baptism, in the manner it 
was by him and the Apostles administered: if so, 
we think it no disgrace, to be called by that 
name. It is most certain that the Baptists do 
administer the ordinance of Baptism agreeable 
to the word of God, in the practice of John and 
the Apostles. 

In the first place, we find from the Scriptures 
that Baptism is a duty. Mat. iii. 15. "Jesus 
answering, said, suffer it to be so now: for thus 
it becometh us to fulfil al! righteousness." Mat. 
xsviii. 19. "Go teach all nations, baptizing 
them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, 
and of the Holy Ghost." Acts, x. 47, 48. 
"Can any man forbid water, that these should 
not be baptized, which have received the Holy 
Ghost as well as we? and he commanded them to 
be baptized." 

Second. We have reason to believe that John 
the Baptist, and the Apostles, baptized none, only 
such as, within the judgment of charity, they 
believed to be possessed of Faith and Repent- 
ance. This appears from the following scrip- 
tures. Mat. iii. 5, 6. "Then went out unto 
hin\ Jerusalem, and all Judea, p4nd all the region 
round about Jordan, and were baptized of him 
in Jordan, confessing their sins." Verse 7. "But 
when he saw many of the Pharisees and Saddu- 
2* 



*tv PREFACE. 

cees come to his baptism, he said unto them, O 
generation of vipers! who hath warned you to flee 
-from the wrath to come. Bring forth, there- 
fore, fruits meet for repentance," he. Mark, 
xvi. 16. "He that betieveth and is baptized 
shall be saved." Acts, ii. 3. "Repent and be 
baptized every one of you in the name of the 
Lord Jesus." Verse, 41. "They that gladly 
received the word were baptized," &ic. Acts, 
viii. 36. "If thou believcst with all thy heart 
thou mayest." 

Third. We also have reason to believe, that 
in the primitive times, baptism was administered 
by dipping, or plunging the party baptized all 
under water. This seems to appear from the 
practice of John, and the Apostles — from the 
practice of John who baptized our Lord and 
many others in Jordan; and was baptizing in 
Enon near Salim, because there was much water 
there. John, iii. 23. *\lso from the practice 
of the Apostles. Acts, viii. 38, 39. "And they 
went down into the water, both Philip and the 
Eunuch; and he baptized him. And when they 
were come up out of the water, the spirit of the 
Lord caught away Philip, that the Eunuch saw 
him no more." But perhaps some may say, can 
we trace the practice of adult baptism, by im- 
mersion, from us to the Apostles' times? If this 
was required of the Pedobaptists to trace the 
practice of baptizing infants, from the present 
time to the days of the Apostles, we should find 
the Episcopalians, Presbyterians and Method- 
ists, at a very great loss. For after they had 
dragged it through Rome, and bad the sane- 



■ PREFACE. xv 

tion of Popes, Councils, Churches, and some of 
the ancient Fathers, so far from tracing it to the 
Apostles da} s, it cannot be carried farther back, 
by positive proof, than the third century, in 
which mention is made of it by Tertullian, Ori- 
gen and Cyprian. And the first of these dis- 
suades from it, and advises to defer baptism to 
riper years. Origen, with all his corruptions, 
mentions it, but his translations are so imperfect, 
that it h observed by some, that, "Origen is not 
to be found in Origen." And although it is al- 
lowed that infant baptism began to be practised 
in Cyprian's day, yet it was esteemed an upstart 
notion, since it was not till then determined at 
what time it should be administered. But it is 
evident that believers' baptism by immersion, was 
the primitive practice, and that there have been 
some, no doubt, ever since the Apostles, in some 
part of the world, who practised it; as is evident 
there were in Bohemia, Germany, Piedmont 
and other places, notwithstanding the general 
apostacy which took place since the Apostles 
times throughout the whole world. And as we 
think we are sufficiently authorized to baptize be- 
lievers by immersion, so we think that gathering, 
and organizing particular churches, and their 
union in an Association way, is agreeable to the 
standard of truth, the unerring word of God. 
And for the satisfaction of the reader, we will 
give a proper definition of the church, and the 
utility of an Association of churches, which we 
think is agreeable to the Holy Scriptures. On 
the Church. — The word church y 'm the New Test- 
ament, must necessarily mean an assembly, and 



itf PREFACE. 

not the house in which they assemble. Mat. xviii. 
15, 16, 17. ''Moreover, if thy brother shall 
trespass against thee, go and tell him his fault 
between thee and him alone: if he shall hear 
thee, thou hast gained thy brother. But if he 
will not hear thee, then take with thee one or two 
more, that in the mouth of two or three witness- 
es every word may be established. And if he 
shall neglect to hear them, tell it to the church. ,y 
It cannot be supposed our Lord meant that we 
should tell it to the house. Again. Acts, ii. 47. 
"The Lord added to the church daily such as 
should be saved." 1 Cor. xiv. 23. "If there- 
fore the church be come together in one place." 
These places in the sacred writings must un- 
doubtedly allude to the people, and not to the 
building. The New Testament writers always 
apply the word church to a religious assembly* 
selected and called out of the world by the doc- 
trine of the gospel, to worship the true God ac- 
cording to his word. And is emphatically rep- 
resented in the nineteenth article of the Episco- 
pal church, which saith, "The visible church of 
"Christ is a congregation of faithful men, in the 
"which the pure word of God is preached, and 
"the sacraments be duly administered, accord- 
ing to Christ's ordinance, in all those things 
"that of necessity are requisite to the same." 

When we consult the sacred writings, we have 
sufficient reason to believe that the word churchy 
is intended to signify the church catholic, trium- 
phant, invisible and particular. 

The church catholic, means all that have beeiv 
or ever will be saved. Eph. L 22, 23. "And 



PREFACE. xvli 

gave liim to be head over all things to the church 
which is his body, the fullness of him that filleth 
all in all " Collos. i. 18, 24. The church 
triumphant, means all the saints, who are now 
already in Heaven. Heb. xii. 23. "The gen- 
eral assembly and church of the first born, which 
are written in Heaven — and to the spirits of just 
men made perfect." The church militant, means 
all the saints on earth. There are about nine 
passages in scripture which refer to this church. 
Acts, viii. 3. 1 Cor. x. 32.— xii. 28— xv. 9, 
Gal. i 13 Phil. ill. 16. i Tim. iii. 15, 
The invisible church, means all the elect not yet 
called. "Other sheep I have, which are not of 
this fold: them also must I bring, and they shall 
hear my voice; and there shall be one fold and 
one shepherd." John x. 16. 

A particular church, is a little distinct and 
separate society, called out of the world, and 
professing faith iri Christ Jesus, have given 
themselves up to the Lord, and to one another, to 
be governed and guided by a proper discipline 
agreeable to the word of God. Of this sort of 
church frequent mention is made in the word of 
the Lord. Some of the passages relative there- 
to, are, "The church in their house." Rom. 
xvii 5. — 1 Col. xvi. 9. "The church in thine 
house." Phil. 2. "The church in Jerusalem." 
Acts, viii. 1. — At Antioch, at Rome, Corinth, 
Philadelphia, Ephesus, Smyrna, &x. &c. 

The churches which compose the Kehukee 
Baptist Association, profess to be of this des- 
cription; and churches baptized vpon profession 
ijof their faith in Christ Jesus,' and well organic- 



xviii PREFACE, 

ed, we think it is agreeable to those particular- 
Congregational churches mentioned in the Holy 
Scriptures 

An Association, is a combination of churches 
uniting together in one boay 3 governed by cer- 
tain rules when met together, and whose business 
it is to hear from, and enquire into the state of 
the churches in the union, and give advice, in 
order to reconcile differences, detect errors and 
remove difficulties; so as not to lord it over 
God's heritage, but sit and act only as an advi- 
sary council. 

The divine authority of this ancient distort 
seems manifest in the example of our Lord, and 
his holy Apostles. Our blessed Lord when en- 
tering on his divine mission, and laying a plan 
for the establishment of his kingdom, as soon as 
he entered on his public ministry, made choice 
of twelve, with whom he associated, not indeed to 
assist him by their counsel, but to train them up 
to assist one another. And we find the Apostles 
themselves assembled on certain occasions to 
confer about the affairs of the churches. See 
Acts, xv. If Paul, Barnabas and others, there- 
fore were delegated by their brethren of the 
churches at Antioch, to assemble, or associate 
with the Apostles and Elders at Jerusalem, how 
fnuch more will the propriety and necessity of 
such meetings or assemblies, appear to us who 
do not enjoy their ohUities, nor possess their pow- 
ers. And as the scriptures support its divine 
authority and expediency, so from the experience 
we have had of its well known benefits, w T e are 
the more easily persuaded that the churches will 



PREFACE. &i* 

-always find it of general utility, in maintaining 
and supporting — 1. A general union, 2 r i he 
communion of the churches. 3. The increase of 
brotherly lave. 4, To gain information of the 
state of the churches. 5. Remove difficulties. 
6. Grant supplies to destitute churches. 7. The 
extirpation of false doctrines; and 8. The bene- 
fit arising to the church and neighborhood where 
*the Association is bolden. 

1st. The Association is of general utility iij 
supporting and maintaining a general union, 
Now, the more firmly any civil or religious soci- 
ety is knit together by love, and coalesce in uni~ 
fyi by so much the better they are secured 
against their common enemies and dangers, and 
become still the more prosperous and flourishing, 
United force, we all know, is more than single; 
and hence it is, we are so frequently in the sa- 
cred scriptures exhorted to a general unanimity, 
Rom. xii. 16.— 1 Cor. i. 10.— Phil. ii. 2« — 
Psal. cxxxiii. 1. 

2d. The general utility of an Association al- 
so consists in the communion of the churches. It 
is through this sameness of love, mind and rule, 
that a chain of communion is, or can be kept up 
with the churches. Christ's church is a family. 
Any thing that is lawful and right, that will 
maintain an union among the children, so they 
with love and fellowship, can from time to time 
eat bread together in the spirit of meekness, must 
be of use. Christ's church is a body. All pro- 
per means that have a tendency to keep the 
members in place, should be used for that pur- 
pose; For the beauty and strength of a bvd/y» 



x# PREFACE. 

depend on its not being maimed, or disordered, 
We therefore think that it is impossible that so 
endearing a privilege, and particular duty, as 
the communion of the churches, can be preserved 
sacred, and inviolable without some such mode 
of associating together; where we can hear from 
the different churches, know each others princi- 
ples, and be acquainted with the proper disci* 
pline of each church; we therefore think that 
an Association is useful. 

3d VVb not only think that it tends to pre- 
serve a communion of churehes, but we also be* 
lieve it has a tendency to increase brotherly love. 
It is through this medium that an acquaintance 
is cultivated amongst the brethren, and brotherly 
love increased and continued. Heb. xiii. 1. 

4th. To gain proper information of the state of 
the churches. It is by the means of an Associa- 
tion that we obtain this information, and from 
the accounts given^ be able to ascertain whether 
they be in prosperous or declining circumstan- 
ces; and so can propose measures accordingly s 
so as to mourn with them that mourn, and re- 
joice with them that do rejoice. 

5 th. By means of an Association, brethren un* 
der difficulties of mind may be relieved, by pre- 
senting their queries to the Association, and hav- 
ing them properly discussed; which often tends 
to the satisfaction of the aggrieved party; and as, 
in the multitude of counsellors there is safety^ 
we believe an Association is useful. 

6th It is through this mode of assembling 
together, that information is communicated to 
ibe r Association of the state of destitute churchei. 



PREFACE, xxi 

and on their request, and by the consent of the 
brethren in the ministry, supplies can be granted. 
Ministers receive the intelligence, make their ap- 
pointments, and the destitute churches get fur- 
nished at proper seasons, and the ordinances ad- 
ministered to them. 

7th. It is useful for the extirpation of hetero- 
doxy* "Do not err my beloved brethren," was 
the exhortation of the Apostle to primitive 
christians; and another Apostle warrantably in- 
forms us that some should bring in damnable 
heresies. Now, if this was the case in ancient 
times, we may reasonably expect it in this cor- 
rupt age of the world. And where are we so 
likely to gain the information of these heretical 
principles amongst the church, if there be any, 
as at the Association; and where so proper a 
place to nip them in the bud as at this timef 
Thus we see the primitive churches, and thai un- 
der the immediate inspection of the Apostles 
themselves, were likely to err in this point, had 
they not had recourse to the assembly of the 
Apostles and others met at Jerusalem. Witness 
the great disputation of Paul, with all his expe- 
rience, his learning, his oratory, and his inspi- 
ration (for we may suppose he used all his ef- 
forts) to refute an error then getting birth in 
the church, and all would not do> it must be 
carried up to the Association of the Apostles 
and Elders delegated at Jerusalem* 

8th. The good effects which have attended 
the chuvch and neighborhood where these nume- 
rous assemblies have attended, bespeak the util- 
ity of the Association of churches. 



xxii PREFACE, 

Thus, dear Reader, we have given sufficient 
reasons to believe that the mode of gathering 
churches, by baptizing believers, and their un- 
ion in an Association way, is purely scriptural 
and apostolical. 

v Before we entirely close the subject of gather- 
ing churches after this mode, it might not be 
amiss to say something with respect to the par- 
ticular communion of the Baptist churches. We 
have been, by some, judged as a singular nar- 
row hearted set of christians, because we would 
not commune with other societies. But we ap- 
prehend ourselves justifiable in so doing, and 
without this we could not be consistent with our 
own principles. For we believe that christian 
Baptism is the first ordinance a believer ought to 
comply with; and persons cannot become regu- 
lar church members without first being baptized 
according to the word of God. This appears 
from the conduct of the Apostles in the first ga- 
thering of the churches of Jesus Christ. Acts, ii. 
41, 42. "They that gladly received the word 
were baptized; and the same day there were add- 
ed unto them about 3000 souls." And they, i. e. 
those baptized, continued steadfastly in the 
Apostle's doctrine and fellowship, and in break- 
ing of bread and in prayers. Also it is said, 
"By one spirit we are all baptized into one body." 
1 Cor. xii. 13. That is, by the leading and 
teaching of the Holy Spirit we are all baptized 
into one body, i. e. the church. And we can- 
not find from the holy scriptures, and we think 
no man can, that since the ascension of our 
Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, that any were 



PREFACE. xxiii 

received members of the visible church before 
they submitted to the ordinance of baptism. And 
we also believe, that it is out of the power of any 
person to prove, that any one was ever admitted 
to the ordinance of the Lord's supper before he 
was first baptized. Were any of John's pros- 
elytes? No. The ordinance of the supper had 
never then been administered. Were any of the 
members at the church at Rome, Corinth, Ga- 
latia, Philippi, Ephesus, &c? We have no 
reason to believe they were. The Apostle's ex- 
hortation to the people was, "Repent and be 
baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus 
Christ, for the remission of your sins." Acts, 
li. 38. And it is evident from sundry exam- 
ples, that haptkm was the first ordinance to be 
complied with, before they were admitted to 

cih^r crd';r.«;;c^, or tGc!,urcn privileges. What 

was the first ordinance the 3000 who gladly re- 
ceived the word were admitted to? It was bap- 
tism,) the same day. What was the first the 
Eunuch complied with, after he believed with all 
his heart? It was baptism. What was the first 
the Jailor and his house were admitted to, after 
he believed in God with all his house? Jt was 
baptism, the same hour of the night. Acts. xvi. 
33. What was the first Lydia complied with, after 
the Lord opened her heart? It was baptism. Acts, 
xvi. 15. What was the first the Apostle Paul sub- 
mitted to after Annaniaslaid his hands on him, 
and said, "Brother Saul receive thy sight?" It 
was baptism. He does not say, and now why 
tarriest thou? arise and go preach the gospel; 
nor does he say, now, why tarriest thou, arise 



&3uv PREFACE. 

and come to the Lord's tabled but arise and be 
baptized. Acts, ix. 18. xxii. 16. 

We therefore do believe that it is a duty fop 
every real christian to comply with baptism in 
the first place, agreeable to the word of God, and 
then be entitled to the privileges of the church 
and to the ordinances in general. And except 
they do comply with their duty in this respect, 
they are disorderly; and we are commanded to 
withdraw from every brother that walks disor- 
derly. 2 Thess. iii. 6. We therefore thinfe 
we are justifiable, from God's word, to raise a 
bar of communion against all churches and pet- 
sons who have not a baptism that is valid, agree* 
able to the word of the Lord. 

These are a few of our reasons for particular 
communion^ which we hope may be duly consid- 
ered, and weighed in the balance of the sanctua- 
ry with an even hand. 

As to the ensuing history we are about to pub- 
lish, we can assure thee, Reader, that we have 
endeavored to collect all the materials we could 
come at; and obtain all the information we could, 
in order to render the work complete: Not- 
withstanding all, it may be imperfect in many 
things, as it is well known that writings of this 
kind are subject to errors. But we hope to 
obtain a pardon from the public, when we as- 
sure them that we have done the best we could. 

The greatest part of the History, our readers 
may depend on the reality of those facts recorded, 
as we were both eye and ear witnesses to them. 

To conclude, we may add, that this little 
compendium will present you with the glorioas 



PREFACE. xx* 

increase of Christ's kingdom, in callingpoor sin- 
ners to the happy privileges of the gospel, and 
the increase of his churches. When our Asso- 
ciation was first established, there were only ten 
churches, and now near about ninety, which 
have become three Associations in thirty years. 
Blessed be God, we hope the happy day is fast 
approaching, when the kingdoms of this world 
shall become the kingdoms of our Lord and 
his Christ. May we all pray, "thy kingdom 
come." 

We are, dear reader, your soul's well wishers, 
and affectionate servants in the gospel of our 
dear Lord Jesus. 

LEMUEL BURKITTY 
JESSE READ. 
Northampton County , Xorth- ) 
Carolina, October, 1803. > 



#*- 



A CONCISE HISTORY 

OF THE 

Kehukee Baptist dissociation. 



CHAP. I. 

1. The State of the Churches at first 9 before they 
were united in an Association at all* 2. The 
Revolution those Churches passed through be- 
fore they became an established Association. 3, 
The Form of a Church Covenant, and the 
Plan on which they were established. 4, 
Biographical Sketches of some of those Minis:? 
ters, who died before the Establishment of the 
Association on its present Order. 

Some of the churches which at first composed 
the Kehukee Association, were, the church at 
Tosniot, in Edgecombe county; the church at 
Kehukee, in Halifax county; the church at the 
Falls of Tar river, in Edgecombe county; the 
church on Fishing creek, in Halifax county; the 
church on Reedy creek, in Warren county; the 
church at Sandy Run, in Bertie county; and the 
church in Camden county, North Carolina. The 
most of these churches, before they were ever 
united in an Association, were General Baptists, 
and held with the Armipian tenets. We believe 



*8 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

they were the descendants of the English General 
Baptists, because we find from some original pa- 
pers, that their confession of Faith was subscribed 
by certain Elders, and Deacons, and Brethren, 
in behalf of themselves and others, to whom they 
belonged, both in London, and several counties 
in England, and was presented to King Charles 
the second* 

They preached, and adhered to the Arminian, 
or Free-will doctrines, and their churches were 
first established upon this system. They gather- 
ed churches without requiring an experience of 
grace previous ,te their baptism: But baptized 
all who believed in the doctrine of baptism by 
immersion, and requested baptism of them. The 
churches of this order were first gathered here by 
Elders Paul Palmer and Joseph Parker, and 
were succeeded by a number of ministers whom 
they had baptized; and some of whom we have 
no reason to believe were converted when they 
were baptized, or first began to preach We 
cannot learn that it was customary with them to 
hold an Association at all; but met at yearly 
meetings, where matters of consequence were de- 
termined. 

This was the state of these churches until di- 
vine providence disposed the Philadelphia Bap* 
tist Association to send Messrs. Vanhokn and 
Miller, two of the ministers belonging to that 
Association, who lived in New Jersey, to travel 
into the southern Colonies, and visit the church- 
es and preach the gospel. And it appears that 
it was attended with an happy eflv-ct. When 
they came into North Carolina, some of the 
members belonging to these churches seemed to 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 29 

be afraid of them, as they were styled by th6 
most of people New Lights; but by the greatest 
part of the churches they were cordially received* 

Their preaching and conversation seemed to 
be with power, the hearts of the people seemed to 
be open, and a very great blessing seemed to at- 
tend their labors, 

Through their instrumentality many people 
were awakened, many of the members of these 
churches were convinced of their error, and were 
instructed in the doctrines of the gospel; and 
some churches were organized anew, and estab* 
lished upon the principles of the doctrine of grace. 
These churches thus newly constituted, adopted 
the Baptist confession of faith published in Lon- 
don in 1689, containing 32 articles, and upon 
which the Philadelphia and Charleston associa- 
tions are founded. And as it is customary for 
churches thus formed, at their first constitution, 
to have a church covenant, in which they so- 
lemnly agree to endeavor to keep up the disci- 
pline of the church, the following specimen will 
shew the reader something of the nature of that 
covenant compact, It is to this effect: 

FORASMUCH as Almighty God, by his grace, 
has been pleased to call us (whosejnames are under- 
neath subscribed) out of darkness into his marvellous 
light, and all of us have been regularly baptized up- 
on a profession of our Faith in Christ Jesus, and have 
given up ourselves to the Lord, and to one another, 
in a gospel church way, to be governed and guided 
by a proper discipline agreeable to the word of God:- 
We do therefore, in the name of our Lord Jesus, and 
by his assistance, covenant and agree to keep up the 
discipline of the church we are members of, in the 
most brotherly affection towards each other, white 



30 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

we endeavor punctually to observe the following 
rules, viz: 

1st. In brotherly love to pray for each other, to 
watch over one another, and if need be, in the most 
terrier and affectionate manner to reprove one an- 
other. That is, if we discover any thing amiss in a 
brother, to go and tell him his fault according to the 
direction given by our Lord in the 18th of Saint Mat- 
thew's gospel; and not to be whispering and back- 
biting. We akso agree, with God's assistance, to pray 
in our families, attend our church meetings, observe 
the Lord's day and keep it holy, and not absent our- 
selves from the communion of the Lord's supper 
witliout a lawful excuse; to be ready to communicate 
to the defraying of the church's expences, and for 
the support of the ministry; not irregularly to depart 
from the fellowship of the church, nor remove to dis- 
tant churches without a regular dismission. 

These things we do covenant and agree to observe 
and keep sacred, in the name of, and by the assist- 
ance of, the Holy Trinity. Amen. Signed by the 
mutual consent of the members whose names are un- 
derneath subscribed. 

Thus, by means of those ministers who vi- 
sited the churches, several were reformed, and 
the work of reformation progressed, until the 
gjeater part of what few churches were gathered 
in North Carolina, both ministers and members, 
came into the Regular Baptist order. Elder 
Palmer, we believe, died before the Reforma- 
tion took place; and Elder Joseph Parker, we 
cannot learn, was ever convinced of his errors, 
or receded from them; but continued in his way 
as before. And we cannot understand he was 
very successful, because all the ministers of that 
party" were brought over to embrace the Calvi- 
nistic scheme, except himself, Elder Winjield and 
Elder William Parker; and we presume, but a 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. Si 

lew others, either ministers or members, except 
the members of their churches. 

The churches thus reformed, although but few 
in number, entered into an Association compact 
about the year 1765, and first convened at Ke- 
hukee, from whence the Association took the 
name of the "Kehukee Association." Tims 
being formed in a body, they corresponded with 
the Charleston Association; and in this situation 
they continued some years, until the year 1774, 
when an alteration took place, which our read- 
ers will be favored with in the next chapter. 

The principal ministers which belonged to the 
Association on its first establishment, were, El- 
ders Jonathan Thomas, John Thomas, John 
Moore, John Burges, William Burges, Charles 
Daniel, William W r alker, John Meglamre, James 
Abington, Thomas Pope, and Henry Abbott. 
All of whom, except Elders John Meglamre and 
James Abington, we believe, were baptized by 
ministers of the Free-will order. 
|. As some of these ministers died before those 
remarkable events took place, mentioned In the 
succeeding chapter, it would be necessary to 
give a few sketches of their biography in the 
close of this. 

Elder JAMES JIBING TOM. 

Elder James Abington was a resident of Ber- 
tie county, North Carolina. Before he became 
religious, he was a man much addicted to sport- 
ing and gaming, and very vicious in his life 
and conversation* But it pleased God by his 
great goodness to convince him of his dreadful 



§2 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

State by nature, and to reveal his dear Son Je- 
sus Christ to his soul; and after he was convert- 
ed, he was baptized, and began to preach ths 
gospel. He became a member of the church at 
Sandy Run, and after preaching some time he 
was ordained pastor of that church, and was in- 
^rumental in gathering a considerable number 
of members. He was a man of a bright genius, 
a ready mind, a good voice; and was a Boaner- 
ges in preaching the word. He was remarkably 
gifted in distinguishing between the Law and the 
Gospel. The insufficiency of the one to justify 
a sinner in the sight of God, and the suitableness 
of the other to recommend us into the favor of 
God. Be continued but a {ew years in the work 
of the ministry, how long we are not able to say, 
but at last being taken very ill, he was taken 
away from the evil to come. He departed this 
life February, 1772. His funeral sermon was 
preached by Elder Jonathan Thomas, from ii. 
Tim. iv. 7, 8. "I have fought a good fight, I 
"have finished my course, 1 have kept the faith: 
"Henceforth there is laid up for me a crown of 
"righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous 
"'judge, shall give me at that day." 

Elder JONATHAN THOMAS. 

Jonathan Thomas was the son of John Tho^ 
mas, of Edgecombe county, North Carolina. 
He had a brother by the name of John. Both 
his father and brother were preachers of the 
Baptist denomination. Jonathan, at first, was 
received into a church and baptized by a minis* 
\er of the Fret-will order. But in process 0f 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 33 

time embraced the Calvinian plan, and became 
an eminent preacher of the regular Baptist So- 
ciety. He was ordained December, 1758. He 
was a man of talents, very affable in his address, 
and a great orator. He had the general esteem 
of the churches, and was revered by all men of 
character with whom he was acquainted, He 
was exceeding orthodox in his principles, and 
had a peculiar faculty in reconciling seeming 
contradictions in the scriptures; and on intricate 
passages of scripture, hisjudgment was thought 
exceeding good. In a word, he appeared as a 
pious g©od christian, a sensible zealous minister 
of the gospel, and one who aimed at the peace 
and harmony of the churches in general: Inso- 
much, that where discord or division were likely 
to take place in a church, he was very careful to 
endeavor to reconcile them again; and he very 
often proved successful in his attempts. To- 
wards the latter end of his life, he appeared to 
be more zealous, and more constantly emploj^ed 
in travelling and preaching. His last sermon 
was preached at Sandy Run meeting-house, in 
Bertie county, from Luke xiv. 23. "Compel 
"them to come in, that my house may be filled." 
He said, "his master had sent him to compel 
"them to come in, and they need not begin to 
"make excuse, for no excuse could be received, 
"nor denial taken. 5 ' There was a large assem- 
bly, and but few in the congregation but what 
were in floods of tears; and many cried out loud- 
ly. This was in December, 1774; and from 
Sandy Run he went home, being under com- 
plaint of a bad cold, and the last of January or 
iirst of February following, he died. 
4 



m HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 



CHAP. If. 

S . The Revolution (he Association passed through 
before established on the present plan. 2. Her 
Organization at the Falls of Tar River, and 
the Principles on which she is founded, adopt- 
ed at Sappony, in Sussex county, Virginia; 
and afterwards published by order of the Asso- 
ciation held at WhitfieWs meeting-house, Pitt 
county, North Carolina, October 1789. 3. 
Biographical Sketches of Elder James BelL 
4. Persecution of Elder John Turner. 

Some years after the Association was estab- 
lished on its original plan, in Virginia, and some 
parts of North Carolina, the Separate Baptists 
(as they were then called) increased very fast. 
The Separates first arose in New England, 
where some pious ministers and members left the 
Presbyterian, or the Standing Order, on the ac- 
count of their formality and superfluity, viz. 1. 
Because they were too extravagant in their ap- 
parel. 2. Because they did not believe their 
form of church government to be right. But 
chiefly because they would admit none to the 
ministry only men of classical education, and 
many of their ministers apparently seemed to be 
unconverted. They were then called Separate 
JS*ewlight$* Some of these were baptised and 
moved into the southern provinces, particularly 
Elders Shubal Sterns and Daniel .Marshall, 
whose labors were wonderfully blessed in Virgi- 
nia, North and South Carolina, and Georgia. 
Many souls were converted 3 and as the work of 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 35 

the Lord progressed, many churches were estab- 
ed in Virginia and some in North Carolina. 
Their preachers were exceeding pious and zeal- 
ous men, and their labors wonderfully blessed: 
And such a work appeared to be amongst the peo- 
ple, that "some were amazed and stood in doubt, 
saj'ing what means this." The distinction be- 
tween us and them was, that they were called 
Separates, and the Philadelphia, the Charleston, 
and the Kehukee Association, were called Regu- 
lar Baptists. 

The Kehukee Association desirous of fellow- 
ship, and a general communion between these 
two parties, sent Elders Jonathan Thomas and 
John Meglamre to the Separate Baptist Associa- 
tion, which was holden in one of the northern 
counties in Virginia, to endeavor to effect an uni- 
on. Accordingly their Association delegated 
Elders Elijah Craig and David Thompson to the 
Kehukee Association, which was holden at Ke- 
hukee meeting house, in Halifax county, North 
Carolina, August, 1772, and rendered their rea- 
sons why they could not commune with the Reg- 
ulars. Their reasons were as follows, viz: 1. 
They complained of the Regulars not being 
strict enough in receiving experiences, when per- 
sons made application to their churches for bap- 
tism, in order to become church members. 2. 
They refused communion with Regular Baptist 
churches, be( a»ise they believed that faith in 
Christ Jesus was essential to qualify a person for 
baptism, yet many of the Regular churches had 
members in them who acknowledged they were 
baptized before they believed, o The Separates 
found fault with the Regulars for their manner 



36 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

of dress, supposing they indulged their members 
in superfluity of apparel. These, with a few oth- 
er non-essentials, were the reasons they refused 
communion with us: But the most weighty rea- 
son was, "the Regulars holding persons in fel- 
lowship in their churches, who were baptized hi 
unbelief;" which was a matter of some conse- 
quence, and operated strongly on the minds of 
many belonging to the Kehukee Association. 
Accordingly in 1774, the church in Bertie, un- 
der the care of Elder Lemuel BurJcitt, held a con- 
ference, and declared they would commune with 
none who confessed they were baptized before 
they believed in Christ. And the reasons why 
they did so were, because they believed that from 
the practice of John the Baptist, from the com- 
mission given by our Lord to his Apostles, and 
the conduct of the Apostles in executing that 
commission, that repentance towards God and 
faith in our Lord Jesus Christ, were required as 
a pre-requisite to baptism of all they baptized* 
Jf so, it appears reasonable that even adult per- 
sons themselves, if baptized in a state of imperii- 
tency and unbelief are no more the proper sub- 
jects of the ordinance than infants, as the age of 
the person does not qualify him for baptism, but 
his faith in Christ. These things had such 
weight on the minds ef the members of that 
church, that they declared in open conference 
non-fellowship with all churches m& persons who 
held and maintained the contrary doctrine. And 
some of the members of that church, who we 
baptized in unbelief, came forward and petition- 
ed for baptism, and were baptized upon confes- 
sion of their faith in Christ. 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 37 

The church at Sandy Run had no sooner set 
up a bar of communion against such churches 
and members, than they received information 
that the church in Sussex, in Virginia, under the 
pastoral care of Elder John Meglamre; the church 
in Brunswick, under the care ofZachary Thomp- 
son; the church in the Isle of Wight, under the 
care of David Barrow, had done the same. AU 
these churches belonged to the Kehukee Associ- 
ation. 

In October, 1775, the Kehukee Regular Bap- 
tist Association, according to their annual ap- 
pointment, by their delegates, met at the Falls of 
Tar River, John Moore's meeting house, and oa 
Saturday, being assembled in the meeting house, 
information was received by the other churches 
belonging to the Association, what the churches 
in Bertie, Sussex, Brunswick, and the Isle of 
Wight had done. And a great dissension arose 
amongst the churches respecting the propriety of 
their proceedings; and the other party claimed 
the prerogative of being the Kehukee Associa- 
tion, and we who had engaged in the reforma- 
tion, insisted on being ike true genuine Associa- 
tion, as we believed we had never departed from 
the original plan on which that Association was 
first founded. We argued, that it was well 
known, that we all held faith in Christ essential 
to qualify a person for baptism, and if so, they 
who were baptized before they believed, were 
not baptized agreeable to God's word; and as 
their baptism is not valid they remain unbaptized 
members; and not to commune with unbaptized 
persons was a principle of the Association on 
which we were at first established. We therefore 
4* 



38 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

argued that we were the true Association whg 
had not departed from their original principles. 
After some desultory conversation, the Associa- 
tion divided, and those churches which had be- 
gun the reformation sat and held an Association 
in the meeting house; and the other party went 
into the woods, the first day, and held an Associ- 
ation, and the second day removed to a private 
house in the neighborhood. 

This division, our readers may be well assu- 
red, afforded great grief to many truly pious and 
godly souls; but that God who works all things 
by his divine providence, according to the coun- 
sel of his own will> was pleased to bring order oujt 
of confusion, and good out of evil, for by these 
means he was pleased to effect a reformation in 
the churches, and bring about a glorious revival 
of religion throughout the churches in general. 
It was not many years before all the churches 
were united again, and the names Regular and: 
Separate buried in oblivion, and we were known 
to the world by the name of the "United Bap- 
tists." And blessed be God/the distinction at 
this time has become obsolete, and the different 
qames lost throughout the United States,* and 
we hope throughout the world. 

*Until about twelve months before the writing of 
this History, the distinction was kept up in the State 
of Kentucky. There were a few churches in that 
State which still retained the name of Separates, and 
the ministers and members seemed rather inclined 
to believe in general redemption. These churches 
chiefly lay in the counties of that State, south of the 
yiver Kentucky, and were formed into an Association 
called the Separate Association, and they did not 
(fdmmune with the other Associations* But by a \s£\ 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 39 

One particular reason why those churches were 
at first dissatisfied with others, and were so for- 
ward in sitting up a bar of communion against 
churches and individuals, who held members in 
fellowship who were baptized in unbelief, was, 
because several of those churches, that at first be- 
longed to the Kehukee Association, were gather- 
ed by the Free will Baptists, and as their custom 
was to baptize any persons who were willing, 
whether they had an experience of grace or not, 
so in consequence of this practice, they had ma* 
ny members and several ministers in those chur- 
ches, who were baptized before they were con- 
verted; and after they were brought to the know- 
ledge of the truth, and joined the Regulars, open- 
ly confessed they were baptized before they be- 
lieved: And some of them said they did it in 
hope of getting to heaven by it. Some of their 
ministers confessed they had endeavored to preach, 
and administer the ordinance of baptism to oth- 
ers, after they were baptized, before they were 
converted themselves; and so zealous were they 
for baptism, (as some of them expected salvation 
by it) that one of their preachers confessed, if he 
could get any willing to be baptized, and it was 
in the night, that he would baptize them by fire 
light, for fear they should get out of the notion 
of it before the next morning. 

We therefore in conscience thought, and that 
from God's word, that we ought to withdraw 
from every brother that walked disorderly, and 



ter from Elder David Barrow to Elder Burkitt, we 
learn that there is a happy union taken place amongst 
111! the Associations, and these names lost. 



40 HISTORY of the KEH UKJ E 

we were under very great impressions to begin a 
reformation in the churches. 

The principal churches which stood in opposi- 
tion to our measures, at the time when the divi- 
sion took place at the Falls of Tar River, were 
the church at Tosniot, the church on Fishing 
creek, formerly under the care of Charles Dan- 
iel; the church at Kehukee, under the care of 
William Burges; the church in Warren county, 
on Reedy creek, formerly under the care o( Wil- 
liam Walker; and part of the church at the Falls 
of Tar River — for it appears that church was di- 
vided — Col. Horn, who was a member of that 
church, was a chief speaker in the time of the 
contention, and had a very warm debate with 
Thomas Daniel, a minister of the other party; 
and Col. Horn insisted on the propriety of our 
procedure, and justified our raising a bar of com- 
munion against them. The chief ministers be- 
longing to those churches who opposed the refor- 
mation, were, Elders John Moore, William Sur- 
ges, John Thomas and Thomas Daniel. The 
churches on the other side of the question, were, 
the church at Sandy Run, the church in Sussex, 
the church in Brunswick, and the church in Isle 
of Wight,Virginia. Their chief ministers present, 
were, Elders John Meglamre, David Barrow and 
Lemuel Burkitt. 

Very little business of consequence was done 
at this Association, except their engagements to 
keep up the order and rules of an Association; 
and accordingly agreed to meet the next time at 
Elder James Bell's meeting house, on Sappony 
creek, in Sussex county, Virginia. 

On the Saturday before the 2d Sunday in Au* 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 41 

gust, 1777, delegates from ten churches (some of 
which were, what was then called Separates, and 
others which formerly belonged to the Kehukee 
Association, and had raised a bar against unbap- 
lized members, of which mention was made be- 
fore) met in an annual Association at Elder 
James Bell's meeting house, on Sappony, in Sus- 
sex county, Virginia, and by their delegates pre- 
sented a confession of their faith to the Associa- 
tion; which was unanimously acceded to. At 
which time and place the Association to which 
we now belong, was settled and established on its 
present order. 

It was necessary at this time, for the churches 
to present in their letters to the Association, a 
confession of their faith; because, 1st. Some of 
them were churches that claimed the prerogative 
of being the Kehukee Association, that never had 
departed from their original principles, therefore 
in order to convince the other churches, and the 
world at large, that they still held the same faith 
and order they were at first established on, it was 
necessary to present to this Association, and 
make public, their confession of faith. 

2d» As some of those churches which at this 
time were about to unite in the Association with 
us, had never before been members, and were 
what was then called Separates, it was necessary 
they should present a confession of their faith, 
that it might be known whether we all agreed in 
principles or not. 

The churches, by their delegates, then conve- 
ned, and the number of members they contained, 
and their present order, whether Regulars or Se- 
parates, are as follow, viz: 



42 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

JVb. 
2. The church in Bertie county, N. Carolina, 
under the care of Elder Lemuel Burkitt, 21? 

2. The church in Sussex, Virginia, under the 

care of Elder John Meglamre, - 209 

3. The church in Brunswick, Virginia, under 

the care of Elder Zachary Thompson, 3:20 

4. The church in the Isle of Wight, under the 

care of Elder David Barrow, - 142 

5. A newly constituted church in Chowan 
county, North Carolina, 84 

6. The church in Granville county, N.Carolina, 
under the care of Elder Henry Ledbetter, 70 

7. The church in Bute, North Carolina, under 

the care of Elder Joshua Kelly, - 109 

8. The church in Sussex, Virginia, under the 

care of Eider James Bell, - 200 

9. The church at Rocky Swamp, North Caro- 
lina, under the care of Elder Jesse Read, 139 

10. The church in Edgecombe county, under 

the care of Elder John Tanner, - 100 

1590 
Of which churches, the first six were Regulars, 
*md the last mentioned four were Separates. 

An abstract of the principles then agreed to, and 
the substance of which afterwards was publish- 
ed in print, by order of the Association at 
Whitfield's meeting house, Pitt county, North 
Carolina, 1799, is as follows, viz: 

1. We believe in the being of God, as almigh- 
ty, eternal, unchangeable, of infinite wisdom, 
power, justice, holiness, goodness, mercy and 
truth: And that this God has revealed himself in 
his word, under the characters of Father, Son 
and Holy Ghost. 

2. We believe, that Almighty God has made 
known his tnind and will to the children of men 
in his word; which word we believe to be of di- 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 43 

vine authority, and contains all things necessary 
to be known for the salvation of men and wo- 
men. The same is comprehended or contained 
in the books of the Old and New Testament, as 
are commonly received. 

3. We believe, that God, before the foundation 
of the world, for a purpose of his own glory, did 
elect a certain number of men and angels to eter- 
nal life; and that this election is particular, eter- 
nal and unconditional on the creature's part. 

4. We believe, that when God made man at 
first, he was perfect, holy, and upright, able to 
keep the law, but liable to fall, and that he stood 
as a federal head, or representative of all his na- 
tural offspring, and that they were to be partakers 
of the benefits of his obedience, or exposed to the 
misery which sprang from his disobedience. 

5. We believe, that Adam fell from this state 
of moral rectitude, and that he involved himself 
and all his natural offspring in a state of death; 
and for that original transgression, we all are both 
filthy and guilty in the sight of an holy God. 

6. We also believe, that it is utterly out of the 
power of men, as fallen creatures, to keep the 
law of God perfectly, repent of their sins truly, 
or believe in Christ, except they be drawn by the 
Holy Spirit. 

7 '. We believe, that in God's own appointed 
time and way (by means which he has ordained) 
the elect shall be called, justified, pardoned and 
sanctified; and that it is impossible they can ut- 
terly refuse the call, but shall be made willing, 
by divine grace, to receive the offers of mercy. 

8. W e believe, that justification in the sight of 
God is only by the imputed righteousness of Je- 



44 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

sus Christ, received and applied by faith alone. 

9. We believe in like manner, that God's elect 
shall not only be called, and justified, but that 
they shall be converted, born again, and changed 
by the effectual working of God's Holy Spirit. 

10. We believe, that sach as are converted, 
justified and called by his grace, shall persevere 
in holiness and never fall finally away. 

11. We believe it to be a duty incumbent on 
all God's people, to walk religiously in good 
works; not in the old covenant way of seeking 
life and the favor of the Lord by it; but only as a 
duty from a principle of love. 

12* We believe baptism and the Lord's supper 
are gospel ordinances, both belonging to the con- 
verted or true believers; and that persons who 
were sprinkled, or dipped, whilst in unbelief, 
were not regularly baptized according to God's 
word, and that such ought to be baptized after they 
are savingly converted into the faith of Christ. 

13. We believe that every church is indepen- 
dent in matters of discipline; and that associa- 
tions, councils and conferences of several minis- 
ters or churches, are not to impose on the chur- 
ches the keeping, holding or maintaining any 
principle or practice contrary to the church's 
judgment. 

14. We believe in the resurrection of the dead, 
both of the just and the unjust, and a general 
judgment. 

15. We believe the punishment of the wicked 
is everlasting, and the joys of the righteous are 
eternal* 

16. We believe that no minister has a right to 
the administration of the ordinances, only sucf* 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 45 

as are regularly called and come under imposi- 
tion of hands by the Presbytery. 

17. Lastly, we do believe, that for the mutual 
comfort, union and satisfaction of the several 
churches of the aforesaid faith and order, that 
we ought to meet in an Association way; where- 
in each church ought to represent tlieir case by 
their delegates, and attend as often as is neces- 
sary to advise with the several churches in con- 
ference; and that the decision of matters in such 
associations, not to be imposed, or in any wise 
binding on the churches, without their consent, 
but only to sit and act as an advisary council. 

These principles were adopted by the Asso- 
ciation at Elder James BelFs meeting house, on 
Sappony, Sussex county, Virginia; and after- 
wards re-examined and recommended by the As- 
sociation at Potacasy meeting house, in North- 
ampton county, North Carolina, 1778. 

At this Association on Sappony, Sussex coun- 
ty, being the first after the division took place at 
the Falls of Tar River, the following business 
was done: — 

The Association was opened by prayer, Elder 
John Meglamre chosen Moderator, Elder Lemu- 
el Burkitt Clerk. Letters from the several 
churches were read — all agreed in judgment 
about principles, and an answer given to the fol- 
lowing queries. 

Query 1. From the church in Chowan — Sup- 
pose a man to be a member of the Presbyterian 
ehurch, and therein ordained a minister of he 
gospel, and administrator of the ordinan es there- 
of with approbation of them in their way, aftet- 
' 5 



46 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

'Wards submits to believers baptism — is his ordi* 
nation valid io the Baptists** Answer. J\'o. 

2 From the church in the Isle of Wight-—* 
What shall a church do with a minister who labors 
io make them believe, that difference in judgment 
about water baptism, ought to be no bar to com^ 
munion } 

Ans. Such a practice is disorderly, and he who 
propagates the tenet ought to be dealt with as an 
offender. 

3. From brother Thompson's church — What 
shall a church do with a member, who is suspected 
to be gutlty of a fault and denies it, and no plain 
proof can be had, and yet circumstances appear 
very plainly that he is guilty? 

Ans. That if the church shall think that the 
circumstances are good, that they ought to act 
accordingly, and deal with him. 

The Association further agreed to hold two 
Associations yearly, viz: One in the spring, the 
other in the fall. It was also ordered that Elder 
Burkitt should procure a book and keep the re- 
cords of the Associations. The next Association 
appointed at Elder Burkitt's meeting house, in 
N«'rrhamptou county, on Potacasy creek, the 
Saturday before the third Sunday in May, 1778* 

Extracts from the Minutes of the Association held 
at Potacasy, May, 1778. 

Saturday, the 16th of May, the delegates from 
the several churches being assembled, Elder 
John M^glamre was chosen Moderator, and El- 
der h. Burkitt Clerk. The letters from the 
chual/cs being read, we proceeded to business. 

A church at Cashie, in Bertie county, N, C« 



Baptist association. 47 

under the pastoral care of Elder Jeremiah Dar- 
gan, presented a letter by their delegates, desir- 
ing admission into the x\ssociation; and some dif- 
ficulties appearing in the way, they were receiv- 
ed on condition of having a hearing of those diffi- 
culties afterwards in the Association. 

A church in Brunswick county, Virginia, un- 
der the care of Elder Moses Foster, on petition 
was received. 

Then adjourned till Monday morning. 

On Monday, the 18th of May, the Association 
being convened, those difficulties respecting the 
church under the care of Elder Dargan were ta- 
ken into consideration; and the Association resol- 
ved, that Elder James Bell, Jesse Read and l\ il- 
Ham Andrews be appointed to attend his meeting, 
und give advice, and further enquire into the 
state of the church, and returns be made to our 
next Association. 

Query 1. From Elder Burkitt's church — By 
what rule shall a church approve or disapprove of 
a minister's gijts^ who thinks he is called to the 
work of the ministry 6 ! 

Ans. We give it as our opinion, that if the fol- 
lowing things attend the ministry of a brother, 
that the church may approve of his gifts and en- 
courage him to go on in the work:, 1. If he preach 
the truth. 2. If his preaching tends to the con- 
viction and conversion of sinners. 3. If it be in- 
structive and consolatory to the people of God. 
And if need be, to call other ministers to the ex- 
amination of his call to that work. 

2 Is the marriage of servants lawful before 
God) which is not complied with according to the 
laws of the land"? Ans. Y$s+ 



4 A S HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

3. Is it duty to hold a member in fellowship ivho 
breaks the marriage of servants? Ans. No. 

Elders James Bell, John Meglamre and Za- 
chary Thompson were appointed to visit the Re- 
gular Baptist Association, viz: the churches we 
were formerly connected with, who had formed 
themselves into an Association, and in the most 
friendly manner endeavor to effect a reconcilia- 
tion between us. 

Before we conclude this chapter, we think it 
our duty to give our readers a brief account of 
the persecution that was against Elder John Tan- 
ner; and a few biographical sketches of Elder 
James Bell, who departed this life before the sit- 
ting of the next Association. 

Elder JOHJV TAJYJYER. 

A certain woman by the name of Dawson, itr 
the town of Windsor, N. C. had reason to hope 
her soul was converted, saw baptism to be a duty 
for a believer to comply with, and expressed a 
great desire to join the church at Cashie, under 
the care of Elder Dargan. Her husband, who 
was violently opposed to it, and a great persecu- 
tor, had threatened, that if any man baptized his 
wife he would shoot him; accordingly baptism 
was deferred for some considerable time. At 
length Elder Tanner was present at Elder Dar- 
gan's meeting, and Mrs. Dawson applied to the 
church for baptism, expressing her desire to com- 
ply with her duty. She related her experience, 
and was received; and as Elder Dargan was an 
infirm man, he generally when other ministers 
were present, would apply to them to administer 
the ordinance in his stead. He therefore request- 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. [49 

ed Elder Tanner to perform the duty of baptism 
at this time. Whether Elder Tanner was appri- 
zed of Dawson's threatening or not; or whether 
he thought it was his duty to obey God rather 
than man, we are not able to say; but so it was 
he baptized sister Dawson. And in June follow- 
ing, which was in the year 1777, Elder Tanner 
was expected to preach at Sandy Ruii meeting 
house, and Dawson hearing of the appointment, 
came up from Windsor to Norfleet's ferry on Ro- 
anoke, and lay in wait near the banks of the riv- 
er, and when Elder Tanner (who was in compa- 
ny with Elder Dargan) ascended the bank from 
the ferry landing, Dawson, being a few yards 
from him, shot hirn with a large horseman's pis- 
tol, and seventeen shot went into his thigh, one 
of which was a large buckshot, that went through 
his thigh, and lodged between his breeches and 
thigh on the other side. Elder Burkitt was pre- 
sent when the doctor (who was immediately sent 
for) took part of the shot out of his thigh. In this 
wounded condition Elder Tanner was carried to 
the house of Mr. Elisha Williams, in Scotland 
Neck, where be lay some weeks, and his life was 
despaired of; but thro' the goodness of God he 
recovered again. Dawson seemed somewhat af- 
frightened, fearing he would die, and sent a doc- 
tor up to attend him. And after Elder Tanner' 
recovered, he never attempted to seek for any 
recompense, but submitted to it patiently as 
persecution for Christ's sake. 

Elder JAMES BELL. 

Elder James Bell was born in Sussex county ,- 
Virginia, of parents who professed the Episcopal 
5* 



50 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

religion, but there was no great reason to be- 
lieve they were acquainted with an experience 
et' grace. He, as his parents before hirn had 
done, frequently attended the church of England, 
and complied with the forms of the church. He 
was a man of bright intellectuals, and at a very 
early period became popular in the county where 
he lived. He first received a commission in the 
military department; he was appointed Captain 
of a militia company; then a Justice of the Peace; 
and sometime after became Sheriff of the county. 
His popularity increasing, he gained the general 
esteem of every respectable character in Sussex, 
and the adjacent counties. He was at length SO7 
licited to offer himself a candidate for the Gene- 
ral Assembly, and accordingly did, and was elec-. 
ted by a large majority, and continued to repre- 
sent that county for some time. All the time he 
was anxiously pursuing popularity he had no 
concern about religion, nor anxiety for the salva- 
tion of his soul, until his brother Benjamin Bell, 
who had been for some time removed to the south, 
came in to see him. His brother Benjamin was 
converted, and had joined the Baptists in the 
south state, and when he came into Virginia and 
saw his brother James Bell, he told him what the 
Lord bad done for his soul, and what a miserable 
state he apprehended his brother to be in; inso- 
much that it took a very powerful effect on his 
brother, so that he never was truly satisfied until 
he had reason to hope the Lord had converted 
his soul. And he was then willing to part with 
all his worldly honor and preferments for that 
honor that comes from God only, He was bap- 
tised in Sussex county, by Elder John JVleglam^ 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 3» 

re, in the year 1770, and soon after became a 
zealous preacher of the gospel of our Lord Jesus 
Christ; and it is well known he always continu- 
ed a remarkable pious and zealous Christian un- 
til his death. He became a member, and took 
the care of the church on Sappony, in Sussex 
county, Virginia, which was formerly under the 
care of Elder John Rivers, and continued preach- 
ing and baptizing until September, 1778, when 
he died. In his last sickness, he said, he was 
apprehensive he should not be in his senses when 
he died. He therefore wished to have his chil- 
dren called together, that he might talk to them 
while he had the exercise of his reason. Which 
was accordingly done, and all his children, who 
were present, stood around him, and he very af- 
fectionately exhorted them all before he bid the 
world adieu! He requested Elder Burkitt (who 
was then present) to preach his funeral sermon 
from 1 Tim. i. 15: "This is a faithful saying, 
and worthy of all acceptation, that Christ Jesus 
came into the world to save sinners, of whom I 
am chief." It is this, said he, upon which my soul 
depends for life and salvation. He departed this 
life, September, 177S, aged about 43 years. 



CHAP. III. 

Some of the proceedings of the Association^ 
and remarkable events that took place from 
the year 177S until 1785. 2. The Decorum 
or Bates by which the Association is gover- 
ned, when made and adopted, and the Rules 
at large. 3. The nature of a Minister's 



52 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

Call lo the office of the Ministry, and the 
manner of his Ordination. 4. Biographi- 
cal sketches of Elder Jeremiah Dargan, who 
departed this life the 25th of December, 1 7S6. 

In the year 177S, September 28th, the Asso- 
ciation met at Elder Meglamre's meeting house, 
in Sussex county, Virginia. Elder Meglamre 
Moderator, Polder Burkitt Clerk. From the 
great respect we still had for our sister churches, 
which were formerly in union with us, it was 
resolved that Elders John Meglamre, Z.Thomp- 
son, and Elder Burkitt (instead of E4der Bell 
deceased, who was appointed by last Associa- 
tion) were at this Association appointed to visit 
those churches, and endeavor to effect a reconci- 
liation with them if possible, and returns be 
made to our next Association. 

A query proposed at this Association from, 
Elder BurkiU's church — Suppose a member is 
accused of a fault and denies it, and a person 
who is no t a member, and is not interested in 
the matter, has made oath before a Justice of 
the Peace that he is guilty — what shall a 
church do in that case? 

Ans. That the church shall judge of the vera- 
city of the person who swore, and the circum- 
stances attending it, and act accordingly thereto. 

At this time the churches began earnestly to 
desire a revival of religion, and sat apart two 
days of fasting and prayer, to solicit the throne of 
grace for a revival. 

The next Association was appointed at Fish- 
ing creek, at the new meeting house, on the Sa- 
turday before the third Sunday in May next. 

The Association met at the time and place be- 
fore mentioned, and on account of the present 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 53 

distress of our country, but few delegates met, 
and but little business was done. It was at this 
time we received information that the British 
were at Suffolk in Virginia, and had burned the 
town; and the people were fearful they were on 
the way to North Carolina, but the Association 
sat, and we continued a short space of time — 
The following business was done, viz: 

A church in Camden county, N, C, by their 
delegates, presented a letter to the Association 
desiring admission! On examination they were 
found to be an orderly church, and they were 
received. This church Was one of those which 
was formerly in union with us before the refor- 
mation took place, and was a very ancient respec- 
table church. It appears that this church had 
for some time believed the principles on which 
the reformation was grounded at first, but they 
did not so readily accede, to the measures which 
were fallen on at the Falls of Tar river, because 
their pastor Elder Henry Jibbott was baptized 
in unbelief, and had not vseen it his duty to com- 
ply with baptism since he was converted; but 
before this Association, which was holden at 
Fishing Creek, he complied with his duty, and 
a reformation in that church, in this respect, took 
place, and they have again united with us. 
Blessed be God for the union of saints. 

It was at this time that the church under the 
care of Elder Dargan. was received. All those 
difficulties before mentioned, which were for 
some time a bar to their being admitted, were all 
removed. 

By reason of the distress in our country, and 
the molestation of our enemies, being the time 
of the war, we were prevented from holding any 



54 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

regular Association, of which we have the min- 
utes, until the Saturday before the 4th Sunday in 
May, 1782, which was holden at Mr. •Arthur* 
Cot ten *s, in Hertford County, North Carolina. 

Saturday, 25th May, 17S2. The Associa- 
tion being open, Elder Meglamre was chosen 
Moderator, Elder Burkitt Clerk. A church irr 
Pitt county, under the care of Elder John Page, 
presented a letter by their delegates, desiring 
admission into the Association, and were receiv- 
ed. Also the church at the Falls of Tar River 
was received. And also the church in Edge- 
combe, under the care of Elder Joshua Barnes; 
and one in the county of Currituck, North Caro- 
lina, under the care of Elder James Gamewellj 
were received. 

Elders Silas Mercer, Abraham Marshall and 
David Barrow were appointed to preach on the 
Sunday. 

The Clerk was requested fo prepare a Deco- 
rum for the Association, and present it on Mon- 
day morning. 

Monday morning, 27th May, 1782, the deco- 
rum, or rules of the Association, which the Clerk 
had prepared, was read and approved of. A co- 
py of which is as follows, viz: 

1. The Association shall be opened and closed by 
prayer. 

2. A Moderator and Clerk shall be chosen by the 
suffrage of the members. 

3. Only one person shall speak at once, who shall 
rise from his seat and address the Moderator when 
he makes his speech. 

4. rhe person thus speaking shall not be interrup- 
ted m his speech by any, except the Moderator, till 
he be done speaking. 

5. He shall strictly adhere to the subject, and in 
no wise reflect on the person who spoke before, so as 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 55 

to make remarks on his slips, failings or imperfec- 
tions; but shall fairly state the case and matter as 
nearly as he can, so as to convey his light or ideas. 

6. No person shall abruptly break off, or absent 
himself from the business of the Association, without 
liberty obtained from it. 

7. No person shall rise and speak more than three 
times to one subject, without liberty from the Asso- 
ciation. 

8. No member of the Association shall have liber- 
ty to be whispering or laughing in time of a public 
speech. 

9. No member of this Association shall address 
another, in any other terms or appellations but the 
title of Brother. 

10. The Moderator shall not interrupt any mem- 
ber in, nor prohibit him from speaking, till he give 
his light on the subject, except he break the rules of 
this decorum. 

1L The names of the several members of the As- 
sociation shall be enrolled by the Clerk, and called 
over as often as the Association requires. 

12. The Moderator shall be the last person who 
may speak to the subject; and may give his light on 
it, if he please, before he puts the matter to a vote. 

13. Yny member who shall willingly and knowing- 
ly break any of these rules, shall be reproved by the 
Association, as they shall see proper. 

These rules being confirmed and established, 
we then proceeded to business; wherein there 
was much disputing about the power of Associ- 
ations their business and foundation. But at 
last there was a unanimity among the whole up- 
on the following plan, v'z: The Association did 
agree th^t we should answer queries when ap- 
proved, when presented by a member of the As- 
sociation and not as coming from the church; 
and tbr proceedings of the A-sociation to be re- 
tu medio writing to the respective churches. 
Here a motion was made for a diyision h\ the 



56 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

Association, but the Association did not agree to 
it. But for conveniency the Association advised 
that four general Conferences should be holden, 
at different places, and that the churches conve- 
nient might represent themselves in those Con- 
ferences, and their proceedings be transmitted to 
the annual Association. Accordingly (he four 
following were appointed, viz: At Elder Me- 
glamre's meeting house, the Saturday before the 
second Sunday in August; at Yoppim, the Sat- 
urday before the fourth Sunday in August; at 
Camden, the Saturday before the first Sunday in 
September; at Elder Page's, the Saturday before 
the second Sunday in September. 

The next annual Association to ?be at Davis's 
meetinghouse, on Roanoke, in Halifax county, 
North Carolina, the Saturday before the last 
Sunday in May, 1783. 

According to appointment, the Association 
met at Davis's meeting house; at which time and 
place the following business was done. 1. They 
thought proper to set aside the practice of gene- 
ral Conferences, and appointed four occasional 
Associations in their stead; and for each church 
convenient to represent their case by letters and 
delegates, and consult the affairs of the churches; 
and the minutes of these Associations to be 
transmitted to an annual Association, w r here all 
the churches which possibly could, should at- 
tend. 2. The following queries were answered 
at this Association, viz: 

Query 1. By Elder Mercer— Is washing feel 
an ordinance of Christ's church which oughl 
to be continued in the church? 

Aii*. We, look upon it a duty to be continued 
in the church. 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 57 

2. By brother Peter Mercer — Has a church of 
Christ any right to try causes of a civil nature? 

Ans. We look upon it that the church has a 
right, from God's word, to try all causes which 
may arise amongst themselves. 

3. The proceedings of the general Conferences 
appointed by the last annual Association, and 
which were held last year, were read in this Assa- 
ciation, and the minutes ordered to be recorded in 
the Association book. Queries of consequence an- 
swered at these Conferences were as follows, viz: 

Query 1. By brother Lancaster, in the Confer- 
ence at Elder Meglamre's meeting house — Has a 
church any right to suspend a member from commu- 
nion, who has been guilty of a crime, and still hold 
him as a member of the chuvch? 

Ans. As our Lord in the 18th of St, Matthew's 
gospel, has given a sufficient rule to deal with of- 
fending members, we generally think there is no de- 
gree of church censure to be inflicted on an impe- 
nitent member, after a public hearing in the church, 
besides excommunication; which we believe consists 
in putting him out of communion and membership. 

2. Has a church any authority from God's word, 
io lay it upon their minister to get up in a congrega* 
tion, and publish the excommunication of a disorder- 
ly member? 

Ans. We think 4 hat the offending member being 
dealt with in a public conference, is sufficient with- 
out any more publication. 

3. By brother Shelly — What way is thought best 
for a church to act in supporting their minister? 

Ans. That each member ought to contribute vol- 
untarily, according to his or her ability; and in no 
wise by taxation or any other compulsion. 

4. What method shall be taken with a member, 

6 



5S HISTORY 07 the XEHUKEE 

who shall rent himself off from his own church and 
join another? 

Ans. We think it is disorderly for a member to 
rent himself off from his own church, and disorder- 
ly for a church to receive him. 

5. Is the baptism of a believer, a legal baptism^ 
if performed by an unauthorised minister? 

Ans. It is our opinion, that the person who ad- 
ministered the ordinance was very much out of his 
duty, and displeasure ought to be shown to such a 
practice: but as for the person's baptism, as it was 
done in faith, we esteem it legal. 

6. By Elder Abbot, in the Conference at Yop- 
pim — Is a person who is called to the work of the 
ministry, in his duty to travel out into different parts 
of (he ivorld, to preach without a letter from his 
church, signifying their approbation of his personal 
conduct, and call to the ministry? 

Ans. We do not think they are in their duty,. ' 

7. By Elder Burkitt, in the Conference at Cam- 
den — -What shall a church do with a member, who 
shall absent himself from the communion of the 
hordes supper? 

Ans. That it is the duty of the church to enquire 
into the reason of his thus absenting himself from 
the communion, and if he does not render a satis- 
factory reason the church shall deal with him. 

8. By brother Forbes-^- What number of mem- 
bers can be thought sufficient, in an arm, branch or 
wing of a church, in order for their constitution? 

Ans. We give it as our opinion, that a number of 
members who are capable to carry on a proper dis- 
cipline in a church, are sufficient for a constitution. 

9. Has an itinerant minister, who has not the 
care of a church, a right to baptize on any occasion? 

Ans. We suppose be has not a right on all gc^ 



i 



Baptist association. 49 

casions, but only on some. The occasions which 
we conceive he has a right to baptize on, are as 
follow, viz: 1. When he visits a church destitute of 
a pastor, and is called by the church to baptize. 
2. When he travels into dark places, destitute of 
ministerial helps, and persons get converted and 
desire baptism of him, and they are not capable to 
make application to any church by reason of their 
distance from them. 

After the Association had heard and approved 
of the proceedure of these general Conferences, 
they then appointed their next annual Association, 
which was to be holden at Sandy Run, in Bertie 
county, N. C. the Saturday before the third Sun- 
day in Mav, 1784. 

By a resolve of -this Association there were four 
occasional associations to be holden in 1783, viz: 
At Ballard's Bridge in August, at Camden in Sep- 
tember, at South Quay in October, and at the new 
meeting house on Fishing Creek the Saturday be- 
fore the third Sunday in September, and the min- 
utes to be transmitted to the annual Association. 

Extracts from the minutes of these occasional Asso- 
ciations. 

At the Association at Ballard's Bridge, the Al- 
lowing queries were answered, viz: 

Query 1. By Elder Burkitt — Is it agreeable to 
GofPs word, for Christians to marry unconverted 
persons? 

Ans. W r edo not know that God's word does ac- 
tually forbid such marriages, but we would advise 
the members of our churches to comply with chris- 
tian marriages, as nearly as they can judge, for 
their own comfort and satisfaction. 

2. What shall the master of a family do with his 



60 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

slaves, who refuse to attend at the time of public* 
prayers in the family? 

Ans. We think it is the duty of every master of 
a family to give his slaves liberty to attend the 
worship of God in his family; and likewise it is his 
duty to exhort them to it, and endeavor to con- 
vince them of their duty; and then leave them to 
their own choice. 

3. By Elder Welsh — Is it thought regular for a 
church, to restore a Deacon upon repentance, froin 
suspension to office, as well as to membership? 

Ans. It is our opinion, that if the church be 
fully satisfied with his conduct in executing his 
office before, that they may restore him to office a- 
gain, as well as to membership. 

4. By Elder Burkitt — What way is thought best 
for a church to put members upon a trial of their gifts, 

who think they are called to the work of the min- 
istry? 

Ans. We judge it necessary that all miuisters 
should be called of God to preach the gospel, and 
when any member thinks he has a call to preach, he 
ought to inform his church of it; and then we 
would advise the church to deal very tenderly with 
him, and give him all the encouragement necessa- 
ry: and we would advise that brother to follow the 
direction of the church with respect to the manner 
of beginning to preach. 

At the occasional Association held on Fishing 
Creek the same year, a church on Black-Creek, in 
Wayne county, N. C. petitioned for admission in- 
to the Association, and was received. And at this 
Association the following queries were answered. 

Quere 1. By Elder Meglamre — What shall a 
church require of a person for satisfaction, who had 
been excommunicated from another church at a great 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 61 

distance, and now being removed convenient to them 
and desires fellowship with them'? 

Ans. That such a person ought (if possible)" 
by a letter of recommendation from the churcb 
where he lives, apply to the church from which he 
was excommunicated, and regain fellowship with 
them, and the« take a letter of dismission from 
them, and join the church amongst whom he livest 

2. What are the essentials oj church communion*? 

Ans. That a person shall, before being admit- 
ted to commune, give a satisfactory account of his 
being savingly converted 10 the Lord Jesus Christ, 
and publicly declare the same by being regularly 
baptized by immersion. 

At the occasional Association at South-Quay 
very little was done, except a motion for a division 
in the Association; which was rejected. 

The annual Association at Sandy* Run, 
The 15th of May s 1784, the annual Association 
commenced at Sandy-Run meeting-bouse, Bertie 
county, North-Carolina. The Association was o- 
pened by prayer — Elder Meglamre was chosen 
Moderator, and Elder Burkitt, Clerk. Then pro-- 
ceeded to business. A church in Pitt county, un- 
der the care of Elder Abram Baker, on petition was 
received into the Association. Elders Jesse Read, 
John Meglamre, Philip Hughes and David Bar- 
row were appointed to preach on Sunday 

This Association agreed to correspond with the 
Salisbury Association, in Maryland, by letter and 
delegate. Elder Edward Mintz was appoin- 
ted our delegate. Elder Barkitt was requested to 
prepare letters to the Salisbury Association, and to 
the general committee at Dover, in Virginia. An 
answer to the following queries were* given, viz. 
0* 



62 HISTORY op the KEHOKBE 

Query 1. Ts a Pastor or Bishop of a church 
bound by the word of God, to the congregation he 
agrees to take the oversight of for life; or is he in 
this case at liberty to be governed by his inclination, 
interest, or what he may suppose to be a call from 
God. Yea or nay? 

After debating the query some time, and it ap- 
pearing ambiguous, by f+ie consent of the Associa- 
tion the query was altered to read thus — 

Is it thought that a Bishop, or Pastor of a church, 
stands upon the same footing in the church as any 
other member, with respect to his having a right to at 
dismission on his request? 

Ans. It is our opinion that as a member he is 
accountable to the church, and as a minister he is 
accountable to God. 

2. Is it agreeable to gospel rule and order, to call 
a minister to take the pastoral care of a church, 
without the unanimous consent of the members of said 
church? 

Ans. We think they ought to be unanimous. 

The A ssociation agreed to hold only one occasion- 
al Association this year, which was appointed at 
Fishing Creek, Daniel's meeting-house, the Sat- 
urday before the second Sunday in October. The 
annual Association was appointed next at Shoul- 
der's Hill, in Virginia. 

At the occasional Association on Fishing-Creek, 
a church in Craven county, N. C. under the care 
of Elder James Brinson, joined the Association. 
Also another in said county on Swift Creek, was 
received. Another in Franklin county, formerly 
under the care of Elder William Walker, presen- 
ted a letter, setting forth their desire to be in un- 
ion with us, and wished to know what were those 
bars which heretofore subsisted between the ch f up 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 63 

cbes. Accordingly information was given. This 
church was one of the Regular Baptist Association 
which was formerly in union with us. 

Extracts from the annual Association holdcn at 
Shoulder's Hill. 

Saturday, the 14th of May, 1785, the Associa- 
tion met at Shoulder's Hill, in Nansemond county, 
in Virginia, and after it was opened by prayer, El- 
der Meglamre was chosen Moderator, and Elder 
Burkitt Clerk. 

Letters from 21 churches were read. 

A church at the Northwest river bridge, in Nor- 
folk county, Virginia, a church at Shoulder's Hill, 
a church on Scuppernong, in Tyrrel county, N. C. 
a church at Pungo, Princess-Anne county, Virgin- 
ia, and a church on Blackwater* Princess-Anne, 
were all received in this Association. 

Elders John Leland, Lemuel Burkitt, David Bar- 
row and Jonathan Barnes, were appointed to 
preach on Sunday. 

On motion of Elder Barrow, the engrossed bill, 
respecting a general assessment, was taken into 
consideration; and on motion of Elder Leland, a 
petition of the inhabitants of Charles-City county, 
Virginia, was read; and the Association advised 
that this petition, or one similar thereto, should be 
adopted by the delegates of this Association who 
reside in Virginia, and be presented to the inhabit- 
ants of their respective counties, and when they 
have gotten a sufficient number of subscribers, be 
presented to the General Assembly of Virginia. 

Here at this Association, the churches were still 
sensible of the declining state of religion, accord- 
ingly*** day of fasting and prayer was appointed, 
to solicit the throne of grace for a revival. 



64 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

The next Association was appointed at Kehukee, 
the Saturday before the second Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1785. 

At this Association the most of the churches 
complained of coldness in religion, a few informed 
us of a great stir amongst them. 

A church at South-Quay, in Virginia, a church 
at Bear-Creek, in Dobbs county, N. C. a church 
in the upper end ofTyrrel county, on Morattuck, 
were received into membership in this Association. 

On motion of Elder Read, Elders John Meg- 
lamre and Jesse Read, and brothers Charles Cham- 
pion and Thomas Gardner, were appointed a com- 
mittee to meet the Regular Baptist brethen in con- 
ference, to endeavour to effect a reconciliation with 
them. 

Elders David Barrow, Lemuel Burkitt, John 
Meglamre and Jonathan Barns were appointed to 
preach on Sunday. 

Query 1. Has a woman any right to speak in the 
church in matters of discipline^ unless called upon? 

Ans. We think they have no right unless called 
upon, or where it respects their own communion. 

In consequence of a motion made by Elder J. 
JVrCabe, the Association thought proper to advise 
the several churches ( in order to remove the gen- 
eral complaint of coldness in religion) to set apart 
some time every day, between sun-set and dark, to 
be engaged in private prayer to the Lord for a re- 
vival of religion. 

The next Association is to be holden at the house 
of brother Joshua Freeman, in Bertie county, May, 
1736. 

We shall conclude this chapter, by shewing the 
nature of a minister's call to the office of the minis- 
try, and the manner of, his ordination; and a few 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. tf 

Sketches of the biography of Elder Dargan, who 
departed this life the 25ih of December, 1786. 

A Minister's Call and Ordination. 
It is by many thought absolutely necessary that 
the first qualification of a minister of the gospel 
should be a classical education; and such persons 
think that a minister cannot be qualified to preach 
the gospel except he be a man of erudition. But 
is it not evident, that many who have spent years 
in the schools to acquire a liberal education, and 
yet notwithstanding all their acquirements, are ig- 
norant of the true knowledge of God, and are un* 
acquainted with the spiritual meaning of his word. 
"The natural man receiveth not the things of the 
spirit of God, neither can he know them, for they 
are spiritually discerned." t Cor ii. 14. u And 
the wisdom of this world is foolishness with God*" 
chap. iii. 19. Learning is a very good handmaid, 
but we are far from supposing that it is essentially 
necessary for a man to be acquainted with the ori- 
ental languages before he is qualified to preach the 
gospel. Many may be acquainted with these lan- 
guages, and yet be, as a poor African told a young 
gentleman, "I perceive (said he) that there are ma- 
ny learned fools." Upon the whole, we suppose 
that it hs necessary every minister of Christ should, 
in the first place, be truly converted, and regenera- 
ted by the grace of God, that he have a general 
acquaintance with the word of God, and that he 
should be called of God to preach the gospel. : 'No 
man taketh this honor to himself, but he that is 
called of God, as was Aaron." Heb. v. 4. An ev- 
idence of his call, for his own satisfaction, is, first, 
if his views in preaching the gospel be not for the 
sake of lucre, nor for honor nor applause; but, se- 



66 HISTORY of the KEMUKEE 

condly, if he aim at the glory of God and the good 
of souls. An evidence of his call, to the satisfac* 
tion of others, is, first, his spiritual understanding 
in the word of God; second, his ability in explain- 
ing the meaning of the word; third, the success of 
his ministry in the conviction and conversion of 
sinners, and comfort of the saints. It is necessary 
that a person thus called to the ministry, should 
preach on trial for some time, and when the church 
is satisfied with his call and usefulness, he shall then 
be set apart by fasting and prayer, by the hands of 
the Presbytery, in manner and form something like 
the following example: — 

1. It is necessary that a fast should be observed. 
Acts, x'ui. 3. 2. That a Presbytery of two minis- 
ters, at least, should be present. 

The day appointed for ordination being come, 
and the church being assembled, a sermon shall be 
delivered by one of the ministers, suitable to the 
occasion. The sermon being over, the solemnity 
may begin with singing a suitable hymn, and pray- 
er to Almighty God. Then one of the ministers 
standing up, ought to address the candidate and 
church after this manner: "When the church at Je- 
rusalem, the mother of us all, had chosen men to of- 
fice, it is recorded that they set them before the A- 
postles to be ordained, by laying on of hands and 
prayers; we desire, therefore, that this church will 
set before us the man whom they have chosen to the 
ministry " 

Then let some of the church conduct the can- 
didate to the ministers^ and one of them may 
address him in this manner: — 

"The regard we pay to that sacred charge, lay 
hands suddenly on no man^ obliges ns to use caution 
*— Sir, we would be certified of your call to preach." 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 67 

The candidate may relate his call, or present 
,a copy of his call, and it may be read. 

"YVe would also see yoar license, which may be 
to us a testimony of your good morals, and the ap- 
probation which your ministerial abilities have ob- 
tained." 

Let the licejise be read, or let the church testify. 

Then add, "Hitherto your advances towards the 
ministry appear to have been regular and fair, but we 
are obliged to seek for further satisfaction, which you 
alone are capable of giving: permit me therefore to 
ask you — Do you, Sir, willingly, and not by con- 
straint, out of a ready mind, and not for filthy lu- 
cre, devote yourself to the sacred office?" 

The candidate shall answer, that the minis- 
try to him is of free choice^ and that his view is 
not lucrative. 

"Do you believe that you are moved hereto by 
the spirit of God, so that a necessity is laid on you 
to preach the gospel, and that a wo will be to you if 
you preach it not?" 

The candidate shall answer the question in the 
affirmative. 

"Do you take the Bible to be the word of God, 
in such a sense as to hold yourself bound to believe 
all it declares; to do all it requires of you as a 
christian; to abstain from all it forbids? Do you 
consider that book as the only rule of faith and 
practice in matters of religion; and a sufficient rule, 
so that there is no occasion for any other judge of 
controversies; or for creeds, confessions of* faith, 
traditions, or acts of councils of any denominations, 
to supply its supposed defects? Do you hold that 
book as your creed or confession of faith ; and will 
you make it your directory, whether in preaching, 
administering ordinances, exercising government 



63 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

£nd discipline, or in performing any other branch 
Qf your function? 

The candidate shall confess that he owns it as 
the word of God, and that his resolution is to be 
directed by it as a christian, and as a minister. 

After this the candidate shall be desired to kneel, 
and the ministers lay their hands on him, and pray, 
each of them. Then the ministers to withdraw 
their hands, and when the ordained person rises, to 
Salute him in the following manner: — 

"We honor you, dear brother, in the presence of 
all the people, and give you the right hand of fel- 
lowship as a token of brotherhood and congratula- 
tion, and wish you success in your office, and an an- 
swer to those prayers which two or three have hear- 
tily agreed on earth to put up for you." 

Then the solemnity is to be concluded by a 
charge given to the ordained minister, and a certifi- 
cate of his ordination as follovVs: — 

State of North Carolina, 1 FT1HIS may certify, that 
Bertie county. y mL A. B. (a minister of the 

Baptist society, and a member of the church in the 
county and State aforesaid, being before proved and re- 
commended by said church) was set apart by fasting 
and prayers, on the 5d day of October, 1803, by the im- 
position of hands of C. D. E. F. and G. H. ministers of 
the gospel, who were called as a Presbytery for that 
purpose, whereby the said A. B. is ordained a minister 
of the gospel, and entitled to the administration of all 
(he ordinances thereof. Witness our hands the day 
and date above written. G. D. 

E. F. 

G. K. 

Etier JEREMIAH DARGAJY. 

Elder Jeremiah Dargan was converted and 
baptized in the south state, but divine Providence 
so ordered that he should move in, and become a 
resident in Bertie county. N. C. The manner and 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 6</ 

means by which it was effected through the divine 
agency of Him, who worketh all things according 
to the counsel of his own will, was sister Dargan, 
whose name before married was Anne Moore, who 
resided at Cashie, in Bertie county, got converted, 
and as there was no administrator near to adminis- 
ter baptism, she travelled into the State of South 
Carolina, under a sense of duty and a desire to 
comply with it. Here she met with Elder Dargan, 
whom she soon after married, and he moved into 
Bertie county. He was a remarkable pious chris- 
tian, and a very zealous minister of the gospel. He 
was so tender hearted, that it was hardly ever 
known he preached a sermon without plentifully 
shedding tears; so that he could say with the Apos- 
tle Paul, For the space of three years I have warn* 
ed every one, night and day, with tears Acts, xx, 31. 
Elder Dargan was an instrument of first planting 
the gospel at Cashie, and of first gathering that 
church. He did not continue a great many years 
amongst them, but his labors were wonderfully 
blessed amongst that people, and in that part of the 
country near Wiccacon. He was a means, in the 
hands of God, of planting that church, called Wic- 
cacon church, now under the care of Elder Hendry. 
Being greatly afflicted, he did not travel much; 
and towards the latter end of his days he was grie- 
vously afflicted with the gravel, of which heat last 
died. He was very patient in his affliction, submis- 
sive to the will of divine providence, and expressed 
a desire to depart and to be with Christ, which was 
far better. He departed this life on the 25th of 
December, 1786. He requested that Eldei Bur* 
kitt should preach his funeral sermon, and that a 
copy of the sermon should be written (as nearly as 
could) for the benefit of his friends. Accordingly 
7 



9» HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

Elder Burkitt attended at his funeral solemnity, 
and preached to a crowded audience, from Luke, 
ii. 29, 30: "Lord, now lettest thou thy servant de- 
part in peace, according to thy word: For mine 
eyes have seen thy salvation," The sermon after- 
wards was printed. 



XIHAP. IV. 

1 . Proceedings of the Association until 1789. 2, 
Proceedings of the Association at Whitfield's 
meeting house. The junction of the Regular 
Baptist Churches with us, and the names to be 
buried in oblivion; and the Association to be here" 
after known by the name of the "United Baptist 
Association" 3. The Constitution of the Asso- 
ciation, and Form of Government. 4. Proceed- 
ings until the Division took place at Davis's 
meeting house in 1790. 5. Remarks on the Di- 
vision. 6. Biographical Sketches of Elaers 
Samuel Harrel and Henry Abbot. 

On the 20th of May, 17S6, the Association met 
at brother Joshua Freeman's, in Bertie county, N. 
C. The Asscoiation was opened by prayer, Elder 
John Meglamre was chosen Moderator, Elder Bur- 
kin Clerk. Letters from twenty-one churches were 
read. They mostly complained of coldness; but 
there were added to the churches since last Asso- 
ciation nearly seventy members. Here, a church 
at Knobscrook, in Pasquotank count} 7 , N. C. and 
one in Brunswick county. Virginia, on Fountain's 
Creek, were received into the Association. 

Ejder Head, who was appointed (with som| 



baptist association, fi 

others) to attend a committee of the Regular Bap- 
fist Society, informed the Association that be at- 
tended the committee, and made to them the fol- 
lowing proposals: 

1. We think that none but believers in Christ 
have a right to the ordinance of baptism; there- 
fore we will not hold communion with those who 
plead for the validity of baptism in unbelief. 

2. We leave every church member to judge for 
himself whether he was baptised in unbelief or not. 

3. We leave every minister at liberty to baptize, 
or not, such persons as desire to be baptized, be- 
ing scrupulous about their former baptism. 

The Association concurred with the report; and 
recommended those propositions to the several 
churches in our union, and desired their opinion 
thereon. 

Query 1. Is it legal to administer the Lord's sup- 
per to a single person, in case of inability to attend 
public worship'? 

Ans. We believe it may be lawful in some cases. 

2. Is it orderly for a church to hold communion 
with a member who frequents the Freemason Lodge? 

Ans. We think it disorderly. 

The next Association to be holden at South 
Quay, in Virginia, the first Sunday in October 
1786. 

On the 30th day of September, being the Satur- 
day before the first Sunday in October, 1786, the 
Association met at South Quay* The following 
business done: 

A church at Black Creek, Southampton county, 
Virginia, was received. 

On motion of Elder Barrow, a committee of six, 
viz: Elders iMeglamre, Barrow, Aiintz, Stansil, Eth- 
eridge and Read, were appointed to devise ways 



72 HISTORY of the KEHUKEB 

and means for the encouragement of Itinerant 
preaching. On Monday the 2d of October, the 
committee reported that they were divided in their 
sentiments, and had concluded on nothing decisive. 
Whereupon it was ordered that Elder Meglamre, 
the chairman of said committee, report the difficul- 
ties which occasioned the division as aforesaid; and 
after hearing those difficulties and considering them, 
the Association ordered that the proceedings of 
said committee be entered on the Minutes of the 
Association, and be transmitted to the different 
churches for their consideration and approbation; 
and they were requested to' signify their minds to 
the next Association. The proceedings were as 
follow, viz: 

1. From the frequent requests, in the church let- 
ters to the Association, we think it necessary that 
four ministers be appointed to visit the churches in 
Our connection, each one to go through the church- 
es twice in one year. 

2. For the support of those ministers, we think 
necessary for the Association to advise the congre- 
gations thus visited, to contribute as they may think 
to be duty; and favour the next Association with 
an account of what they shall do far that purpose. 

3. That the said Itinerants equally partake of 
the bounty of the people. 

4. That this work be begun the 1st day of No- 
vember, at South Quay- 

Query 1, Has a church a right to excommunicate 
a member on the single testimony of a worldling, in 
any case? 

Ans, No: unless corroborating circumstances 
be sufficient to induce the church to believe the tes- 
timony to be true. 

At this Association the churches agreed to divide* 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 73 

in a measure — that is, they agreed to hold one As- 
sociation in Virginia in the spring, and the Caroli- 
na Association in the fall; and that each Associa- 
tion shall send five ministers, and each of the min- 
isters to take with hiin one of the members of his 
church, as a delegate; and that either of the Associ- 
ations ma} 7 dismiss or receive any church in the 
connection for the sake of conveniency. 

Xhe next Asssociation in Virginia to be at Foun- 
tain's Creek in May; and the Carolina Association 
to be at Daniel's meeting-house, on Fishing Creek, 
in October next. 

On the 19th of May, 1787, the Association met 
at Fountain's Creek. 

A church at Otterdam's, Sussex county, Virgin^ 
ia, was received. 

This Association agreed to reconsider the busi- 
ness of itinerant preaching. A- committee was ap- 
pointed for that purpose, and after deliberation 
thereon, reported as follows: 

1. It is thought expedient that every quarterly 
meeting should be attended by some neighbouring 
itinerant preacher. 

2. That not only ordained preachers, but young 1 
gifts also be advised and called upon by the church 
to which they belong, to engage in the work, not 
only amongst the churches, but in other places 
w here it may appear necessary. 

S. That as many appointments as can be conve- 
niently attended, be by the present Association 
made, in order to begin the work'.. 

An amendment to these rules was proposed by 
Elder Barrow, and concurred with by the Associa- 
tion, viz: 

That this Association would recommend it to th^ 
several churches to search among themselves fo$ 



74 HISTORY o* the KEHUKEK 

such members as have useful gifts, and pressingly 
Jay it upon them to exercise them without delay. 

Query 1. What number of ministers are svf 
ficient to compose a Presbytery? 

Ans. Two or mora 

The next Virginia Association appointed at El- 
der Meglamre's meeting house, in Sussex county, 
on the Saturday before the third Sunday in May 
next. 

On the Saturday before the second Sunday in Oc> 
toner, 17S7, the Carolina Association met at Dan- 
iel's meeting house, on Fishing Creek. Elder 
Meglamre Moderator, Elder Burkitt Clerk. 

At this Association a church in Martin county, 
under the care of Elder Martin Ross, was received 
into the Association. 

Query I. What measures shall a Deacon take* 
who sees the necessity of the minister's support, 
and his conscience binds him to do his duty, in 
consequence of which he frequently excites the 
brethren to their duly; yet after all, to his daily 
grief he finds they neglect their duty? 

Ans. It is our opinion that it is the members 
duty voluntarily to contribute to the minister's 
support, and if the Deacon discovers any member 
remiss in his duty that he shall cite him to the 
qJiurch; and if the church finds him negligent in 
his duty, we give it as our advice, that the church 
should deal with him for covetousness. 

The churches were requested, both in Carolina 
and Virginia, to send in their letters to our next As- 
sociation, whether they approve of a division of the 
Association, according to the proceedings at Soutfc 
Quay in 17S6. 

On the Saturday before the third Sunday in 
May, 178S, the Association convened at Elder Me- 
gkmre's meeting house, in Sussex ; Virginia. EK 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION*. 75 

der xMeglamre chosen Moderafor, Elder Burkitt 
Clerk. 

A church at Seacock, in Sussex county, a church 
near the Cut Banks, on Nottoway, Dinwiddie 
county, a church in the same county, on Rowanty, 
and a church on Great Creek, in Brunswick coun- 
ty, Virginia, were received into the Association. 

On motion of Elder Barrow, a committee was , 
appointed to examine the minds of the delegates 
from South Quay church, respecting a certain sen- 
tence in their letter to this Association. On exa- 
mination of the delegates, the committee reported 
as follows, viz: 

That this church had adopted a certain plan for 
discharging their duty towards travelling preach- 
ers by a public fund; which plan the church re- 
commended to the approbation or disapprobation 
of this Association. 

The plan was as follows, viz: — 

"By raising a fund, in the first place, by their own 
contribution. 2. By public collections from the inhabi- 
tants, twice in the year at least. Which money so col- 
lected and deposited in the hands of some person, and 
subject to the orders of the church, to be appropriated 
to the aid of any and every travelling preacher, whom 
they shall judge to be sent of God to preach. And they 
conceive that such a plan, with them alone (beautiful 
as it appears) will not answer the desired purpose; 
therefore have thought it necessary to present it to this 
Association for their approbation." 

Upon a further investigation of the matter, the 
Association determined that the plan proposed, be 
inserted in the minutes of the Association, and the 
following answer be prefixed:— 

The Association after a mature deliberation up- 
on the matter, do think that according to scripture, 
there ought to be some provision made in the chur- 
ches for the ministry; and therefore thought it im- 
proper to decide on the proposed plan; but do rev 



76 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

commend it to the consideration of the different 
churches for their approbation or disapprobation. 

On the mature consideration of the division of 
the Association, it was thought expedient for the- 
two bodies to be again united in one as formerly: 
And it was also resolved that there should be two 
Associations in the year; one in Virginia, the other 
in Carolina; one in the spring, the other in the fall. 
And that they should be appointed by the respec* 
tive brethren in each State, when and where they 
please; i. e. the brethren belonging to Virginia to 
appoint the Association in their State, and the bre- 
thren in Carolina to have the privilege of appoint- 
ing the Association in that State; and that every 
church in each State be under an obligation to at- 
tend each Association, in each State, according to 
their former compact, before the division took place. 

The next Association, in Virginia^ is appointed 
the Saturday before the third Sunday in May, I7S9. 

The Association, in Carolina, met the Saturday- 
before the second Sunday in October, 173S, at the 
Falls of Tar River. -: 

Elder Meglamre was chosen Moderator, and El- 
der Burkitt Clerk. 

A church on Newport River, in Carteret county; 
and one on New River, in Onslow county, under 
the care of Elder Robert Nixon, were received. 

On motion, the Association was requested to 
give their opinion what they believe the real work 
of a Deacon is. 

AnSi That we think that there ought to be such 
offirers in the church, as Deacons, and that theis 
work is to serve tables. That is, the table of the 
Lord; the table of the minister; and the table of the 
poor. And for to see that the church makes prop- 
er provision for them. 

Query 1 . How far can a church that has no gas~ 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 77 

ior, or ordained minister, (though they have some 
other ordained officers) proceed in discipline to re- 
ceive or turn out members, and be orderly in their 
proceedings*} 

Ans. We think that such an organized church* 
has fall power to receive persons to baptism, and 
call upon an authorized minister to baptize them; 
and that such a church has full power to excommu- 
nicate disorderly members. 

j2. Suppose a man should be married to a woman 
who was under twelve years old, he knowing her 
age when he married her; and should afterwards 
forsake her, and marry another: Can such a man 
be justifiable in so doing; or ought that man to be 
held in the fellowship of a gospel church? Ans. No. 

Whereas the church at Kehukee are fallen into 
disorder, and stand in great need of our assistance, 
to advise them to such suitable measures as they 
may think proper to effect their union again. 

It is ordered that Elders Burkitt, Read and 
White, be a committee to attend said church, and 
propose suitable measures for that purpose. 

It was the opinion of this Association, that those 
bars, which heretofore subsisted between the Bap- 
tists amongst us, formerly called Regulars and Sep- 
arates, be taken down; and a general union and 
communion take place according to the terms pro- 
posed at brother Joshua Freeman's, in Bertie 
county, May, 1786; and that the names Regular 
and Separate be buried in oblivion, and that we 
should be henceforth known to the world by the 
name of the United Baptist. 

The next Association in Carolina, is appointed 
to be at Whitfield's meeting house, in Pitt county, 
the second Saturday in October, 1789. 

May, 1789, the Association , met at the Isle (jf- 



78 HISTORY of the KEHUK&E' 

Wight meeting house, in Virginia. A church on 
IMeherrin, Southampton county, under the care of 
Elder Murrell, was received into the Association. 

Elder Isaac Backus, of New England, and El- 
ders John Pollard, Thomas Read and Thomas 
Armistead, being present, were invited to a seat in 
the Association. 

Query 1. Is it the duty of a minister to take little' 
children in his arms ( at the request of their parents 
or others ) and name them, and pray to the Lord to 
bless them? 

Aus. We think it duty for ministers to pray for 
infants as well as others, but not to take them in 
their arms and name them at that time. 

2. Is it orderly for a minister to withdraw from 
a church he ts pastor of and refuse to preach, or ad- 
minister the ordinances amongst them, because they 
do not pay him? 

Ans. By the law of Christ ministers are required 
to watch for souls as they that must give an ac- 
count, and their hearers are required to communi- 
cate unto them in all good things. Heb. xiii 7. 
Gal vi. 6. We believe that no minister can justly 
refuse to feed the flock he had taken the charge of, 
without either having their consent therefore, or 
else referring the case to the judgment of impar- 
tial brethren. 

Whereas our sister church at Pungo, Princess 
Anne county, Virginia, has not associated with us 
for a considerable time. It is advised that the min- 
utes of this Association, together with a letter of 
admonition (which Elder Barrow is requested to 
prepare) be sent to that church. 

The next Association in Virginia, to be holden 
at Reedy Creek, in Brunswick county, the Satur* 
day before the third Sunday in May, 1790. 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 19 

On the 10th of October, 1789, the Association 
convened at Whitfield's meeting-house, in Pitt 
county, North Carolina, brother Eiisha Battle was 
chosen Moderator, and Elder Burkitt Clerk. 

A church at Lockwood's Folly, in Brunswick 
county, and a church in Robeson county, North 
Carolina, under the care of Elder Jacob Tarver, 
joined the Association. 

On motion, Elders Burldtt, Barrow, Read, Ross 
and Moore were appointed a committee to prepare 
a plan or constitution for the future government of 
the Association. 

Elder Burkitt from the committee appointed by 
a resolution of the last October Association, to pro- 
pose measures for a reconciliation in the church at 
Kehukee, reported, that the committee attended ac- 
cording to appointment, and thought it best to ad- 
vise that church to relate their experiences to each 
other, and come under re-examination, in order to 
regain a general fellowship; which was unanimous- 
ly agreed to by the church, and accordingly put in 
practice. The Association concurred with the re- 
port. 

Elders Burkitt, Barrow, and Read were appoin- 
ted to preach on Sunday. 

A church in Bladen and New Hanover counties, 
under the care of Elder William Cooper, were re- 
ceived into union with us. 

The Junction of the Association. 
Whereas a division heretofore subsisted between 
the churches in the Association, called the Kehukee 
Association, those bars being taken down by the 
churches themselves, and approved by the Associa- 
tion; and as it is the desire of the churches and this 
Association that we again become one body as for- 



ao HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

merly, it was agreed that the following churches 
should be considered as part of our body, vi^: 

1. The church in Warren county, under the care 
of Elder Lewis Moore. 

2. The church in Franklin county, under the 
care of Elder William Lancaster. 

3. The church on Tosniot, under the care of 
Reubin Hayes. 

4. The church in Johnston and Wake counties, 
under the care of John Moore. 

5. The church in Duplin, Wayne and Johnston, 
under the care of Charles Hines. 

6. The church in Sampson, Wake and Cumber- 
land, under the care of W. Taylor. 

7. The church in Sampson county, under the 
care of Fleet Cooper. 

Elder Burkitt, from the committee appointed to 
prepare a Plan or Constitution for the future Gov- 
ernment of the Association, reported, that they had 
prepared a plan, which to them was thought the 
most adviseable; which was read, and debated ar-> 
tide by article, and amendments being made there- 
to, the Association resolved to adopt the following 
Plan or Constitution for the future Government 
of the Association, viz. 

The PLAN or CONSTITUTION of the UNI- 
TED BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, former, 

ly called the Kehukee Association 

p ,. TTtROM a long series of experience, we the 

rreamoie. jp churches of j esus Christ, being regularly 
baptized upon the profession of our faith in Christ, are 
convinced of the necessity of a combination of churches, 
in order to perpetuate an union and communion amongst 
us, and preserve and maintain a correspondence with 
each other in our union: We therefore propose to main- 
tain and keep the orders and rules of an Association, 
according to the following plan or form of government. 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. Si 

Article I. The Association shall be composed ofmem-* 
bers chosen by the different churches in our union, and 
duly sent to, represent them in the Association; who 
shall be members whom they judge best qualified for 
that purpose, and producing letters from their respec- 
tive churches, certifying their appointment, shall be en- 
titled to a seat. 

II. In the letters trom the different churches, shall 
be expressed their number in full fellowship, those bap- 
tized, received by letter, dismissed, excommunicated, 
and dead since the last Association. 

III. The members thus chosen and convened, shall 
be denominated the United Baptist Association^ former- 
ly called the Kehukee Association; being composed of 
sundry churches lying and being in North Carolina and 
the lower parts of Virginia: Who shall have no power 
to lord it over God's heritage; nor shall they have any 
classical power over the churches; nor shall they in- 
fringe any of the internal rights of any church in the 
union. 

IV. The Association, when convened, shall be gov- 
erned and ruled by a regular and proper decorum. 

V. The Association shall have a Moderator and 
Clerk, who shal be chosen by the suffrage of the mem- 
bers present, 

VI. New churches may be admitted into this union, 
who shall petition by letter and delegates, and upon 
examination (if found orthodox and orderly) shall be 
received by the Association, and manifested by the 
Moderator giving the delegates the right hand of fel- 
low ship, 

VII. Every church in the union shall be entitled to 
representation in the Association; but shall have only 
two members from each church. 

VIII. Every query presented by any member in the 
Association, shall be once read; and before it be debated 
the Moderator shall put it to vote, and if there be a ma- 
jority for its being debated, it shall be taken into con- 
sideration, and be deliberated; but if there be a majori- 
ty against it, it shall be withdrawn. 

IX. Every motion made and seconded, shall come 
under the consideration of the Association, except it be 
withdrawn by the member who made it. 

X. The Assoc ratio.) shall endeavour to furnish the 
churches with the minutes of the Associations. The 

: 6 



€2 HISTORY of the KEHTJKEE 

best method for effecting that purpose, shall be at tifct: 
discretion of the future Associations. 

XI. We think it absolutely necessary that we should 
have an Association Fund for defraying the expences of 
the same; For the raising and supporting of which, we 
think it the duty of each church in the union, to con- 
tribute voluntarily, such sums as they shall think prop- 
er, and send by the hands of their delegates, to the As- 
sociation; and those monies thus contributed by the 
churches, and received by the Association, shall be de- 
posited in the hands of a Treasurer, by the Association 
appointed, who shall be accountable to the Association 
for all monies by him received and paid out, according 
to the direction of the Association. 

XII. There shall be an Association book kept, where- 
in the proceedings of every Association shall be regularly 
recorded, by a Secretary appointed by the Association, 
who shall receive a compensation yearly, for his trouble. 

XIII. The minutes of the Association shall be read 
(and corrected if need be) and assigned by the Modera- 
tor andClerk before the Association rises. 

XIV. Amendments to this plan or form of govern- 
ment may be made at any time by a majority of the uni- 
on, when they may deem it necessary. 

XV. The Association shall have power— 

1. To provide for the general union of the churches. 

2. To preserve inviolably a chain of communion a- 
mongst the churches. 

5. To give the churches all necessary advice in mat- 
ters of difficulty. 

4. To.enquire into the cause why the churches fail to 
represent themselves at any time in the Association. 

5. To appropriate those monies by the churches con- 
tributed for an Association Fund, to any purpose they 
may think proper. 

6. To appoint any member or members, by and with 
his or their consent, to transact any business which they 
may see necessary. 

7. The Association shall have power to withdraw 
from any church in this union, which shall violate the 
rules of this Association, or deviate from the orthodox 
principles of religion. 

8. Co admit any of the distant brethren in the minis- 
try, as assistants, who may be present at the time of 
their sitting, whom they shall judge necessary. 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. S3 

9. The Association shall have power to adjourn them- 
selves to any future time or place they may think most 
convenient to the churches; provided it be holden once 
in the year in the State of Virginia^ and once in the year 
ifi North Carolina^ and the Association in North Caro- 
lina, interchangeably one year on the north side of Tar 
JRiver 9 and the next year on tire south side of Tar Riv- 
er: And the members living within each district, to fix 
the time and place for holding the Association within 
said district. 

The minutes of the Association had never before 
this time been printed. It was at this Association 
ordered that 250copies of the minutes of this Asso- 
ciation should be printed; and thai the Constitu- 
tion or Form of Government, and an abstract of 
our principles, be inserted in the same; which was 
done accordingly. There were now 51 churches, 
and 3944 members in the Association. So that 
through the goodness of God we had increased 4U 
churches, and 1354 members in twelve years, and 
we have great reason to be thankful to Almighty 
God that an happy union had taken place between 
all the churches of Regulars and Separates. 

The next Association was holden at Reedy 
Creek meeting house, in Brunswick county, Virgi- 
nia, May, 1790. Elder Meglamre Moderator, El- 
der Burkitt Clerk. 

At this Association, a church in Portsmouth, and 
one in Mecklenberg, Virginia, under the care of El- 
der John King, were received into the Association. 

At this Association the business of dividing the 
Association was under consideration, but it was 
judged not expedient to divide at this time. 

Elder Burkitt was appointed to write a Circular 
Letter for the next Association, on the doctrine of 
sanctification. 

It was also resolved, that it be recommended to 
the churches in our connection, to give their unox-^ 



84 HISTORY op the XEHUKEE 

dained preachers, who travel amongst the churches* 
a suitable recommendation. 

The next Association was appointed at Davis's 
meeting house, in Halifax county, North Carolina, 
on the Saturday before the second Sunday in 06- 
tober, 1790, 

October, 1790, the Association met at Davis's 
meeting house, according to appointment. Elder 
Barrow preached the introductory sermon from 
Luke, xii. 15: Take heed and beware of covetous- 
ness. Brother Elisha Battle Moderator, Elder 
Burkitt Clerk. Letters from 54 churches were read. 

A church on Flatty Creek, Pasquotank county; 
a church near Wiccacon, in Bertie" county; a church 
on Sawyer's creek, Camden county; a church on 
Trent, Jones county; a church on Hadnott's Creek, 
Carteret county, and a church in Dobbs county, 
North Carolina, were received into membership in 
this Association. 

A committee of five, viz: Elders Barrow, Bur- 
kitt; and Brethren Battle, Lemmon, and Col. Bry- 
an, were appointed to devise ways and means for 
the encouragement of itinerant preaching. Who 
reported, that whereas it does appear to us, from a 
variety of circumstances, that itinerant preaching is 
necessary, and we hope would be a blessing, we 
therefore advise the Association to recommend to 
the several churches in the union, to signify in their 
letters to the next Association, whether they ap- 
prove of the following plan, viz: 1. That the Asso- 
ciation be divided into certain districts. 2. That a 
Certain number of ministers be appointed by the 
Association to travel, attend at, and preach to each 
church once at least in six months or more often. 
3, That such ministers as are nominated shall have 
no power or superiority over the churches by vir^ 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 85 

tue of their delegation or otherwise, more than to 
advise. 4. We would advise every church when 
visited to call those ministers to their assistance in 
eonference, about any matter of difficulty, whether 
it be in principle or practice. 5. That the Associ- 
ation do recommend the respective churches of 
their connection, to consider what the Apostle says 
concerning this matter, "That they who preach 
the gospel should live of the gospel;" and accord- 
ingly advise the churches to consider the expences 
of those ministers, and use proper means in each 
church (which they themselves may prescribe) to 
answer that purpose, and voluntarily contribute to 
them for the defraying of such expences. 

Elders Burkrtt,. Ross and Barnes, were appoint- 
ed to attend the church at Flat Swamp, who were 
under difficulties respecting the doctrine of Univer- 
sal Restoration, strenuously propagated amongst 
them by a certain John Stan-sill, and propose mea- 
sures for their relief. 

At this Association, it was again solicited for a 
division of the Association,, and after along delibe- 
ration on the subject it was resolved, that the Asso- 
ciation be divided into two distinct Associations,, 
and that the State line between Virginia and North 
Carolina, be the dividing line between the two As- 
sociations, and that they should constantly visit 
each other by two delegates and abetter of corres- 
pondence. 

Remarks on the Division, 

The division of the Association was not occasion- 
ed by any discordant principles, nor any difference 
of judgment with respect to church government, 
»or want of love; but purely for conveniency. The 
Association had become very numerous, and the 
churches lay at a great distance from each other 
8* 



m HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

The Association now consisted of 61 churches,, 
which contained 5017 members, and many of the 
cr nrehes being at a great distance from the center 
ot the Association, it was thought best to divide in- 
to two bodies. For the convenience of the chur- 
ches, 1. There were appointed four general Con* 
ferenees in different parts of the Association, which, 
were authorised with power to transact business 
similar to the Association, and their proceedings 
transmitted to the annual Association: then it was 
thought best to have only two occasional Associa- 
tions, and their minutes returned to the annual As- 
sociation. Some of the churches repeatedly re- 
questing a division, and as many of the churches 
Jay in Virginia, the Association agreed to hold two 
Associations annually; one in Virginia, the other in 
Carolina; the Association in Virginia in the spring, 
the Association in Carolina in the fall. This con- 
tinued until the Association at Davis's meeting 
house in 1790, when according to a resolution of 
the last Association the subject of a division was 
again taken up, and they agreed t# divide, and the 
State line between Virginia and North Carolina was 
to be the dividing line between the two Associa- 
tions. The Association in North Carolina then 
consisted of 42 churches, and still retained the name 
of the Kehukee Association. The Association in 
Virginia first assembled at Portsmouth, and called 
themselves by the name of the Virginia Portsmouth 
Association. They consisted of 19 churches at 
their first meeting. 

Biographical sketches of Elders Samuel Ha** 
fell and Henry Abbot. 

Elder SAMUEL HARBELL. 

Elder Samuel Harrell was born the 25th Bs- 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. tp 

cember, 1756, in Hertford county, N, C. He em- 
braced religion in his youth, and joined the church 
near Wiccacon, now under the care of Elder Hen- 
dry. He began to preach in a few years after he 
became a member, and was much approved of by 
all who heard him. He was a man of a bright ge- 
nius, masculine voice, a ready mind, and a good 
orator. He appeared to be a man of eminent pie- 
ty, and a zealous preacher of' the gospel, notwith- 
standing his worldly embarrassments. He was 
Major of the militia in Hertford county, Clerk of 
the court of said county, and employed in the mer- 
cantile line, in the time he exercised his public min- 
istry; yet we never found he neglected the worship 
of God in his family, or omitted attending at his 
own church Conferences, or public worship when 
convenient. He was elected a member of the Con- 
vention in 1788, for the deliberation of the Federal 
Constitution. He continued preaching a few years, 
but was never ordained. He departed this life in 
January, 1791, aged 35 years. 

Elder HENRY ABBOT. 
Elder Henry Abbot was the son of the Rev. 
John Abbot, Canon of St. Paul's, London. He 
left England while young, without the consent or 
knowledge of his parents, and came over to Ameri- 
ca. He had a tolerable education and was chiefly 
employed in keeping school until converted and 
called to the ministry. He was baptized by a min- 
ister o( ihe free will order before he was converted, 
as he afterwards acknowledged. But it pleased 
God to reveal his dear Son to his soul, the hope of 
glory, and also to convince him of the doctrines of 
free and sovereign grace, and he joined the Regu- 
lar Baptists, and became a preacher of that society."- 



83 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

He acted as an itinerant preacher for a few years* 
and about the year of 1764 or 1765, he took the 
care of the church in Camden county, N. C. which 
was formerly under the care of Elder John Burges, 
a worthy character. He continued preaching and 
baptizing here until the revolution took place at the 
Falls of Tar River, mentioned in page 37. After 
this, being dissatisfied with his former baptism in 
unbelief, he was baptized upon a confession of his 
faith in Christ Jesus, and still continued his pasto- 
ral functions in that church, and his labours were 
blest. He was a man of a strong mind, very or- 
thodox, well acquainted with church discipline, and 
of a distinguished character. He was much es- 
teemed by men of character in the county where he 
resided, and very useful as a statesman. He was 
chosen several times a member of the State Con- 
ventions. He was a member of the Provincial 
Congress when the State Constitution was formed 
and adopted; and to him we owe our thanks, in a 
measure, for the security of some of our religious 
rights. He was also a member of the Convention, 
for the deliberation of the Federal Constitution, and 
at the time of his election had a greater number of 
votes than any man in the county. After he had 
for many years been useful, it was the will of his 
Lord and master to call him away to receive the 
crown of righteousness he had laid up for him. 
Towards the latter end of his life, he said he did not 
delight much in reading controversies, but experi- 
mental divinity met his approbation. He was fre- 
quently reading, and seemed much delighted in a 
book, titled " Pious Memorials ," which contained 
the life and death of many eminent saints. At last, 
after a violent affliction of a few days, he cheerful- 
ly resigned his immortal sou! into the bands of a 



% 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. fc9 

dear and ever blessed saviour. He departed this 
life, May, 1791. He requested a long time before 
he died, that if Elder Burkitt survived him, that he 
should preach his funeral sermon; which he did to 
a crowded and much affected audience, from 2 
Tim. iv. 7, 8: I have fought a good fight, I have 
Jidished my course^ I have kept thefaith,&c. 



CHAP. V. 

i. Proceedings of the Association until the Division 
took place between the Kehukee and JVeuse Associ- 
ations, concluded on at the Association, hold en at 
Skewarkey,in October, 1793. Proceedings conti- 
nued until 1 796. 2. Biographical Sketches of El- 
ders John Page, Jonathan Barnes, and Brother 
Joshua Freeman. 3. A few remarks on Itinerant 
Preaching. 4. The Association Fund. 

October, 1791, the Association convened at 
Flat Swamp meeting house, in Pitt county, North 
Carolina. This was the first Association after the 
division. Delegates from thirty-seven churches 
were present. 

The introductory sermon was preached by El- 
der Burkitt, from Rev. xii. 3,4. Col. Nathan 
Mayo was chosen Moderator, and Elder Burkitt 
Clerk. Elders Barrow and Browne were Messen- 
gers from the Virginia Portsmouth Association. 

A church on Moratiuck Creek, in Tyrrel county, 
a church at Maitamuskeet, a church on Little Con- 
tentney, and a church on Bear March, in Duplin 
county, North Carolina, on petition, were received 
mto the Association,. 



SO HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

As there was a plan proposed by the last Associ- 
ation for the encouragement of itinerant preaching, 
and recommended to the churches for their appro- 
bation or disapprobation; it appeared by the letters 
to this Association, that there are a great majority 
of churches against the adoption of the proposed 
plan. This Association thought proper to certify 
to the churches that they still thought itinerant 
preaching useful, therefore advised the churches t& 
fall on some measures to encourage it. 

It was also, at this tinre, resolved to recommend 
it to the churches, to signify in their letters to the 
next Association, whether they would approve of an 
alteration of the last section of the last article of the 
Constitution, or not, the words are, "The Associa- 
tion shall have power to adjourn themselves to any 
time or place they may think most convenient to the 
churches, provided it be interchangeably holden 
one year on the north side of Tar River,, and the 
next year on the south side of Tar River." 

Elder Ross and Elder Baker were appointed our 
Delegates to the next Virginia Portsmouth Jlssoci- 
ation* Elder Read was appointed to write a circu- 
lar letter for our nest, on the doctrine of original 
sin. 

The next Association was appointed at Elder 
Baker's meeting house, on Bear Creek, then 
Dobbs, but now Lenoir county, the Saturday be- 
fore the 2d Sunday in October, 1792. 

October. 1792, the Association convened at 
Bear Creek. The introductory sermon was prea- 
ched by Elder Ross. The circular letter prepar- 
ed by Elder Read was received, aad ordered to be 
printed. The Association after some time sitting, 
adjourned to their next annual appointment; which 
was appointed at Skewarkey meeting house, in 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 91 

Martin county, the Saturday before the 2d Sunday 
in October, 1793. 

At which time and place the Association met, 
-and an introductory sermon was delivered by Eider 
Thomas Etheridge, from John iii. 16. Col. Na- 
than Bryan was chosen Moderator, and Elder Bur- 
kin Clerk. Letters from forty-three churches 
were read in this Association. Elder Murrell was 
a Delegate from the Portsmouth Association. A 
letter from Georgia Association was received and 
read. A church in Franklin county, at the Pop- 
lar Spring; a church at the Maple Spring, in said 
county; and a church on Durham's Creek, in Beau- 
fort county, on petition, were received into this As- 
sociation. 

The Association had now increased, and som# 
.-of the churches were very desirous for another di- 
vision to take place. The Kehukee Association 
now consisted of 49 churches, which contained 
3440 members, according to the returns made to 
tljis Association. It was therefore thought neces- 
sary to divide a second time; accordingly it was re- 
solved, that Tar-River be the dividing line be- 
tween the Associations; and the Association between 
Tar River and Virginia line, still retained the name 
of the Kehukee Association; and the other, south of 
Tar River, was called the JVeuse Association. 

It was also agreed that each Association should 
annually visit the other with two Delegates, and a 
letter of correspondence. 

Our Delegates to the Association south of Ta» 
River, were Elders Jesse Read and Lewie 
Moore. 

Our next Association was appointed at Sandy 
Run, in Bertie, North Carolina, Elder M'Cabe to 
preach the introductory sermon, Elder Lancaster 



92 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

to write the circular letter, on the saints final perse- 
verance in grace. 

On the 27th of September, 1794, the Associa- 
tion according to her respective appointment, met 
at Sanely Run. The introductory sermon was de- 
livered by Elder M'Cabe, according to appoint- 
ment, from John xv. 14: Ye are my friends, if ye 
do whatsoever I command you. After prayer by 
Elder Burkitt, Colonel Mayo was chosen Modera- 
te^ and Elder Burkitt Clerk. 

This was the first meeting after the second divis- 
ion took place, and we were reduced to only 26 
churches. Letters from only 22 were received and 
read in this Association. Brethren Wall, Murrell, 
and Barnes, ministers fram our sister Associations, 
being present, were invited to seats with as. JC1- 
ders Lancaster, Ross and Murrell were appointed 
to preach on Sunday. A church on Meherrin. 
formerly under the care of Elder William Parker 
(a General Baptist) petitioned by letter and Dele- 
gate for admission into this Association. On ex- 
amination, it appears there has been a revolution 
in this church, and believing them now to be of our 
faith and order, they were received. 

Our next Association is appointed at Yoppim 
meeting house, in Chowan county, the Saturday 
before the fourth Sunday in September, 1795, 
Elder Read was appointed to preach the introduc- 
tory sermon, and Elder Burkitt was appointed to 
write the circular letter, on effectual calling. 
mk At this Association it was resolved, that the Sat- 
urday before the fourth Sunday in every month, 
should be appointed a day for prayer meetings 
throughout the churches; whereon all the members 
of the respective churches are requested to meet at 
their meeting houses, or places of worship, ami 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 9^ 

there, for each of them, as far as time will admit, to 
make earnest prayer to God for a revival of reli- 
gion amongst us. 

September, 1795, the Association met at Yop^ 
pirn. The introductory sermon was preached by 
"Elder Read, from 1 Pet. v. 2, 3: Feed the flock 
GfGod, whichis among you, taking th& over-sight 
thereof, not by constraint, but willingly; not for filthy 
lucre, but of a ready mind: JVeither as being lords 
overGod^s heritage, but being ensamples to the flock. 

Col. Nathan Mayo Moderator, Elder Burkitt 
Clerk. Elder Barrow was messenger from the Vir- 
ginia Portsmouth Association. A letter of corres- 
pondence from the Neuse Association was received, 
but the delegates failed attending. A letter of cor- 
respondence from the Georgia Association was re- 
ceived and read. 

Elders Barrow, Burkitt and Spivey were appoin- 
ted a committee to devise ways and means to en- 
courage the brethren in the ministry to visit the 
churches. Who, after mature deliberation on the 
subject, reported, that it was their opinion that this 
Association should appoint four ministers who are 
ordained, to travel and preach at every meeting 
house or meeting place in this whole connection, 
that can be made convenient this year, viz: The 
first in the nomination (if to him convenient, if not 
to substitute one of the other three in his stead) to 
begin at Kehukee on Sunday the 15th of Novem- 
ber, and to continue till he has gone through all the 
churches; and that the appointments be sent for* 
ward from this place. And that day three months, 
the second in nomination to follow him, beginning 
at the same place; the first notifying the people of 
the second coming on, and the second the third, he. 

The committee also added, that they did not in* 
9 



94 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

tend by the plan they proposed, to discourage any 
other brethren in the ministry who are not in the 
nomination, from travelling and preaching to the 
churches as much as they think the Lord calls 
them to. 

The Association concurred with the report; and 
by ballot of the Association, Elders Burkitt, Ethe- 
ridge, John M'Cabe and Spivey were chosen. 

The next Association to be holden at Parker's 
meeting house, in Hertford county, September, the 
fourth Sunday, 1795. Elder Lancaster appointed 
to preach the introductory sermon. Elder M'Cabe 
to write the circular letter. 

Saturday, 24th September, 1796, the Associa- 
tion met pursuant to the appointment, at Parker's 
meeting house, on Meherrin. Elder Lancaster 
preached the introductory sermon from Songs, iv. 
12: A garden inclosed, is my sister, my spouse; a 
spring shut up, a fountain sealed. 

Elder M'Cabe chosen Moderator, Elder Burkiti 
Clerk. Letters from 22 churches were received 
and read. Elders Browne and Morris were Cor- 
responding Delegates from the Virginia Portsmouth 
Association* Elders Totewine and Tison were De- 
legates from the Neuse Association. Elders Mur- 
rell, Barnes, Wall and M'Clenny, from our sister 
Associations, being present, were invited to seats 
with us. 

A church on Great Swamp, in Pitt county, un- 
der the pastoral care of Elder Noah Tison, was re- 
ceived into membership with this Association. 

This Association did not think proper to continue 
the mode adopted by the last, for the encourage- 
ment of itinerant preaching. 

Query. Is it agreeable tn the word of God to hold 
a inan infellowshipt that has married a woman who 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 95 

has another husband living in the same county; or 
hold her in communion? 

Ans. We humbly conceive that such a practice 
is diametrically opposite to the word of God, and 
therefore give it as our opinion, that such members 
ought not to be held in communion.. 

The next Association appointed at Flatty Cretek a 
hi Pasquotank county, N. C. on the Thursday be- 
fore the fourth Sunday in September, 1797. EU 
der Spivey to preach the introductory sermon, and 
Elder Gilbert to write the circular letter, on regen* 
tralion. 

Biographical Sketches. 

Brother Joshua Freeman was the son of Will- 
iam Freeman, of Chowan county, N. C. His par- 
ents were both strict Episcopalians. He was con- 
verted under the ministry of Elder Dargan, about 
the year of 1777, and was received and baptised ?fr 
member of his church near Wiccacon, now under 
the care of Elder Hendry. He was one of the Dea- 
cons of that church. He was so remarkably zeal- 
ous, and tender under preaching, that he hardly ev- 
er heard a sermon zealously delivered, but what he 
would break out in raptures, praising and glorify- 
ing God. He very frequently attended our Associ- 1 
ations, and he was so loving that he gained the ge- 
neral esteem of all the brethren with whom lie was 
acquainted, and we felt happy when he was pre- 
sent, and when he was absent something seemed 
wanting. He was a man of considerable fortune, 
and some years past was Captain of a company of 
militia in Bertie; but had long since resigned that 
office, for it was evident that he soaght not ihe hon- 
or that comes from man, but that which comes 
from God only. Although he had many slaves, 
his lenity towards them was very remarkable. If 



36 HISTORY or the K'EHUKEE 

any of them transgressed, his general method ta 
chastise them was to expose their faults before the 
jrest of his servants and the whole family, when 
they came in to family worship in the morning 1 : 
who, when assembled at morning prayer, would 
talk to them, exhort and rebuke them so sharply 
for their faults, that made others fear. Elder Bur- 
Jutt bad often been at his house the time of public 
prayer, and he was so very much affected for the 
spiritual welfare of his family, that often he seemed 
almost convulsed. And this extraordinary zeal 
was not the impulse of a moment, but his constant 
practice for seventeen years, and continued to his 
dying moment, and instead of declining rather in- 
creased. On Saturday night before he died he 
went to prayer with his family, and was immedi- 
ately seized with a paralytic fit (for he had been 
under that complaint for about twelve months) the 
operation of which continued till Monday evening, 
the 10th of November, 1794, when he died. And 
we hope he is now where his longing soul is satis- 
fied with beholding his Saviour's face without a 
glass between* His death was sincerely lamented 
by all his friends and acquaintance; and every per- 
son who was acquainted with his merit, on hearing 
the melancholy news ef his deatl^ can but drop a 
tear. His funeral sermon was pleached by Elder 
Burkitt, from Phil. i. 21: For to me to live is Christy 
and to die is gain* 

Elder JOHN PAGE. 
Elder John Page embraced religion under the 
preaching of Elder Jonathan Thomas, and became 
a member of a branch of his church at Connetoe. 
At what time he was called to the ministry we are 
not abje to say; but exercising his gift for a while; 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 9f" 

he was at length ordained Pastor of the church at 
Flat Swamp, which was dismissed from Tosniot, 
and became a constituted body. He continued 
preaching for several years, and his labors were 
blessed. And although his church at times, was 
greatly distressed on account of a division amongst 
them, by reason oiAnnenianism and Universalis™, 
yet Elder Page appeared always steadfast in the 
Calvinistic doctrines. After finishing the work 
which his Heavenly Father designed for him to do^ 
lie departed this life October, 1796. 

Elder JONATHAN BARNES. 

Elder Jonathan Barnes was a resident of Cur- 
rituck county, North Carolina; and was a member 
of the church at Cowenjock, in said county. He 
was born blind; and it is-very. certain-- that he never?* 
saw any thing with his natural eyes. He was con- 
verted in -his youth,, and was baptized; and began 
to preach while young. His mother and others 
were frequently reading to him, and he was remark* 
able for a retentive memory* There were not ma- 
ny passages of scripture, but what he would tell the 
book, chapter and verse where they were, if appli- 
ed to. And in preaching he would prove his doc- 
trine, by citing texts of scripture, and telling the 
place where they were, far exceeding any other 
minister we ever heard. It was said he could re- 
peat about two hundred of Watt's hymns, and there 
were none in the book but he knew some verses of 
them. He had such a faculty in knowing the voi- 
ces of people, that if he heard a person of his ac- 
quaintance talk in conversation with him half an 
hour, and was not to hear him speak again in five 
years, he would know him again on hearing him 
t$]JL He married a .wife, in .Currituck, but we do 
• 9* 



9S HIST0RY of the KEHUKEE 

not know whether he had any children. He traw 
elled considerably, but always had a guide when he 
did so. He was much approved by the people, and 
many were amazed at his gifts and memory. He 
moved out to Whitfield's meeting house, on Little 
Contentney, where he lived awhile, then removed 
back to Currituck, where he died; which was in the 
year 1796. 

Itinerant Preaching. 

For a great many years, it was thought that 
itinerant preaching was calculated to prove a 
blessing to the churches; therefore sundry attempts 
were made by the Association to bring about the 
desirable effect. A plan was first laid in the 
church at South Quay in 1786. A committee was 
appointed to investigate it, but did not agree on it. 
The next Association another plan was adopted, 
but did not prove successful. Some of the church- 
es and ministers still kept soliciting for ways and 
means to be devised for its encouragement, until 
the Association at Davis's meeting house, where a 
certain plan was devised by three laymen and two 
preachers, in committee, and approbated by that 
Association, was sent to the churches, to know whe- 
ther they would approve or disapprove of said plan. 
Accordingly a majority oft|ie churches in their let- 
ters to the next Association, disapproved of it, and 
all the attempts for the encouragement of itiner- 
ant preaching proved ineffectual, until the Associ- 
ation at Yoppim in 1796. Then a new plan wa,s 
laid and put into execution at the time ap- 
pointed. But we believe only two of the four 
ministers who were appointed, travelled through 
all the churches, viz: Elder Burkitt and Elder M'- 
Cabe, We still believe*, that if ministers were to 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION: 9£ 

travel and preach more, that it would prove a bles-, 
sing to the churches. 

•Association Fund. 
It became necessary that there should be an Ask 
sociation fund, to defray the expences thereof; but^ 
no regular plan was laid for to bring it to pass, un- 
til the Association at Whitfield's meeting house, in 
1789. When the minutes were first printed 3 and 
the Constitution formed, it was an article in the 
Constitution, and Elder Burkitt appointed Treasu- 
rer. The fund was chiefly intended to defray the 
expences of printing the minutes, and other char- 
ges arising therefrom, and may lawfully be applied 
to any other use the Association may deem neces- 
sary. The mode of contributing is for every 
church to send what they please, and the sum by 
them contributed to be inserted in the minutes; and 
a regular statement of the money contributed from 
all the churches, and the expences of the Associa- 
tion, to be printed yearly, so that all may know the 
state of the fund. 



CHAP. VI. 

P. Proceedings of the Association until 1802. 2, 
Biographical Sketches of Elder John Meglamre, 
and Brother Elisha Battle, who departed this 
life in 1799. 

The Association met at Flatty Creek, Pasquo* 
tank county, N. C. on Thursday, 21st September, 
1797. Elder Spivey preached the introductory 
sermon, from Psal, tfxxxiii. 1: Behold how good 



100 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together* 
in unity. Elder M'Cabe Moderator, Elder Spivey 
Clerk. Letters from 19 churches were read. Elder 
Morris, Corresponding Delegate from the Virginia 
Portsmouth Association, took his seat, and present- 
ed to the Association a letter of correspondence and 
27 copies of their minutes. Elders William Soary 
and James M'CIenny, ministering brethren from 
our sister Portsmouth Association, being present, 
were invited to seats in this Association. Elder 
M'Cabe was appointed a Delegate to next Neuse 
Association: Elder Ross to the Virginia Ports- 
mouth. The next Association to be at Cashie, in 
Bertie county, N. C. September, 1798. 

September 20th, 1798, the Association convened 
according to appointment, at Cashie, in Bertie 
county. The introductory sermon by Elder Da- 
vis Biggs, from 1 Pet. iii. 12: For the eyes of the 
Lord are over the righteous^ and his ears are open 
to their prayers; but the face of the Lord is against 
them that do evil. Prayer by Elder Ross. Col. 
Mayo was chosen Moderator, Elder Burkitt Clerk. 
Letters from 23 churches were read. Received 
letters from the following corresponding Associa^ 
tions, viz: Virginia Portsmouth, with her minutes; 
Elder Browne and Jacob Gregg Messengers. 
Neuse, with their minutes; Joshua Barnes Messen- 
ger: and Georgia, with minutes. We also received 
minutes from Philadelphia, New York, Charleston,. 
Danbury, Middle District, Stonington, Delaware^ 
Woodstock, Ketockton, Warren, Roanoke, Goshen, 
Dover, Shaftsbury and Hepzibah Associations. 

A church in Franklin county (Haywood's meet- 
ing house) was received into this Association. 

Query. What shall a church do, when one member 
brings an accusation against another member, and' 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. lOi 

-he denies the charge — shall the testimony of the ac- 
cuser, unsupported by any other evidence , be received 
by the church or not? Ans, No. 

At this Association it was resolved to have a& 
many copies of the minutes printed as would a- 
mount to £18, and for to sell the minutes to defray 
the expences. But on experience it was found in- 
effectual. It was the first time that an attempt of 
this kind was made, and it has been the last. 
This Association also thought proper to discontinue 
the practice of paying the corresponding Delegates 
from us to our sister Associations. 

The next Association appointed at the new meet-' 
ing house on Fishing Creek. Elder Amariah 
Biggs to preach the introductory sermon, and El- 
der Spivey to write the circular letter. 

Saturday, the 5th of October, 1799, the Associ- 
ation met at Fishing Creek. Brother Amariah 
Biggs preached the introductory sermon, from 
Heb. xiii. 1: Let brotherly love continue. Prayer 
by Brother Davis Biggs. Col. Mayo Moderator, 
Elder Burkitt Clerk. Letters from 22 churches 
were read. Elders Jesse Mercer from Georgia, 
Elder Barnes from the Neuse Association, and El- 
der Brame from Virginia, were invited to sit with 
us. A newly constituted church at Quankey, in 
Halifax county, was received into this Association. 
Letters of correspondence from Virginia Ports- 
mouth, Georgia and Hepzibah Associations were 
received aqd read. 

As several of the churches in their letters to this 
Association, complain of their destitute state with 
respect to ministerial helps, and some others have 
earnestly requested the ministers to visit them, on 
motion by Elder Burkitt, it was resolved that El- 
ders Mercer, Lancaster, Read, Gilbert and Burkitt 



102 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

be a committee to devise ways and means for the 
encouragement of itinerant preaching* The com- 
mittee sitting, and taking the matter into consider- 
ation, reported, that — Whereas sundry of the 
churches in our Association are deprived of minis- 
terial helps to administer the ordinances to them, 
and several others have requested the brethren in 
the ministry to visit them, we, your committee, d^ 
advise this Association to make out their appoint- 
ments, and grant supplies to those destitute church- 
es, and visit them, at least at each of their quarterty 
meetings; and to visit as often as conveniency wilt 
admit, all other churches who have so particularly 
in their letters requested the ministers to visit them. 
The Association concurred with the report. The 
church who convene at Parker's meeting house, 
representing their destitute case with respect to 
ministerial helps to administer the ordinances t# 
them, the following brethren in the ministry did a- 
gree to attend them at their quarterly meetings the 
ensuing year, viz. Elder Harrell, the Saturday be- 
fore the first Sunday in November; Elder Burkitt, 
on the Saturday before the first Sunday in Februa- 
ry; Elder Lancaster, on the Saturday before the 
first Sunday in May; and Elder Read, the Satur- 
day before the first Sunday in August next. 

Querj'. Should a minister who has been regular- 
ly ordained as an itinerant preacher, he called upon 
to take the pastoral care of a particular church; is 
there any thing necessary to be done, more than the 
consent df each party? 

Ans. Nothing more is necessary. 

Minutes from the following Associations were re- 
ceived, viz: Shaftsbury r New Hampshire, Leyden, 
Woodstock, Danbury, Warren, Delaware, Culpep- 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION* 103 

per, Ketockton, Philadelphia and New York Asso- 
ciations. 

The next Association was appointed at the Falls 
of Tar River, the Saturday before the first Sunday 
in October, 1800. Elder Gilbert appointed Vtf 
write the circular letter; Elder Hendry appointed 
to preach the introductory sermon, and incase of 
failure Elder Joseph Biggs. 

Thursday, 2 1st of November, was appointed a 
day of general thanksgiving to Almighty God f 
throughout the churches, for this temporal bless- 
ings on our fields and farms, and that our country 
seems happily delivered from the fearful apprehen- 
sions of want and scarcity. 

The Association next convened at the Falls of 
Tar River, Nash county, pursuant to appoint- 
ment, on the Saturday before the first Sunday in 
October, 1800. 

Sermon by Joseph Biggs 5 from 1 Kings, vi. 8: 
The door for iht middle chamber was in the right 
side of the house: and they went up with winding 
stairs into the middle chamber, and out of the middle 
into the third. Col. Mayo Moderator, Elder Bur- 
kitt Clerk. Letters from 21 churches were read. 
Elder Lewis Moore from Tennessee being present, 
was invited to a seat. Letters of correspondence 
from Virginia Portsmouth and Neuse Associations 
were read; and their Messengers. Elders Murrell, 
Barnes and Oliver took their seats. Elders James 
M'Cabe and Gilbert were appointed Messengers to 
the Neuse Association; Elders Lancaster and Read 
to the Virginia Portsmouth. Elders Murrell, 
x Moore and Burkitt were appointed to preach on 
Sunday. 

Query. Is it not wrong for a man who is a mem" 
her of a church and the head of a family, wholly ic 



104 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

neglect family worship on account of the smallness 
of his gifts in prayer? Ans. It is wrong. 

Received seven copies of the minutes of the 
Charleston Association, as a token of their respectv 
One was read in the Association, 

Query 2. Ought not Deacons to be regularly or- 
dained before they use the office of a Deacon in any 
respect? Ans. Yes. 

The next Association was appointed at the Great 
Swamp meeting house, in Pitt county, October, 
1801. Elder Martin Ross to preach the introduc- 
tory sermon, Elder Etheridge to write the circular 
letter. 

October the 3d, 1801, the Association met ac* 
cording to appointment at Great Swamp, Pitt 
county, North Carolina. Introductory sermon by 
Elder Ross, from Rev. xvi. 15: Behold, 1 come as 
a thief Blessed is he that watcheth and keepeth his 
garments, lest he walk naked, and theyspe his shame, 
Col. Mayo Moderator, Elder Burkitt Clerk. Let- 
ters from 20 churches were read. Elder Brame 
being present, was invited to a seat. A letter from 
the Virginia Portsmouth Association was received 
from their Messengers, Elders Browne and Grigg. 
A letter of correspondence from the Neuse Associ- 
. ation was received* Elder Barnes was their dele- 
gate. Elder Burkitt appointed to write to the 
Portsmouth, Elder M'Cabe to the Neuse, and El- 
der Ross to the Georgia Association. The circu- 
lar letter which Elder Etheridge was appointed to 
write for this year, was presented to the Associa~ 
tion in an unfinished imperfect state; it was there- 
fore resolved that Elder Burkitt write such an one 
as he may think proper, which shall contain as ac- 
curate an account of the revivals of religion in the 
different States as have come within his knowledge^ 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 105 

and insert it in these minutes; which said letter shall 
be deemed the circular letter from this Association 
to the respective churches. Elders Brown, Burk- 
itt and Grigg were appointed to preach on Sun- 
day. The circular letter in the minutes of the Do- 
ver Assoc iatiOn was read, which informed us of a 
happy revival among them. Elders James M'Cabe 
and Tison were appointed Delegates to the Neuse 
Association. Elders Burkitt and Ross to the 
Portsmouth Association. 

Minutes from Flat River, Dover, Ketockton, 
Roanoke, Middle District and Goshen Associations 
were received. The next Association appointed at 
Elder Hendry's church near Wiccacon, October, 
1802. Elder Moses Bennett appointed to preach 
the introductory sermon, and in case of failure, 
Elder Lancaster. Elder Read appointed to write 
the circular letter. 

By the letters to this Association there were 138 
baptized last year; and it appeared by the success 
of the word preached at this time, and the general 
engagement of the ministers, and ihe great desire 
of the brethren, that a glorious revival was riot far 
distant; which shortly appeared, and the particu- 
lars of which our readers will be furnished with in 
the subsequent chapters. 

October 2, 1802, the Association met at Elder 
Hendry's meeting house, in Bertie, North Carolina. 
The ministers appointed by the last Association to 
deliver an introductory sermon to this, not being 
present, a sermon was preached by Elder Davis 
Biggs, from 2 Cor. v. 10: For we must all ap* 
pear before the judgment seat of Christ , that every 
on? may receive the things done in his body, accor- 
ding to what he hath done, whether it be good or bad. 
Col. Mayo Moderator, Elder Spivey Clerk* Elder 
10 



106 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

Jeremiah Ritter from Virginia, being present, was 
invited to a seat. Letters from 20 churches were 
read. 

Letters from Portsmouth and Neuse Associations 
were received and read; and their Messengers, El- 
ders Browne, Biggs, Whitfield and Cooper took 
their seats. Elder Gilbert appointed to write to 
the Portsmouth, Elder Spivey to the Neuse Associ- 
ation. It was agreed at this Association to reprint 
a sermon published by Elder Leland, of Massachu- 
setts, titled, a "Blow at the Root." Elders Browne, 
Whitfield and Ross were appointed to preach on 
Sunday. Elders James Ross and Holloway Mor- 
ris Messengers to the Neuse, Elders Read and 
Martin Ross Messengers to the Portsmouth Associ- 
ation. The next Association to be held at the 
Log Chapel, in Martin county, on Connoho Creek, 
on the Friday before the first Sunday in October, 
3 803, and continue four days. Elder Wall to 
preach the introductory sermon, Elder Ross to 
write the circular letter. As Elder Burkitt was 
absent from this Association by reason of sickness, 
it was resolved by the Association that the follow- 
ing minute should be made in the proceedings of the 
Association, viz: "Our very respectable and high- 
ly esteemed Brother Lemuel Burkitt, whose la- 
bors in the gospel have been much blessed in the 
churches belonging to this Association, especially 
in the late revival of religion, has manifested his 
sincere desire to be with us at this Association, by 
coming to this place through many difficulties; but 
sickness soon obliged him to leave us, which has 
grieved our hearts, and he has been greatly miss- 
ed But we must submit to the hand of the 
Lord 9 ' A glorious revival took place the past 
year according to expectation: and the letter^ 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. i 7 

from the churches say that 872 were added to the 
Churches by baptism since the last; and blessed be 
God the work was going on. The particulars of 
the revival we mean to speak of in time and place. 

% Biographical Sketches. 

Elder John Mkglamre was born and raised ia 
one of the northern States, and being somewhat re- 
ligiously inclined in his youth,' at length moved in- 
to North Carolina. He joined the Baptist Society 
about the year 1764 or 1765. After preaching 
sometime, he was ordained and took the pastoral 
care of the church at Kehukee. But having some 
invitations, he travelled into Sussex county, Vir- 
ginia, where he preached, and his labors were at- 
tended with a blessing. And through his instru- 
mentality, and Elder John Rivers, and some others* 
a church was gathered in that county; and through 
their solicitations be removed to that place, and 
gave up his pastoral charge at Kehukee to Elder 
William Burges. After continuing in Sussex for a 
few years, a large and very respectable church was 
gathered, and Elder Megiamre continued to be their 
pastor as long as he was gapafcrle of preaching. 
He very frequently attended the Association and 
almost every Association acted as Moderator for 
upwards of twenty years; until the division took 
place at Davis's meeting house, and then he became 
a member of the Portsmouth Association, and gen- 
erally served that Association in the same capacity 
until his death. lie was a very useful member, 
seemed well acquainted with church discipline; but 
by reason of the asthmatic complaint, he was pre- 
vented from preaching some time before he died. 
He departed this life, December 13th, 1799, a- 
bout 3 o'clock in the afternoon, aged 69 years, 6 
months, 6 rlav?. 



108 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

Brother ELISHA BATTLE. 
Brother Elisha Battle was born in Nanse- 
mond county, Virginia, on the 9th day of January, 
1723—4. In the year of 1748, he moved to Tar 
River, Edgecombe county, North Carolina. A- 
hout the year 1764, he joined the Baptist church 
at the Falls of Tar River, and continued in full fel- 
lowship until his death. He was chosen a Deacon 
of the church, and served the church in that office 
about 28 j r ears, until he resigned by reason of old 
age. He usually attended Associations, at which 
he sometimes acted as Moderator; and was very 
suitable for that office. It is well known that he 
was a remarkable pious zealous member of society. 
He also was very useful as a statesman. About the 
year 1756 he was appointed a Justice of the Peace, 
and continued in that office until the year 1795, 
when he resigned on account of his infirmities. He 
was chosen a member of the General Assembly in 
the year 1771, and continued to represent the 
county, and was never left out for about 20 years, 
until he declined offering himself a candidate by 
reason of his advanced state in life. He served in 
that capacity throughout the war, and was in al- 
most all the State Conventions. He was a mem- 
ber of the State Convention at the formation of the 
State Constitution; and was also a member of the 
Convention for the deliberation of the Federal 
Constitution, and when the Convention formed it- 
self into a Committee of the whole House, Brother 
Battle was appointed Chairman. In 1799 he re- 
quested his youngest son to come and take posses- 
sion of the land and plantation whereon he lived 
(which he had before made him a deed for) that he 
might give up the care of a family and live with 
him. About this time he desired his children to 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 109 

meet him, that he might have some private dis- 
course with them, and concluded to have his will 
written and execute it, although he had for many 
years kept a written one by him, altering it when 
he found it necessary. He divided his property 
amongst his children, only reserving a sum of mo- 
ney 7 and notes, as security for himself in his decent 
maintenance. Soon after he was taken more un- 
well than usual, and weakened till he became so 
helpless that he could not turn in his bed. In his 
sickness he seemed to have no desire to recover; he 
said he was willing to go, but must wak the Lord's 
time. After being about eight weeks in this help- 
less condition, without the least apparent doubt of 
future felicity, he departed this life the 6th of March, 
1799, being the 76th year of his age. His funeral 
sermon was preached by Elders Gilbert and Bur- 
kitl, from Psal. xxxvii. 37. Elder Gilbert preach- 
ed from the former part of the text, viz: Mark the 
perfect man, and behold the upright. And Elder 
Burkitt preached from the latter part of the same, 
text , viz.: For the end of that man is peace. 



CHAP. VM. 

1. The happy Revival which took place in the Chur- 
ches belonging to the Kehukee Association in 1S02 
and 1803. 2. Means which the Lord blessed in 
the Revival. 3. Constitution of an Union 
Meeting. 

After a long and tedious night of' spiritual 
darkness and coldness in religion, blessed be God, 
the sable curtains are withdrawn, the day has dawn- 

fa* 



110 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

ed, and the sun of righteousness has risen with heal- 
ing on his wings. The churches appeared to be 
on a general decline. Many of the old members 
were removed from the church militant to the 
church triumphant. Some had moved to the wes- 
tern countries, and some had gone out from us, 
"that it might be made manifest that they were not 
all of us." These things reduced the number of 
members in the churches greatly. So that in some 
churches there were hardly members enough to 
hold conference, and in some other churches the 
Lord's supper was seldom administered. Iniquity 
abounded and the love of many waxed cold. The 
Association nevertheless met annually, and in eve- 
ry church there were a ftw names still left, who 
seemed anxiously concerned for a revival. There 
were but few added by baptism for several years. 
In 1789, only 15 members were added in all the 
churches. In 1790, there were 446 baptized. In 
1791, 99. In 1792, 192. In 1794, 57. In 1795, 
only 19. In 1796, only 33. In 1797, 13. In 
1798,43. In 1799, 72. In 1800, 129. At the 
Association in 1801, 138 were returned in the let- 
ters from the churches to the Association. Thus 
the work progressed but slowly, but there always 
appeared some worthy characters in every church 
sensible of the coldness of religion, and at almost 
every Association would be devising some ways 
and means to bring on a revival. As early as the 
year 1778, a revival was greatly desired, and a fast 
was proclaimed, to humble ourselves before the Lord 
and to solicit the throne of grace for a revival. In 
1 785, at Shoulder's Hill another fast was proclaimed. 
The same year, at an Association at Kehukee, it was 
agreed to set apart some time between sunset and 
dark every day, for all the churches Xq unite togs- 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. li! 

ther in prayer, and earnestly pray for a revival. 
And in 1794, the Association agreed to appoint 
the Saturday before the fourth Sunday in every 
month, a day for prayer meetings throughout the 
churches; whereon all the members of the respec- 
tive churches were requested to meet at their meet- 
ing houses or places of worship, and there for each 
of them as far as time would admit, to make earnest 
prayer and supplication to Almighty God for a 
revival of religion. Thus the means were used, 
and the request was so laudable that there was no 
doubt but the Lord would grant the desires of the 
righteous. For the Lord has promised, ask and 
ye shall receive, seek and ye shall find, knock and it 
shall be opened to you. The eyes of the Lord are 
over the righteous, and his ears are open to their 
prayers. And where the Lord puts it into the 
hearts of his people so earnestly to desire the in- 
crease of Christ's kingdom, and the revival of his 
work amongst his churches, the request is so lau- 
dable, that Christians need not doubt but the 
Lord will hear them in his own time and way. So 
when the set time to favor Zion was come, he 
heard the prayers of the Kehukee Association. 
There was a small appearance of the beginning of 
the work in Camden, and the Flat Swamp and Con- 
noho church, in 1800 — 32 this year were baptized 
in Camden, 22 in the Flat Swamp church, and 24 
at Connoho. But at the Association at Great 
Swamp in 1801, Elder Burkitt just returning from 
Tennessee and Kentucky, brought the news to this 
Association, and proclaimed it from the stage, that 
in about eight months six thousand had given a ra- 
tional account of a work of grace on their souls, and 
had been baptized in the State of Kentucky, and 
that a general stir had taken place amongst all ranks 



\ 



f 



.112 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

and societies of people, and that the work was stilt 
going on. The desirable news seemed to take 
such an uncommon effect ou the people, that nam* 
bers were crying out for mercy, and many praising 
and glorifying God. Such a Kehukee Association 
we had never before seen. The ministers all seem- 
ed alive in the work of the Lord, and every Chris- 
tian present in rapturous desire, was ready to cry, 
Thy kingdom come. The ministers and delegates 
carried the sacred flame home to their churches, 
and the fire began to kindle in the greatest part of 
the churches, and the work increased. The first 
appearance that was discovered was, great numbers 
of people attending the ministry of the word, and 
the congregations kept increasing. It was observ- 
ed in some places, that as many people would now 
meet at a meeting on a common day, as used to meet 
on a Sunday, and as many would come on Sundays 
as used to attend at great meetings. And it was 
also observed that the audience was more solemn 
and serious than usual. This was the first begin- 
ning. Thus the work began to revive in many pla- 
ces within the bounds of the Association. The 
word preached was attended with such a divine 
power, that at some meetings two or three hundred 
would be in floods of tears, and many cr} ing out 
loudly what shall we do to be saved. Another thing 
was observed, old Christians were so revived they 
were all on fire to see their neighbors, their neigh- 
bors' children and their own families so much en- 
gaged. Their souls seemed melted down in love,, 
and their strength renewed like the eagles. Many 
backsliders who had been runaway for many years, 
returned weeping home. The ministers seemed all- 
united in love, and no strife nor contention amongst 
them, and all appeared engaged to carry on the 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 113 

work, and did not seem to care whose labors were 
the most blessed so the work went on; and none of 
them seemed desirous to take the glory of it to 
themselves, which ought carefully to be observed. 
God is a jealous God, and will not suffer any of his 
creatures to take the glory of his work to them- 
selves. We hope that no person will ascribe the 
glory of the work to any person or persons what- 
ever, but to the Lord alone; for true religion is a 
work of God. The work increasing, many were 
converted, and they began to join the churches. 
In some churches where they had not received a 
member by baptism for a year or two, would now 
frequently receive, at almost every conference meet- 
ing, several members. Sometimes 12, 14, 18,20 
and 24 at several times in one day. Twenty-two 
and 24 were baptized several times at Flat Swamp-, 
Cashie, Parker's meeting house. Fishing Creek, 
Falls of Tar River, he. Some of the churches in 
the revival received nearly 200 members each. In 
four churches lying between Roanoke and Meher- 
rin rivers, in Bertie, Northampton and Hertford 
counties, were baptized in two years about 600 
members: and blessed be God the work seems yet 
progressing. The work has engaged the attention 
of all sorts of people — rich and poor, and all ranks. 
Many very respectable persons in character and of- 
fice have been called in this revival. There are a 
few churches within the bounds of the Association 
that have not as yet experienced a revival, but we 
hope for them! According to the accounts return- 
ed to the two last Associations 1500 have been ad- 
ded to the churches by baptism in the Kehukee 
Association. 

It has been objected by some that we ought not 
to number the Lord's people, and bring for exam* 



114 HISTORY op the KEHUREE 

pie the bad consequence which attended David's 
numbering the people of Israel. But we think our- 
selves justifiable in mentioning our numbers, when 
we are actuated by good principles. David might 
number them to boast of the number, and to pat 
confidence in a multitude, not considering the race 
was not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong. 
But we number them to exult in the riches of God's 
free grace, in magnifying his mercy in the conver- 
sion of thousands. We find that the scripture 
makes mention of the great addition at the day of 
Pentecost — The same day were added about three 
thousand souls. Acts, ii. 41, 

The Lord was pleased to make use of weak and 
simple means to effect great purposes, that it might 
be manifest that the work was his and not man's. 
Singing was attended with a great blessing: Elder 
Burkitt published two or three different pamphlets, 
which contained a small collection of spiritual 
songs, some of which he had brought from the 
western countries. They were in very great de- 
mand. As many as about 6000 books were dispo- 
sed of in two years. We might truly say, the time 
of singing of birds had come, and the voice of the 
turtle was heard in our land. At every meeting, 
before the minister began to preach, the congrega- 
tion was melodiously entertained with numbers 
singing delightfully, while all the congregation 
seemed in lively exercises. Nothing seemed to en- 
gage the attention of the people more; and the chil- 
dren and servants at every hoase were singing these 
melodious songs. From experience, we think, we 
can assure our readers, that we have reason to 
hope, that this, with other means, proved a blessing 
in this revival. Shaking hands while singing, was 
a means (though simple in itself) for to further the 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 115 

work. The ministers used frequently, at the close 
•of worship, to sing a spiritual song suited to the 
occasion, and go through the congregation, and 
shake hands with the people while singing; and sev- 
eral when relating their experience, at the time of 
their admission into church fellowchip, declared 
that ihis "was the first means of their conviction. 
The act seemed sofriendly, the ministers appeared so 
loving, that the party with whom the minister shook 
hands, would often be melted in tears. The hymn 

"I long to sSe the happy time, 
When sinners all come flocking home; 
To taste the riches of his love, 
And to enjoy the realms above." 

And especially that .part of it, 

"Take your companion by the hand; 
And all your children in the band," 

«~- many times had a powerful effect. Giving the 
people an invitation to come up to be prayed for i 
was also blessed. 

The ministers usually, at the close of preaching, 
would tell the congregation, that if there were any 
persons who felt themselves lost and condemned, 
under the guilt and burden of their sins, that if they 
would come near the stage, and kneel down, they 
would pray for them. Shame at first kept many 
back, but as the work increased, numbers apparent- 
ly under strong conviction would come and fall 
down before the Lord at the feet of the ministers, 
and crave an interest in their prayers. Sometimes 
twenty or thirty at a time. And at some Union 
Meetings, two or three hundred would come, and 
try to come as near as they could. This very 
much engaged the ministers; and many confessed 
that the Lord heard the prayers of his ministers, 
and they had reason Jo hape their souls were 



116 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

relieved from the burden of their sins, through the 
blood of Christ. It had a powerful effect on the 
spectators to see their wives, their husbands, chil- 
dren, neighbors, &c. so solicitous for the salvation 
of their souls; and was sometimes a means of their 
conviction. Many ladies of quality, at times were 
so powerfully wrought on, as to come and kneel 
down in the dust in their silks to be prayed for. 
The act of coming to be prayed for in this manner 
had a good effect on the persons who came, in that 
they knew the eyes of the congregation were on 
them, and if they did fall off afterwards it would be 
a disgrace to them, and cause others to deride them; 
this therefore was a spur to push them forward. 

Relating experiences, and the administration of 
the ordinance of baptism were greatly blessed in 
this revival. When the churches held conference 
to receive members (which they always did in a 
public assembly) the congregation would draw up 
in such crowds, as they would tread one on anoth- 
er, anxious to hear the experiences of their neigh- 
bors and families. And while the candidates were 
relating their experience, the audience would be in 
floods of tears, and some almost convulsed, while 
their children, companions and friends were rela- 
ting their conversion. And several declared this 
was the means of their conviction. 

And when the ordinance of baptism was admin- 
istered, nothing had a more solemn effect. Some- 
times fifteen or twenty would be received at one 
time; and at the time appointed for baptism, great 
numbers would attend; from 200 to 1000 and more 
would assemble at such times. And then to see 
fifteen or twenty persons suitably attired, to go into 
the water, who usually stood in a row, a small dis- 
tance from the water, hand in hand, and the min- 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 117 

ister joining the rank at the head, would march 
down into the water regularly, like soldiers of Je- 
sus, singing as they went, 

"Come all ye mourning souls who seek rest in Jesus' love, 
Who set your whole affections on things that are above; 
Come let us join together and hand in hand go on, 
Until we come to Canaan, where we no more shall 
mourn," 

— would take a solemn effect on the numerous as- 
sembly. Numbers would be in floods of tears, and 
so greatly affected could scarcely stand, while they 
would express their sincere wishes that they were 
prepared to go in with their children and com- 
panions. 

Sometimes they had the pleasure to see the fa- 
ther and the son, the mother and her daughter, the 
wife and the husband, go into the water together 
hand in hand. This proved conviction to many. 
Thus the Lord carried on his work. 

Evening Meetings were greatly blessed. Some 
years past it was customary to hold night meet- 
ings; but for sometime they were disused. When 
the revival commenced they began to revive. In 
some neighborhoods they met once a week on an 
evening; and numbers would attend. At some- 
times, and in some places, nearly 200 people would 
meet, and some people would come ten miles to a 
night meeting. And when they had the opportu- 
nity for a minister to attend them, they usually had 
a sermon preached, and the rest of the time they 
were together, would be spent in exhortation, sing- 
ing and prayer. And we are fully satisfied the 
Lord blessed these meetings. 

Where they had not the privilege of a minister 
to attend and preach, the time would be spent in 
•singing, exhortation, prayer, religious conversation, 
11 



US HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

&c. Sometimes they would tell each other then 
experiences and examine others whether they had 
any experience to relate. Thus the work went on. 

Union Meetings have also been attended with a 
blessing. An Union Meeting consists of several 
churches, being convenient to one another, of the 
same faith and order, who meet at stated times to 
confer in love, about matters relating to peace, 
brotherly union, and general fellowship. The time 
the meeting holds is generally three days. On the 
first day when they meet one of the ministers de- 
livers a suitable sermon introductory to business; 
then all the brethren present from every church, who 
are in fellowship, sit in conference, and any brother 
is at liberty to propose such cases of* conscience, as 
he wants advice on; or any difficult passage of scrip- 
ture on which he wants light; or any thing else 
which tends to the harmony of the churches, or to 
love and peace amongst brethren. And when the 
conference adjourns, the rest of the time is employ- 
ed in preaching, praying, singing, &c. 

There are four Union Meetings within the bounds 
of the Kehukee Association, viz: On the east side 
of Chowan .River, which is composed of the church- 
es at Cowenjock, Camden, Sawyer's Creek, 
Knobscrook, Flatty Creek, Yoppim and Ballard's 
Bridge. The Bertie union meeting is composed 
of the Bertie, Cashie, Wiccacon, Meherrin and 
Connaritsey churches. Flat Swamp union meet- 
ing comprehends the Flat Swamp, the Great 
Swamp, Connoho, Skewarkey and Morattuck 
-'churches. The Swift Creek union meeting con- 
tains the churches at the Falls of Tar River, Kehu- 
kee, Fishing Creek, Rocky Swamp and Quaukey. 
Th re are a few churches that have not joined in 
any of these Union Meetings. We do not know 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 119 

t^hat is the reason, unless it be on account of the iu- 
conveniency of their local situation. 

To give orrr readers a more general idea of the 
nature of an Union Meeting, we will insert the Con- 
stitution of one of them, and we presume, that in 
substance they are all nearly similar. 

Constitution of the Bertie Union Meeting. 

Article I. This meeting shall in future consist of the 
.members who may attend the same, from Bertie, Cash- 
ie, Wiccacon, Meherrin and Connaritsey churches, and 
members who may attend the same at their respective^ 
appointments from all sister churches and Associations. 

II. This meeting shall be known by the name of the 
"Bertie Union Meeting." 

III. Each meeting shall have power to adjourn them- 
selves to any time or place they may see proper; so that 
the different churches in the union be equally benefitted 
by their several appointments. 

IV. When assembled they shall make choice of a 
Moderator and Clerk; and the Clerk of said meeting 
shall enter the minutes of the conference, and transmit 
them to the next -.meeting. 

V. A book shall be procured, in which all the minutes 
of the different conferences shall be inserted from time 
to time, and a person appointed to record the same.. 

VI. In time of conference, each member shall be en- 
titled to the liberty of speech, and shall first arise and 
address the Moderator. 

VII. No person snail beadmitted to speak more than- 
three times to any one subject, without liberty from the 
conference. 

VIII. Any motion made and seconded, shall come un- 
der the consideration of the meeting, unless withdrawn 
by the person who made it. 

IX. Every case or query presented in writing shall be 
twice read, if required; and before debated, shall be re- 
ceived by a majority of the meeting then present. 

X. New churches that may hereafter be constituted, 
or are now constituted, lying and being within the 

^bounds of Roanoke and Metierrin Rivers, or convenient 
thereto, may be admitted into this union. 
XL At the time of conference a door shall fre-opened 



120 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

for the admission of members by the ordinance of bap- 
tism. 

XII. The ordinance of the Lord's supper shall be ad- 
ministered at the time of each union meeting, on one of 
the days which the conference may appoint. 

XIII. The meeting shall be opened and closed by 
p layer. 

These Union Meetings were attended with a very 
great blessing. At some of them three or four 
thousand people would meet, and some times fif- 
teen or sixteen ministers attend. Great numbers 
were solemnly affected, and at times, we have rea- 
son to believe, many got converted. At an Union 
Meeting at Eider Hendry's meeting house in Ber- 
tie, June, 1803, a very worthy character, who had 
been Senator for that county, and having been so- 
lemnly impressed with a sense of his lost state by 
nature for sometime before, under preaching on 
Sunday, received comfort, and hoped that his soul 
got converted: And when the minister concluded 
preaching, arose from his seat, and stood on a bench, 
and told the people, "Thai he had many times been 
a Candidate at Elections, but he was now a Candi- 
date for the Kingdom of Heaven " And being over- 
powered with the love of God fell backwards off the 
seat, but was upholder) by some of the bystanders* 
When he was baptized, which was a few weeks af- 
ter, nearly 1000 people were present; and at the side 
of the water lie addressed the spectators thus: "I 
perceive, said he, several of my friends and old com- 
panions standing rounc 1 ; and I can truly say I love 
you, but I cannot continue with you, in the ways we 
have so long been in, and if you will not go with 
me, I must leave you;" and so bade them farewell, 
and went into the water. 

At an Union Meeting at Parker's meeting house, 
August, 1803, it was supposed there were 4000 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 121 

people. The weather proved very rainy on Sun* 
day. There was a stage erected in the meeting 
house yard; and at about half after 11 o'clock, El- 
der Burkilt ascended the stage to preach, and it was 
expected from the appearance of the clouds it would 
rain every moment, and before he was done prea- 
ching it did so. Yet notwithstanding the nume- 
rous congregation still kept together; and although 
every effort was used to shun the rain, by umbrel- 
las, carriages, blankets, &c. yet we believe 1000 
people were exposed to the rain without any shel- 
ter; and some crying, some eonvulsed to the ground, 
some begging the ministers to pray for them; and 
they composedly stood and received the falling 
shower without ever being dispersed. 

And it is not only at particular times,- but blessed 
be God, these meetings are generally blessed. Of 
that men would praise the Lord for his goodness, 
and his wonderful works to the children of menf 
We feel ourselves very happy, and thankful at this 
time for the visitation of the Lord. 0! that he 
would continue his work until the whole world is 
brought into subjection to the peaceable reign of 
Christ, the Prince of Peace; and that the whole 
earth may be filled vviih his glory. And his know* 
ledge cover the earth as the waters do the seas. 

This gracious work in this Association, has been 
differently manifested in its operations, and the ef- 
fects it took on the people. Some were deeply af- 
fected under a sense of their lost state, and their 
hearts ready to burst within them, whilst reflecting 
on their past conduct; yet under the ministry of 
the word made no noise. Others sensible of these 
things were in floods of tears, and at last constrain- 
ed to give vent to their passions, and cry out in the 
presence of the multitude, What must I do to bs 
saved? Some were taken with a tremo?* 7 like a fii 
11* 



122 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

of the ague. And others fell to the ground like a 
person in a swoon, and continued helpless and mo- 
tionless for some time; and this power was mani- 
fest at times, on persons at home about their secu- 
lar concerns in the house, and in the field. 

Whatever infidels may say in opposition to the 
work id this Association, stubborn reason is obli- 
ged to decide in favor of this revival. It is evi- 
dent it was from God, from the good effects it took 
on the people, and the tendency it had to moralize 
them. Persons of the most dissolute lives, as 
drunkards, swearers, liars, thieves, &c. became so- 
ber,, punctual, honest, virtuous persons. Surely 
that religion must be of God that makes people 
godly from good principles; that makes better hus- 
bands, better wives, better children, more obedient 
servants, better masters, better neighbors and bet- 
ter citizens. This the work has evidently done. 
Let the politician with all his maxims of policy; the 
deist with all his deistical reasoning, endeavoring 
to invalidate the divine authority of the holy scrip- 
tures; the soldier with all his arms and ammuni- 
tion, see if any or all of them together, can by all 
their art, sophistry or power, or even by the force 
of gunpowder, effect such a reformation in the 
morals of men. Can they do what the simplicity 
of the gospel of our dear Lord Jesus has done? 
Can they make those who hate God and religion 
with all their hearts, love him and his service? 
Can they make men at variance and enmity love 
one another? This the gospel has done in this re- 
vival. In some neighborhoods, persons at enmity 
with each other, and when they met would not 
speak to one another, after receiving the benefits of 
the gospel's gracious influence, could take each 
other in their arms with the greatest pleasure, and 
cause an unbelieving world to say ; Behold how 
these Christians love. 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. I2S 

CHAP. VIII. 

1 . On the Nature of Circular Letters. 2. A Let- 
ter "On the Maintenance of the Ministry ," 
for 1191, by Elder Martin Ross. 3. "On the 
final perseverance of the Saints in Grace" 
for 1794, by Elder Lancaster. 4. "On Good 
Works," for 1SOO, by Elder Gilbert. 

Ever since the second year after the minutes 
were first printed, which was in the year 1790, it 
has been customary for the Association to address 
the churches by way of circular letters. The cus- 
tom is, to appoint some minister, the year before, 
to prepare one against the next Association. At 
first it was the practice to name a subject; but of 
iate the minister is at liberty to choose his subject. 
The letter thus prepared is brought to the Associa- 
tion, and if approved by them is printed in the 
minutes. 

We have thought proper to insert in this Histo- 
ry, a few of those letters on the most interesting 
subjects; which will not only give our readers an 
idea of the nature of these letters; but it is hoped, 
from the magnitude of the subjects in them discus- 
sed, will be both pleasing and profitable to the im- 
partial inquirer. 

(CIRCULAR LETTER.) 

The Messengers of the several Baptist churches 
belonging to the United Baptist Association, 
formerly called the Kehukee Association, met 
at the Flat Swamp meeting house, in Pitt 
county, North Carolina, October, 1791: To 
the several churches in union with this Asso- 
ciation, send greeting: 
Dearly beloved Brethren, 



124 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

Our divine Lord and Master, in the course of 
an indulgent providence, hath favoured us with an- 
other anniversary interview, by which we obtain 
knowledge of the circumstances of the churches 
that compose this convention; and we also received 
agreeable information concerning the interest and 
growth of our adorable Redeemer's kingdom m 
many other places. And it must give peculiar 
pleasure to every gracious soul to hear, "that he 
who sitteth between the cherubims has stretched 
forth his mighty arm, and is making a willing peo- 
ple in the day of his power." 

And since Almighly God in carrying on this 
glorious work, is pleased by the foolishness of 
preaching to save them that believe, it therefore be- 
comes necessary that there should be a number of 
preachers or ministers of the gospel. And accord- 
ing to the direction of our last Association, we pro- 
ceed, in our circular letter, at this time, to make a 
few observations on the necessary support or main- 
tenance of gospel ministers; although we ar? very 
sorry that there should be the least occasion to 
write or speak upon that subject. 

We apprehend that one principal reason why the 
churches have been so remiss in this duty is because 
the people have been for a number of years griev- 
ously oppressed by an ecclesiastical establishment,* 
in raising money for the support of ministers of a 
contrary sentiment, many of whom they had reason 
to fear God never sent to preach, but only preach- 
ed for hire and divined for money, and regarded 
\he fleece more than \he flock. To shun this extreme, 
many zealous preachers, who abhorred their works 

*We would not be understood to insinuate that those 
establishments do yet remain, they have been wholly 
removed and finally abolished in this State, by the late 
i«ost glorious Revolution* 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 125 

of darkness and deceit, being sensible that such 
men crept into the ministry for the sake of filthy 
lucre, have thought it lheir duty to bear public tes- 
timony against them. But not being careful to dis- 
tinguish between living of the gospel of Christ, 
and being supported by the laws of men, those 
zealots have injudiciously condemned the practice 
of receiving any thing at all as a reward for minis- 
terial labors, and so have fallen into an error on 
the other hand. It is therefore necessary that a 
just mediocrity be .observed between the two ex- 
tremes. 

To guard against the error on both hands, it is ne- 
cessary, dear brethren, we should make the holy 
scriptures the rule of our faith and practice. That 
ministers have a divine right to maintenance from 
the people is evident: 

1. From the express declaration of Jesus Christ, 
Matt. x. 9, 10: "Provide neither gold nor silver, 
nor brass in your purses, nor scrip for your jour- 
ney; neither two coats, neither shoes, nor yet 
staves; for the workman is worthy of his meat — and 
the laborer of his hire." Luke x. 9. 

2. This right the Apostles published throughout 
the world, 1 Cor. ix 14: "Even so hath the Lord 
ordained, that they which preach the gospel, should 
live of the gospel." Gal. vi. 6: "Let him that 
is taught in the word, communicate to him that 
teacheth in all good things. " 

3. This divine right of the minister's mainten- 
ance is manifested by the law of nature. Deut. 
xxv. 4. — 1 Tim. v. 18: "Thuu shall not muzzlfc 
the ox that treadeth out the corn — and the laborer 
is worthy of his reward." 

4. By the law of nations. "Who goeth a war- 
fare at any time at his own charges?" I Cor. ix. 7. 

5. By th? laws of farmers, graziers, vine plan* 



126 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

ters, reapers, threshers, &c. 1 Cor. ix. 7: "Who 
planteth a vineyard and eateth not of the fruit 
thereof? Or who feedeth a flock, and eateth not of 
the milk of the flock?" 1 Cor. ix. 10, 11: "For 
our sakes no doubt this is written: that he that 
ploweth should ptow in hope; and he that thresheth 
in hope should be partaker of his hope. If we have 
sown unto you; spiritual things, is it a great thing 
if we shall reap your carnal things?" 

6. By the Levitical law. 1 Cor. ix. 13: "Do 
you not know that they which minister about holy 
things, live of the things of the temple; and Ihey 
which wail at the altar, are partakers with the al- 
tar?" 

Thus have we, dear brethren, clearly proven 
from express scripture, that the ministers of the 
gospel are justly entitled to a comfortable mainten- 
ance from the people. The ministers support 
should be sufficient and plentiful, because they are 
enjoined hospitality. The matter of their main- 
tenance is expressed in terms so general, as to leave 
the people at liberty to pay them in kind, or value, 
all good things. The manner of paying, is, cheer- 
fully, and not grudgingly. — The contributors 
are all who "are taught in the word." 

The truth of these things, beloved brethren, we 
make no doubt you are convinced of, but the neg- 
lect of them is too glaring to us, yourselves and 
others. We cannot but feel exceeding sorry on 
this account. The consequences arising there- 
from are very pernicious. By this sad neglect the 
poor ministers of the gospel are necessarily obliged 
to follow their worldly avocations for the support 
of themselves and their families, which prevents 
them from reading the holy scriptures, meditating, 
preaching constantly, and giving themselves whol- 
ly to the work— which weakens their hands, dulls 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 127 

their ideas, cook their zeal, and of necessity they 
are not so profitable to the churches, nor to the 
cause of Christ in general. These things, in a mea- 
sure, you must be sensible of. Much more might 
be said upon this subject, but the bounds of a circu- 
lar letter will not admit of it 

Thus have we, dear brethren, (pursuant to an 
ordinance of our last Association) endeavored to 
consider this important duty, and now permit us 
affectionately and solemnly to call upon you to con- 
sider our adorable Master's weighty and powerful 
expostulations — "Why call ye me Lord, Lord, and 
do not the things I say? Ye are my friends if ye 
do whatsoever I command you. If ye love me keep 
my commandments. He that saith I know him, 
and keepeth not his commandments, is a liar and 
the truth is not in him. My little children, let us 
ziot love in word, neither in tongue; but in deed, 
and in truth." — Luke vi. 46. John xiv. 15. xy, 
14. 1 John ii. 4. 1 John iii. 18. 

Finally, brethren, those things which ye have 
.both learned, and received, and heard and seen, do, 
and the God of peace shall be with you. 

Signed by order of the Association, 

NATHAN MAYO, Moderator, 
LEMUEL BURKITT, Clerk. 

(CIRCULAR LETTER.) 

The Elders and Messengers of the several Baptist 
Churches belonging to the Kehukee Association, 
met at Brother BurkitCs meeting house, on San- 
dy Run, in Bertie county, JV. Carolina, Septem- 
ber, 1794 — The Churches in union with this As- 
sociation, send their Christian salutation. 

BELOVED BRETHREN, 

Being favored by Divine Providence, we have 



123 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

once more had a profitable and pleasing interview 
at ttie time and place appointed. The business we 
have transacted, you have in our minutes, which we 
hope will meet with your concurrence and appro- 
bation. 

The subject of our Circular Letter this year, ac- 
cording to a resolve of our last, is to be "The final 
perseverance of the saints in grace." And as the 
subject is inseparably connected with, and a con- 
comitant of, that God exalting, soul reviving, doc- 
trine of particular election, and free, unmerited 
grace in Christ Jesus, we doubt not of its being 
cordially received by you, and perused both with 
pleasure and satisfaction. 

To do ample justice to a subject of this magni- 
tude, so copious in its nature and interesting in its 
consequences, would very far exceed the bounds of 
a Circular Letter. We shall therefore only offer a 
few reasons, supported by the best authority, in fa- 
vor of it. And first a strong and undeniable rea- 
son in support of the doctrine, may be fairly drawn 
from the covenant made with Noah: the tenor of 
which was, that God would no more drown the 
world by water — see Gen. ix. Now we do not, 
neither can we, without being guilty of the most 
daring and gross impiety, call in question or dis- 
pute the veracity of God in this solemn promise; 
niether can any call in question the final persever- 
ance of (he saints in grace, without being guilty of 
offering the most daring insults to the God of truth; 
for the preservation of the one, and the security of 
the other, is, in every point of view, marked with 
the same awful solemnity of an oath. For the 
truth of which we beg leave to refer you to that 
memorable passage in Isa. liv. 9, 10: "For this 
Is as the waters of Noah unto me; for as I have 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. \29 

sworn that the waters of Noah no more shall cover 
the earth, so have I sworn that I would not be wrQth 
with thee, nor rebuke thee. — For the mountains 
shall depart and the hills be removed, but my kind- 
ness shall not depart from thee, neither shall the 
covenant of my peace be removed, saith the Lord 
that hath mercy on thee." 

From the premises thus laid down by inspiration 
itself, the conclusion is very natural and obvious, 
viz: That the people of God have no more reason 
to doubt of their security in Christ, and final per- 
severance in grace, than they have that God contra- 
ry to his oath, will send a second deluge of water and 
drown the world. And whoever disputes the one 
or the other, is so far an infidel, and deserves no 
better title from men. 

Another authority perfectly similar to the above 
Cjtioted passage we find recorded by that great 
champion of truth, and patron of the saints final 
perseverance in grace, in Heb. vi. 17, 18: "Wher- 
ifi God willing more abundantly to shew unto the 
heirs of promise the immutability of his counsel, 
confirmed it by an oath — That by two immutable 
things, in which it was impossible for God to lie, 
we might have a strong consolation who have fled 
for refuge to lay hold upon the hope set before us." 
Here we find the Apostle speaks ofthe heirs of prom- 
ise who are believers; 2. ofthe immutabilily of 
Go(i ? s council, i. e. respecting the promise and ihe, 
heirs of it, which he says was confirmed by an 
oath — the reason of which was, that we might have 
a strong consolation who have fled for refuge to lay 
hold on the hope set before us; which hope, the 
Apostle saith with great propriety, is an anchor of 
Hhe soul, neither does he give the least hint f 'f any t 
danger of this anchor giving wuy, so as not to aft- 
12 



ilSO HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

swer the purpose for which it was intended, but or* 
the contrary, declares unequivocally, and we may 
add unconditionally also, that it is both sure and 
steadfast. Whieh shews most clearly, that Noah 
was not more safe when shut up in the ark, than be- 
lievers are whose lives are hid with Christ in God. 
Again, we are informed by ihe same Apostle, Rom, 
viii. 28: "That all things work together for good 
to them that love God" — then consequently nothing 
can work for their destruction. Again, Jer. xxxii. 
40: " And I will make an everlasting covenant with 
them, that I will not turn away from them to do 
them good." But it is objected they may turn a- 
way from him, and so finally perish: To which 
we reply, that the same covenant provides against 
that also, for in the same verse God says: "I will 
put my fear in their hearts that they shall not de- 
part from me." So if God has said that he will 
not turn away from his people, and that he will nev- 
er leave nor forsake them, (Heb. xiii. 5.) and that 
they shall not depart from him — -then surely that 
man must have a front of brass, and not the fear of 
God before his eyes, that can dispute the point with 
his maker, and say the. union may be dissolved, and 
believers in Christ may finally perish. 

As a further confirmation of the doctrine contend- 
ed for, we offer to your consideration the following 
scriptures. Psal. .xxxvii. 23,24: "The steps of a 
good man are ordered by the Lord; and he delight- 
eth in his way. Though he fall, he shall not be 
utterly cast down. : for the Lord upholdeth him with 
his hand*"— -Jsa. xlii. 1&: "And I will bring the 
blind by a way that they kne\v not; I will lead 
them in a path that they have not known: I wilj 
make darkness light before them, and crocked 
j$h)gs straight. These things will I do unto thejjj, 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 131 

grid not forsake them," — Mic. vi. 8: " Rejoice not 
against me, O mine enemy: when I fall I shall 
arise." — 1 John ii. 19: "They went out from us, 
but they were not of us: For if they had been of 
us, they would no doubt have continued with us: 
But they went out that they might be made mani- 
fest that they were not of us." 

Again, the blessed Jesus hath said, "af1 that the 
Father giveth me shall come unto me, and him that 
cometh to me I will in no wise cast out;" and fur- 
ther declares, "that it was the will of the Father that 
he should lose nothing but that he should raise it up 
at the last day." That the water be would give 
bis people (which is the graces of his spirit) should 
be in therrra well of water springing up unto ever- 
lasting life. — That he has given them eternal life, 
and that they shall never perish: And that they 
shall not come into condemnation, for they are pass- 
ed from death unto life. And because I lite (sajs 
he) ye shall live also. For a proof of which, see 
John vi. 36— 39. iv. 14. x. 28, 29. v. 24. 

Several authorities as much in point as those al- 
ready quoted, ofi'er their friendly assistance, but otfr 
scanty limits admonish us it is time to stop. We 
shall therefore beg leave to quote only two more 
scriptures, and with them we close. The first we 
bring from Rom. viii. 38, 39. There, says that 
great Apostle to the gentiles, who was well acquain- 
ted with the mind of his divine Lord and Master; 
and under the immediate inspiration of the spirit of 
God — "I am persuaded, that neither death, nor life, 
nor angels ? nor principalities, nor powers, nor 
things present nor things to come — nor height, nor 
depth, nor any other creature, shall be able to sep- 
arate us from the love of God which is in Christ Je- 
sus our Lord." The popular objection that they 



132 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

may separate themselves, is too futile to merit an 
answer; we shall therefore treat it with silence and 
deserved contempt, until it shall be made appear 
by some unheard of arguments, that a believer him- 
self is a non-entity, or no creature at all, which is 
impossible to be done. 

Let the golden chain of God's decrees, and the 
believer's privileges, bring up the rear — Rom. viii. 
29, 30: "For whom he did foreknow, he also did 
predestinate to be conformed to the image of his son, 
that he might be the first born among many breth- 
ren — Moreover, whom he did predestinate, thejn 
he also called; and whom he called, them he also 
justified; and whom hejustified, them he also glori- 
fied." Here believers is a golden chain indeed, a 
chain of God's making, and therefore cannot be 
broken by all the sophistry of men of corrupt minds, 
who exceedingly err, not knowing the scriptures noF 
the power of God. For here it may be observed, 
that those of whom it is said, that they were fore- 
known, predestinated i called and justified are identi- 
cally the same people that are to be glorified — this 
being an undeniable fact, we conclude that the ar- 
gument drawn from this authority is unanswerable, 
and therefore must be finally conclusive. 

Very weighty arguments might also be drawn 
from the omnipotency, omniscience and immutabil- 
ity of God, but we have already observed that our 
limits are exceeded — therefore to conclude, we be- 
seech you, dear brethren, by the mercies of Gcd, to 
present your bodies a living sacrifice to him at all 
times — having had much forgiven, let the consider- 
ation thereof cause you to love much, and influence 
you to every good Word and work* Let not this 
blessed soul reviving doctriue be evilly spoken of 
through you; but on the contrary, let your exempla- 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 13S 

ry lives and pious conversation declare to all the 
world the blessed and happy influence the belief of 
it has on your daily conduct. Beware of thinking 
you have already attained, or already perfect;, 
which would be sure to check your pious endeav- 
ors to grow in grace, and in the knowldge, not 
only of the doctrine here laid down, but those doc-* 
irines inseparably connected with it. 

Lastly, let the consideration of your secure stand- 
ing in Christ, bear you up under all the cross-like 
and afflictive providence jou may have to meet with 
in your passage through this unfriendly world; be- 
ing fully persuaded that his promise of ''never leav- 
ing you," stands firmer than heaven or earth; and 
that according to the prayer he put up to his fath- 
er, you shall ere long be with him, not only to see 
him and behold his glory, but to adore, beyond the 
stretch of thought, his divine perfections to all eter- 
nity, where your sorrows of every description shall 
be completely doaeaw-ay, and every divine promise 
meet its full accomplishment* 

Now to Him who is able to keep you from fall- 
ing, and has promised to^ present you faultless be- 
fore the throne of his glory,, to the only wise God, 
be glory and thanksgiving throughout all churches, . 
awld without end. 5 Aniens 

Signed by order of the Association, 

NATHAN MAYO, Moderator, 
LEMUEL BURK1TT, Clerk,, 

(CIRCULAR LETTER.) 

The, Elders and Messengers of the several Baptist 
Churches belonging to the Kehukee Association, 
met at the meeting house near the Falls of Tar 
River, Nash county, North Carolina, October^. 
12* 



134 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

1800 — To the Churches in union with this As- 
sociation, send their Christian salutation* 

BELOVED BRETHREN, 

Called of God to the fellowship of his dear Son, 
and to an inheritance amongst those who are sanc- 
tified, and beloved by us, we hope we have obtain- 
ed like precious grace with you. The great satis- 
faction which you have expressed in, and the wil- 
lingness with which you have received our former 
epistles; together with a desire for your good, and 
the glory of the great Redeemer, are motives 
which induce us to address vou once more in an 
epistolary way, which we send this year on the sub- 
ject of good works, which is highly recommended 
by our Lord and Saviour, together with his proph- 
ets and apostles, and ought to be carefully observed 
by all who profess to be followers of the blessed Je- 
sus. Witness the following scriptures: Eccl. iii. 17. 
chap ix. 10 and xii. 14. Isa. xxiii. 17. James, i. 
25. Gal. vi. 4. 1 Thes. i. 3. Heb. vi. 10. Ti- 
tus, i. 16. James, ii, 1 1-21. Jonah, iii. 10. Mat. 
xxiii. 10. 2 Cor. xi. 15. Rev. xiv. 13 and xx. 12 
and 32. Acts, x. 35. Rom. ii. 10, These and 
many others abundantly testify that we were crea- 
ted in Christ Jesus unto good works, which the 
Lord before ordained that we should walk in them. 
And as the contracted limits of a circular letter will 
not admit of a full investigation of our subject, we 
shall in a few particulars show what we understand 
to be intended by the term good works. And first, 
it might not be amiss to observe, that before works 
can be called, or really deemed good works, it is 
necessary that they be the product of a true 
and genuine faith in Christ; for as "Faith without 
works is dead," so works without faith is dead also. 
Heb, h, 14. The source or fountain then ; whence 






BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 135 

good works flow is not from any expectation of me- 
rit, but purely from a principle of love to God. 

By good works, we understand works of various 
kinds, as, 1. Our duty to God. 2. Our duty to the 
Church and people of God. 3. Our duty to our 
neighbors. 4. Our duty to magistrates, or earthly 
rulers. 5. Our duty to our family, and lastly to 
ourselves. 1. Our duty to God is, to consider him 
as the cause of our existence, our great benefactor, 
and sole author of all cur happiness in time and 
eternity: to love hiin above any earthly enjoyment: 
yea with all our heart, soul, mind and strength. 
We should use our utmost endeavor to keep his 
commandments, and have respect to all his pre* 
cepts. But as our duty to God is inseparably con- 
nected with our duty in other particulars, we pass 
on, 2. To our duty to the church and people of 
God. As our Lord and Saviour has loved us and 
given himself for us, that he might deliver us from 
the curse of the law and the flames of devouring 
tire, and hath taken us from the wild stock of na- 
ture, made us all to drink of the same fountain of 
his everlasting love, and so tempered our spirits as 
to unite us together, not by tyrannical chains, but 
by the sweetest bands of love and fellowship; and 
declared us to be a select body by him chosen, and 
set apart from the world, it becomes our duty then 
to walk as people who are not of the world, but cho- 
sen of God and bound for the heavenly Canaan f 
having given our hands and hearts to each other, to 
endeavor to keep the unity of the spirit in the bond 
of peace, to strengthen, comfort, uphold, encourage, 
watch over and to pray with and for one another, to 
bear one another's burdens, and "so fulfil the royal 
law of Christ." Our Lord has compared his church 
to a company of horse in Pharaoh's chariot — hente 



136 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

it appears that all have something to do in the 
church of Christ, that none should be barren nor 
unfruitful. The Lord has made it our duty often 
to assemble ourselves together, and we are exhort- 
ed by an apostle not to forsake it as the manner of 
some was. We hope you will, therefore, endeavor 
as oft as possible to attend your church meetings, 
and places of public worship. We hear of cold- 
ness among some of you — what else can be expect- 
ed? when the church members so seldom see each 
other, they become in a manner strange and useless 
to one another, while some perhaps seldom, and 
others scarcely ever, attend conference at all. 
Dear brethren, pray consider the worthy name by 
which you are called, and the honor of that cause 
in which you are enlisted; you are called the light 
of the world, but how can your light be useful when 
many even of the people of the world, are more 
careful to attend on worship, yea even conferences 
too, than many who profess to be followers of the 
blessed Jesus. While thus backward or careless in 
attending your conferences and places of public 
worship, you wound and grieve your brethren, and 
weaken the hands of your ministers, who after corn* 
ing perhaps many miles to endeavor to comfort you, 
find themselves oft times under the disagreeable 
necessity of preaching almost to the naked walls, 
or not at all* The few hearers they may have be*** 
Ing chiefly those who make no profession of reli- 
gion, while the members of the church are busily 
engaged at home, and cannot take time to attend on 
the worship of God, and many times kept back for* 
a small excuse even on the Lord's day. 

TbirdU', our duty to love our neighbor is to 
him as ourself, to be kind and charitable to all 
whose needs may require it, be they strangers or 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 137 

acquaintances, without respect of*persons; to visit 
ihe sick, the fatherless and the widow in their afflic- 
tions, endeavoring to nourish and comfort them 
as far as in us lies; also to receive strangers, use 
them kindly, clothe the naked, feed the hungry, 
and to be careful to consider the poor and needy, 
and grant them relief according to our ability. 
Beware of covetouSness, remember the kingdom of 
God is not in meat and drink, but love, p^ace and 
joy in the Holy Ghost; therefore, glorify God and 
comfort your fellow creatures with what you pos- 
sess. 

Fourthly, we should obey magistrates, and all 
those who are put in authority to rule over us in our 
temporal affairs. We should not speak evil, nor 
reproachfully of them, but acknowledge their au- 
thority, and honor them as ministers of God, by 
him appointed for the punishment of evil doers, and 
the protection of those who wish to do well; we 
should therefore shew all good fidelity as patrons of 
good works and a light to the w©rld, that we bring 
not reproach on the Church of Christ, nor cause 
to be blamed that holy name by which we are 
called. 

Fifthly, our duty to our family, which appears 
very extensive when we consider ourselves, in re- 
spect to them, not only as stewards, who have to 
give an account of our stewardship to God, but as 
it were, as prophets, priests, and kings. Asa proph- 
et, we should teach and instruct them; as a priest 
we should pray with and for them, and should be 
careful in the order of their government. Each 
one to whom God has committed the care of souls, 
or a family which is the same thing, should consider 
himself as their teacher, to whom all the family 
look, and from whom they all expect to receive 



138 HISTORY o* the KEHUKEE 

their instruction, as it is well known that children 
in their tender years are naturally led to think the 
judgment, council, ways and behavior of their 
parents to be superior to all others, especially when 
parents or rulers exercise a proper authority. Ev- 
ery family should have one, and only one proper 
head who should take the government thereof, and 
in all cases endeavor to rule with justice, having 
a particular regard for all about him, setting forth 
good examplesj walking in the ways of godlinessr 
and true piety, praying with and for them oft; yea- 
w T e are exhorted to "pray without ceasing," and ir? 
every thing to give thanks. If we neglect public 
prayer, praise and thanksgiving in our families, do' 
we not leave them all to walk io the dark, as it were? 
while we suffer our light to be hidden under the 
bushel of worldly cares, or under the bed of sloth, 
while we ourselves walk unworthy the christian 
name. A family should not be governed by pas- 
sion, justice should be tempered with judgment and 
mercy. In vain does the passionate, fractious, tur- 
bulent and inconsiderate person, after being the 
cause of a whole day's unhappiness and discontent 
in his family, at night, call on all or any of them to 
join him in the worship of God, while every mind 
is filled with prejudice, every eye with evil, and ev- 
ery tongue ready to say, physician heal thyself, or, 
^tho© hypocrite first cast out the beam out of thine 
own eye." Therefore every ruler of a family 
should always remember that example has the most 
powerful influence, without which all our admoni- 
tion, will in all probability prove ineffectual. Par- 
ents should be careful to preserve and cultivate the 
morals of their children^ they shpuld use their au- 
thority and not gratify them in their own wicked 
desireSj such as frolicking, vain company keeping^ 






BAPTIST ASSOCIATION.. I3£ 

gaming, idle visits on the Lord's day, he. but 
should on that day carry them to places of public 
♦worship, and after they return, endeavor io im- 
press upon their minds the things they heard. For 
after giving too great a loose io the reins of .our 
children's lusts, we shall find our reproofs to be in 
vain. Witness the sons of Eli, 1 Sam. li. 23, 24, 
25. And Solomon says, "Chasten thy son while 
there is hope, and let not thy soiri -spare for his cry- 
ing." Prov. xix. 18. If we cannot command the 
hearts of our children and family to make them 
pray, and love God, we may teach and admonish 
them; and should all our endeavors fail, we may 
lastly have recourse Xo the example of Job. Job, 
i. 5. 

And further, with respect to the observation of 
good works relative to family duty, it becomes every 
member of a family to practice the particular duties 
in the respective places, our Divine Lord and Mas?- 
ler has placed us in, as husbands to love their wives 
and be not bitter against them. Wives to submit 
themselves to their owu husbands. Servants to be 
obedient to their masters, and please them well in 
all things. Masters to give unto their servants that 
which is just and equal. Parents not to provoke 
their children to anger lest they he discouraged; as 
well as for children toobey their parents. Col. iii. 

Lastly, we should look to our own souls, strive 
to walk humbly with God, and study to shew our- 
selves approved of him in all things, patrons of good 
works, and endeavor to keep a conscience void of 
offence, to check and keep under as much as possi- 
ble all our unruly passions; to watch and pray, and 
avoid, as far as in us lies, giving any cause where- 
by the enemies of the Lord may speak evil of as 
pr blaspheme that worthy name by which we are 



140 IftSTORY of the KEHUKEE 

called. Ready at all times to reprove vice, strid- 
ing to confirm all our reproofs, counsels or admonU 
tions by a regular life, pious walk, and godly con- 
versation. We should be careful to read and study 
the scriptures, and often to withdraw from the hur- 
ries of life to secret prayer and meditation; for 
where these duties are neglected, our case becomes 
very alarming, we then grow cold, backslide, and in 
a particular manner may give the enemy of souls 
great advantage over us. 

And now may the kind and good-Lord strength- 
en, uphold, and enable you to watch and pray, fill 
you with every good word and work, comfort you 
abundantly, and preserve you blameless until his 
second appearance to visit his sleeping saints, and 
to be admired by all who love him, and long for his 
glorious appearance- Amen. 
Signed by order. 

NATHAN MAYO, Moderator. 
LEMUEL BURKITT, Cleric. 



CHAP. IX. 

1. What a (rue Charch of Christ is 7 the Manner 
of receiving Members, Constitution, Discipline, 
Officers, fyc. Memoirs of Elders Done, Cole, 
Walker <tndfCrocker. 

Having gone through the material parts of the 
History of the Association, we shall now proceed to 
say something about a Church of Christ; its Con- 
stitution, Officers, their Ordination, Church Gov- 
ernment, tic. 

A church of Christ is a congregation of men and 
women, publicly professing faith in Christ Jesus, 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 141 

and being regularly baptized by immersion, who 
have covenanted together, given themselves up to 
one another in the Lord, to be governed by his 
word, and to be guided by a regular and proper 
discipline, agreeably to the Holy Scriptures. [See 
Preface.] 

The customary way which the Baptist churches 
in the Kehukee Association, receive members into 
church fellowship, is, for the person who is desi- 
rous of admission into the church, to attend at 
church conferences; and when conference sits, to 
come into the church, and signify his intention to 
■the minister, or some of the members; and the 
church then sitting, the party who applies shall re- 
late his experience, setting forth how the Lord awa- 
kened him, and brought him to a sense of his lost 
state by nature; how he had seen the insufficiency 
of his own works to save him: And how the Lord 
had revealed to him the way of life and salvation 
through Jesus Christ; and the reasons he has to be- 
lieve that he is interested in this glorious plan; and 
the evidences that he has become a new creature. 
If any doubt remain, the minister, or any of the 
members present, ask such questions as are necessa- 
ry relative thereto; and satisfaction being obtained, 
then the minister usually asks the church respecting 
the life and conversation of the candidate. And if 
there be general satisfaction, the minister and mem- 
bers give him the right hand of fellowship. Then 
a time is appointed for his baptism; and being as- 
sembled at the side of some convenient water, after 
singing and prayer, the minister takes the candidate 
by the hand, and leads him into the water; and at ihe 
same time having hold of the hands of the party to be 
baptized in one of his, and the other hand holding 
bv a handkerchief tied fast round his head, shall 
13 



142 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

dip him discreetly backwards,* all under water, ex- 
pressing these words, or some similar thereto: "In 
the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, and by the au- 
thority of our office, I baptize thee, in the name of 
the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost." 
After the solemnity is performed, they both coming 
up out of the water, join the congregation in singing? 

"Do we not know that solemn word, 
That we are buried with the Lord; 
Baptiz'd into his death, and then 
Put off the body of our sin," &c. 

— At the water, the newly baptized person is met 
by the brethren, who sometimes salute him thusr 
"You are welcome to xhe cross, dear brother." 

Some years past it was usual, after the party 
baptized was dressed, and had come into the con- 
gregation, for the minister to lay his hands on him 
and pray. But of late years the practice of lading 
on of hands on baptized members is disused in the 
Kehukee Association; as it is thought the few pas- 
sages which mention it in the New Testament, al- 
lude to miraculous gifts being conveyed, by the lay- 
ing on of the hands of inspired men in the Aposto- 
lic days. 

As to the number sufficient to constitute a church, 
we do not know the scriptures point out* Some 
suppose it is necessary there should be thirteen, be- 
cause Jesus and the twelve Apostles were present 
at the first celebration of the supper. Others des- 



*The practice of baptizing backwards, has been ob- 
jected toby some societies, and therefore has been prac- 
tised by dipping the person forwards. And some oth- 
ers, by way of ridicule, say, "They have no opinion of 
persons going to heaven backwards." To such we re- 
ply, the scriptures call baptism a burial> Rom. vi. 4. 
and we all know that it is not customary to bury people 
with their faces downward. 



baptist association. 143 

oended to seven. Tertullian to three: vbi ires ec- 
clesia est Exh. de cast, Ch. 7. Our Lord says, 
where two or three are gathered together in my 
name, I will be in the midst of them; and we read 
of churches being in some houses or families, as was 
the case with Aquilla and Priscilla, Rom. xvi. 5. 
1 Cor. xvi. 19, also that of Philemon, verse 2d. 
The church in thy house. Yet, notwithstanding, 
we are left at an uncertainty to know how many 
were in those families; nor can we suppose any par- 
ticular number is intended by our Lord. We judge 
that where there are a sufficient number to carry on 
church discipline, with suitable church officers, it 
is sufficient to constitute a church. 

In the next place we will treat of the manner in 
which a church is constituted, according to the 
mode usually practised in our Association. 

The newly constituted churches in this Associa- 
tion, are such us have been constituted out of the 
old churches, being branches or arms of the same. 
Being gathered, baptized and received members of 
such churches: And when ripe for constitution, 
usually petition the body for dismission in order 
thereto; and having obtained a regular dismission, 
a day of fasting appointed for the purpose, one or 
more ministers present, the members all should be 
present and give in a list of their names, and pro* 
duce their dismission from the body. The minis- 
ters enquire whether it is their desire to become a 
church, whether their habitations are near enough 
to each other, conveniently to attend church con- 
ferences? Whether they are so well acquainted with 
each other's life and conversation as to coalesce 
into one body, and walk together in love and fel- 
lowship? Whether it is their intention to keep up a 
regular discipline agreeably to the scriptures, to 



144 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

make God's word the rule of their conduct in 
church government, obeying his ordinances, and in 
matters of faith, and all other things relative there- 
to in a church relation, and by these things distin- 
guish themselves as a true church of Christ? These 
things being answered in the affirmative, then a 
covenant is produced, similar to that mentioned, 
page 29 and being read, consented to, and subscri- 
bed, the ministers pronounce them a church, in 
some such words as these, "In the name of our 
Lord Jesus Christ, and by the authority of our 
office, we pronounce you, [mentioning their namesj 
a true gospel church; endowed with all necessary 
power towards becoming a complete organized 
body, and the due government of yourselves; and 
therefore stand bound to make proper use of that 
power, as ye shall answer it to the head of the 
church. On whose name let us further call." 
Then they pray to God for a blessing on them, and 
conclude by singing his praise, and giving each 
other the right hand of fellowship. The church 
thus constituted* have full power to choose their 
officers, receive members, and deal with cffenders. 
The last case is, when any member transgresses, 
and sins against God, any member or members who 
are acquainted with it, ought to go and charge the 
offending brother with the crime; and if he make 
confession of his sin and appear penitent, and the 
offence be of a private nature r the dealing is car- 
ried no further. See Mat. xviii. But if it be a 
public transgression, he must be cited to appear be- 
fore the church; and being charged with the crime, 
if he confess it, and express satisfactory signs of 
repentance, he is then restored to fellowship: 
But if he prove incorrigible, he is put out of the 
communion of the church, until he be restored by 
repentance and reformation, 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 145 

The principal officers in the church are Minis- 
ters and Deacons. It has long been the opinion 
of the Association that there is no more to be con- 
tinued in the church, or that is sufficient!}' author- 
ised from the word of God. The churches in the 
Kehukee Association, at first, had ruling Elders. 
But it has a great while been the opinion of most 
of the churches belonging to that Association, that 
there are no ruling Elders mentioned in the scrip- 
tures, distinct from Teachers, who are called El- 
ders. Therefore the practice of having ruling El- 
ders, distinct from the ministers, is laid aside^ 
This subject has often been debated in the Associ- 
ation, and the only reasons which they have assign- 
ed for not having ruling Elders, when those que- 
ries have been discussed, are, 1. The word of God 
no where points out the qualifications of such 
officers, as is the case with Ministers and Deacons. 
2. No example in the New Testament of any be- 
ing called, nor the time when, and manner how 
they were ordained to office. & No work pre- 
scribed in the word of God for them to do. The 
Minister's work is pointed out, "To leach, re- 
buke, exhort," &c. The Deacon's work prescrib- 
ed, viz: "7b serve tables*" But no work poin- 
ted out for a ruling Elder. The work designed, 
for an Elder, according to Mr. Hooker and others 
would be expressly to break one of Christ's com- 
mands. If thy brother trespass against thee, says 
our Lord, go and tell him his faults: But they 
say, we must go and tell the Elders of it, and it is 
their work to try to settle it. Upon the whole we 
know not any thing they have to do, distinct from 
the Minister, Deacon,, and what is every member's- 
duty to do. 

As we hold only these two, and as the office* 
sail and ordination of a minister have been treated 
13* 



146 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

of before, we shall only give an example of the or- 
dination of a Deacon. 

It is necessary there should be two or more Dea- 
cons in every ehurch. The office of a Deacon is 
secular, extending to all the secular affairs of the 
church, Acts, vi. 2. 3, 4. His office authorises 
him to require, receive and lay out money towards 
answering the church's worldly necessity. The 
scriptures when speaking of his office notes it under 
the t?rms, business, daily ministration, helping, 
caring for the poor, collecting, distributing and 
serving tables, viz: the table of the Lord, table of 
the minister, and the table of the poor. Acts, vi. 
5. 1 Cor. xii. 2S. Gal. ii. 10. John, xii. 6. Their 
qualifications are expressed both negatively and 
positively by the Apostle Paul — Not double 
tongued, not greedy of filthy lucre; but grave, 
holding the mystery of the faith in a pure con- 
science; approved, blameless, the husband of one 
wife, ruling his children and house well, men of 
honest report, full of the Holy Ghost and wis- 
dom. 1 'rim. iji. chap. Acts, vi 3. Requisite 
lo their ordination, it is necessary there be, 1. A 
meeting of the church. 2. Two ministers present 
at the least. The ministers to enquire into their 
call and qualification; then lay hands on them and 
pray; and conclude the solemnity by a charge giv- 
en, and singing God's praise, in a hymn suitable 
to the occasion. 

1 ne Ki-hukee Association at present contains 31 
churches, viz: Bertie, Camden, Cashie, Chowan 
and Gates, Gowenjock, Connoho, Connetoe, Con- 
narifsey. Cross Roads in Edgecombe. Falls of Tar 
Rivfr, Fishing Creek, Flat Swamp, Flatty Creek, 
Great Swamp, Haywood's Meeting House in 
Franklin, Kehukee, Knobscrook, Morattuck, Mat- 
tamuskeet, Maple Spring, Pungo, Quankey, Rocky 
Swamp, Reedy Creek. Sandy Greek, Sawyer's 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 147 

Creek, Scuppernong, Skewarkey, Wiccacon, Me- 
herrin and Yoppim. 

These churches originally took their names from 
some water course near which the meeting house 
stands, and if there be no water course near, nor 
other noted place, they usually bear the name of 
the county where the churches are. And in the 
minutes of each Association, they are printed as 
they stand alphabetical!} 7 . 

The gospel, by the Baptists, was first preached 
here about 1764. Elders Henry Done, John Bur- 
ges, Henry Abbot* and William Cole, were some 
of the first Baptist ministers of our order, who 
preached about Yoppim. 

Elder HEjYRY DONE. 

Elder Done was born, raised, and baptized ia 
England; came over to America, and lived not far 
from Eden ton-. He was a man of a very extensive 
memory, had a good acquaintance with the scrip- 
tures, and a remarkable gift in prayer, and tolera- 
ble good in exhortation; but not extraordinary in 
preaching. He became a member of this church 
after it was gathered, and continued in it with ap- 
probation for several years. But by reason of his 
advanced state in life, he did not preach very fre- 
quently. He had no wife nor family; and at last 
finished his course with joy, being nearly 80 
years of age. 

Elder WILLIAM COLE. 

Elder Cole was from a small boy brought up to 
the sea, and was miraculously converted on a voy- 
age to Lisbon. While on the passage the Lord 
was pleased to shew him what a vile sinner he was, 
and his dangerous state by nature. In his distress, 
never having had a religious education, and no re- 
ligious book on board, except the Bible, he had no 
where to apply for direction but to the Lord. He 



>48 HISTORY or the KEHUKEE 

searched the scriptures, and his distress increas- 
ed to such an height, he was not able to perform 
his duty on board the vessel. He used to say, 
when his soul was overwhelmed in sorrow, and he 
read how in times of old, some would repent in 
sackcloth and ashes, he would go down in the ves- 
sel, and wallow and cover himself in a heap of sand., 
hoping the Lord would hear him, but he found no 
relief. But at last it pleased God to reveal his Son 
in him, the hope of glory; and his soul was in such 
raptures and joys, he could not contain himself 
night nor day. Praying, praising God, and ex- 
horting the sailors, were his chief employ. lie 
was Mate of the vessel, and in the absence of the 
Captain, frequently would order the sailors in his 
presence, and begin to preach to them. The 
Captain thought him mad, and threatened to have 
him put in irons. He at this time, for want of bet- 
ter information, thought he could work ?niracles f 
and often told the Captain he could drink poison, 
or walk on the water. But the Lord through his 
goodness prevented him from making the attempt. 
He at length was measurably convinced that the 
power of working miracles was ceased, from an 
attempt he made to cut off one of his toes with 
a razor, and had partly done so, but could not hea4 
it. As soon as he arrived at Edenton, he began to 
preach to the inhabitants* The people had their 
attention very much engaged, from a report which 
prevailed. It was said a man was to preach, who 
''declared he had been dead and was alive again j 
and that he should never die." Who reported it, 
we know not, but take it in a spiritual sense it 
might be true. He travelled to the south and met 
with some free will Baptists, and was baptized by 
Elder Winfield. He lived awhile near Yoppim, 
then moved 10 Princess Anne, thence to Bertie,, 
and then into Hertford county; and in or about the-* 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 149 

year 1785, he left this country, master of a vessel 
bound to the West Indies, and he nor any of his 
men ever returned again; we expect he made his 
grave in the great deep. He was a very pious 
zealous good christian, and we hope he is now 
where winds and waves can no more distress. He 
left a wife and several small children behind, who 
sometime past removed to Cumberland in Tennes- 
see* 

Elder WILLMM WALKER. 
The time and place of his nativity to us are un- 
known. He settled in Warren county, between the 
years 1750 and 55. He at first became a free will 
Baptist preacher, as was mentioned before. After 
he embraced the doctrines of grace, and was reg- 
ularly authorised as a gospel minister, he was very 
zealously engaged in preaching, and his labors 
were very much blessed. His labors in the 
ministry were not confined to Reedy Creek only, 
but he travelled and preached in a number of 
places, and was an humble instrument of bringing 
•many precious souls to the knowledge of the truth. 
Afier he was established in the truth of the doc- 
trines of the gospel, he was never known to court 
the smiles, nor fear the frowns of any man. God's 
free electing, everlasting, unchangeable love, 
through Christ to poor sinners was his favorite 
theme; whilst he pressed the necessity of the new 
birth, in consequence of our fallen degenerate state 
by nature. He was loved and esteemed by all 
ranks uf people. The labors of his life which 
closed his ministry here on earth, were Saturday 
and Sunday, October the third and fourth. 1784. 
On Saturday he attended a funeral at Mr. Hono- 
rias Powell's, and preached from Deut. xxxii. 29, 
0/ that they were were wise, &c. In the first 
part of his discourse beseemed much engaged, but 
a sudden weakness affected his mortal frame, and 



150 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

he concluded the labors of the day after going 
through his second head of doctrine. He retired 
to the house of one of the brethren, dined heartily, 
but in conversation seemed incoherent, and at 
times inclined to be wild and startish. He rested 
but very little that night, and was in a great hurry 
to get to the meeting house next morning; more so 
than was ever* known before; and said, he wished 
to go and do what he had to do. He went to meet- 
ing and took his text m the 8th chap, of Paul's 
epistle to the Romans; but could not distinctly read 
it before he was strkken with the dead palsy, and 
fell in the pulpit, and was heard to say, "Blessed 
be God I have fallen in a good cause." He was 
put into a chair and conveyed to the house where 
he lodged the night before; his reason left him and 
returned no more. He was carried to his house in 
Franklin county, on Wednesday following. It was 
observed that he scarcely ever slept from the time 
he received the stroke of the palsy. A physician 
was consulted who gave him a sleeping dose; it 
operated, and put him to sleep and he never awoke 
more in this world, but breathed out his soul into 
the bosom of his Redeemer, on Wednesday, the 
13th of September, 1784, much lamented by all 
who knew him. 

Elder M COB CROCKER. 
Elder Jacob Crockeu attended a meeting at 
his meeting house, (Haywood's, in Franklin coun- 
ty,) the first Sunday in November, 1791, and was 
greatly engaged in exhorting the people, at which 
time he said to his auditory, that he believed it 
would be the last time he should ever address them, 
which eventually proved to be no chimera, for he 
never attended a meeting after that time. The 
same evening he said to his beloved wife, "Many 
lonesome hours you have seen in shy absence, but 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 15* 

comforted yourself with the hope of my return; 
but now I am going from whence I shall no more 
return." Some days after this, his wife asked him 
if he thought he should die, he answered (with a 
smile) "I hope I shall; I have no desire to stay here 
any longer." Sometime after, he desired that she 
might resign to his death, saying "it would be but 
a short time before they should meet again." The 
day before he died^ one of his daughters being by 
his bedside a weeping, he said to her, u do not weep 
for me, I hope God has converted your soul, and if 
so, we shall .soon meet again in a better world." 
One of the brethren asked him a few hours before 
his death, how it was with him; he answered, "a 
few more struggles, and it will be eternally day 
with my soul." Thus that faithful servant of the 
Lord bid this world adieu. He was greatly la- 
mented by his pious acquaintance in general, and 
his church in particular. 



CHAP. X, 

I. Frost, an Arminian Baptist preacher, stricken 
ivith death while preaching his sentiments. 2. 
Persecution of Elders Barrow, Mintz, Walker 
and Baker. 3. Biographical sketches of Col. 
Nathan Bryan. 

In the year of 1791, there came from Europe, a 
certain Mr. Frost, in the habit of a Baptist preach- 
er, who at first seemed to be approved of; but soon 
began to deny the faith of the church, and preach 
the doctrines of free will, supposing man had pow- 
er to work himself into a state of favor with God. 
This man caused great uneasiness in the church at 
Portsmouth, Virginia. The brethren appointed a 
committee, to wait upon him and try to gain him 



152 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

over to embrace the principles of the church; but 
he remained incorrigible. 

The church appointed another committee to go 
and try to silence him, but could not prevail. He 
said he had a meeting to attend the Wednesday 
night following; and he should preach. But the 
Lord interfered in behalf of his distressed church. 
For when Frost went to preach again, and took his 
text, which was, He shall thoroughly purge his 
floor, and gather his wheat into his garner; and 
coming to the words "purge his floor," his tongue 
failed, he cried, "let us pray," but sunk in his 
knees, and spoke not another word. He was dead 
in less than three hours. Thus did God avenge 
his suffering church in these towns, for this fox was 
spoiling the tender grapes. 

Elders BARROW and MINTZ. 
Some of the first Baptist ministers, who preached 
in the neighborhood of Shoulder's Hill, Virginia, 
were Elders Barrow and Mintz. They first began 
to preach at, and near to Sleepy Hole, on N arise- 
mond river. As the Lord had a work to do in this 
place, so the devil and his emissaries began to try 
to impede the work So it was when Paul and Si- 
las were at Philippi, and their labors were blessed. 
The devil stirred up the mob and the magistrates, 
to persecute and imprison the innocent Apostles, in 
order to stop the work, Acts, xvi. So it was on 
Nansemond river, witb Elders Barrow and Mintz; 
after preaching a few times, and their labors being 
blessed, (he devil influenced some wicked and un- 
godly men to persecute them. And at a certain 
meeting when they were going tapreach, these im- 
pious men went to the meeting and dragged Elders 
Barrow and Mintz from the place where they were 
Standing to preach, down to the water, not far dis- 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 153 

tant from the place of worship, in order they said, 
"as they loved dipping, to give them enough of it." 
And carried them down into the water and plunged 
them into it. Elder Barrow said they almost 
drowned him. They dipped him two or three 
times, and held him under water nearly one minute 
at a time, and when they raised him up, would ask 
him "If he believed?" He at last replied, "I be- 
lieve you will drown me." They at last desisted 
and let them go. Afterwards these two innocent 
sufferers never sought any recompence, but submit- 
ted to it, as persecution for Christ's sake. 
Elder JEREMIAH WALKER. 
It may be observed that the dissenters in Virgin- 
ia, before the revolution, were persecuted more 
than they ever were in North Carolina. In the 
county of Chesterfield several Baptist ministers 
were imprisoned for preaching in that county; and 
the people were so desirous to hear preaching that 
they would attend at the prison, and the ministers 
would preach to them through the grates of the pri- 
son. And in order to prevent their hearing, Colo- 
nel Cary had a brick wall erected 10 or 12 feet 
high before the prison, and the top thereof fixed 
with glass bottles set in mortar, to prevent the pep- 
ple from sitting on the top of the wall to hear the 
word. But if persecutors did but know it, they 
take a wrong step to prevent the progress of reli- 
gion by persecution: For persecution always whets 
the edge of devotion. Col. Cary and others in 
Chesterfield argued that the act of toleration, in 
the statute of William and Mary, did not extend 
to the colony of Virginia. But Elder Jeremiah 
Walker, a Baptist minister, was imprisoned for 
preaching in that county, and he was permitted to 
plead in his own defence; and after he had pleaded 
14 



154 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

his own cause, and explained the act of toleration 
before the court in Chesterfield, they allowed his 
arguments were conclusive; and so discharged the 
prisoners. 

But blessed be God, all scruples now are remov- 
ed by the glorious revolution, which gives ati un- 
der its auspicious government, equal and impartial 
liberty. 

Elder ELIJAH BAKER. 

Elder Elijah Baker suffered great perse- 
cution in his first attempts to spread the gospel in 
the lower parts of Virginia. He was once seized 
by a giddy set of ruffians, where he was preaching, 
who took him by violence, and carried him on 
board of a vessel, informing tbe captain, he "was 
a disturber of the peace" and wished him to make 
him work for his passage over the seas, and leave 
him in some of the European countries, as an exile. 
It was on Saturday night he was carried on board; 
and was put to work, and continued till late at 
night. Next morning he came before the captain, 
and begged liberty, as it was the Lord's day, to go 
to prayer amongst the people on deck. He was 
gratified; and he exhorted and prayed, and the 
Captain beard him. He thought Elder Baker a 
good matr, and was determined not to humor the 
spiteful mob; but ordered his people to put him on 
shore, in the mean while his friends, had dispatch* 
ed a messenger to the Governor, stating facts, in 
order to prevent Elder Baker's banishment. But 
when the messenger returned with the Governor's 
orders to the captain to release Baker; behold it 
was done. He was often threatened to be mob- 
bed; and sometimes apples thrown at him while 
preaching; but out of it all, the Lord delivered 
hini; and by hir labors a glorious work of God 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 155 

was begun, and carried an, on the Eastern shore of 
Virginia, 

Colonel NA THAN BR YAN. 

We shall close this treatise with some biograph- 
ical sketches of Colonel Nathan Bryan, who was 
formerly a member of the Kehukee Association, 
Until the division took place between the Kehukee 
and Neuse Associations, and then of course, on ac- 
count of his local situation, he became a member 
of the Neuse Association. 

Colonel Nathan Bryan, of Jones county, and 
state of North Carolina, was a very useful man 
both in church and state. And although the 
scriptures have abundantly testified that the^oor 
receive the gospel, and that God hath chosen the 
poor of this world, rich in faith; and that not many 
wise men after the flesh, not many mighty, not ma* 
ny noble, are called, he, (Matt. xi. 5. James- ii* 
5. 1 Cor. fc 26.) yet the scripture does not say § 
not any of such characters, but not many. To an- 
swer his divine purposes he calls some of all ranks 
to be witnesses of his grace, and to advance his glo- 
ry among men. Col. Bryan was a man of reputa- 
tion. He was possessed of an independent fortune, 
was a person of considerable talents, and in great 
esteem amongst men of the first character in this 
country: yet it pleased the Lord to bring him, to 
an experience of his grace through faith in Christ 
Jesus, and that at an early period of his life. He 
was baptized at 18 ^ears of age, and became a 
member of the Southwest of Neuse, under the care 
of Elder M'Daniel, succeeded by Elder Dillahun- 
ty. Being a promising youth, he was called upon 
to represent the county in the General Assembly. 
He served them in that capacity for a number of 
years, and although he was usually opposed, yet 
he always obtained his election when he offered as 



iod HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

a candidate. Notwithstanding he was a man of 
abilities, and worthy to fill posts of honor and 
profit in the state, yet it is well known to his con- 
stituents that he sought no lucrative office; but 
from that patriotic spirit which he was possessed, 
ihe good of his country was his general aim. His 
public and private life was so regular, and agreea- 
ble to a christian character, that he clearly mani- 
fested to all his acquaintance the sincerity of his 
heart, in that profession he had made of Christ Je- 
sus the Lord. His countenance was grave, yet 
commanding; and he was very affable in his ad- 
dresses, and inferior to none of his age and learn- 
ing. He was very careful to contribute to the re- 
lief of the poor saiuts, and ministers of the gospel* 
lie was careful to fill his seat at the house of God 
on conference days, and other days of preaching. 
In the year 1791, at the house of God, he said, 
"Brethren, what lies before U9 to-day? I see no- 
thing but good. We are all at peace and in love 
with each other. This is joy to me. Brethren, 
be strong in the Lord. The days may come when 
we shall desire to see one of - these days, and shall 
not see it. Brethren, in my childhood in the gos- 
pel, I often feared and doubted my saving interest 
in Christ, but in so doing it was no honor to my 
Lord; but through the goodness of God I have 
been kept from the base pollutions of the world, 
and I have no reason to doubt, for I know I shall 
stand in my lot." 

He was a man of so much philanthropy that he 
wished well to all, and strove for peace amongst re- 
ligious professors of every denomination, and a- 
mongst all men. From his respectability, and the 
great desire of the people, he was elected a mem- 
ber to represent the district of Newbern in the Con- 
gress of the United States, in the year of 1794, by 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 157 

a majority of 1200. In 1796, he was re-elected 
for the same district. But his promotion to honor 
did not make him look with contempt on a poor 
brother; or ever divert his mind from religion and 
the fear of the Lord; but true piety and holiness 
were his aim, by which he distinguished himself to 
be a servant of the meek and lowly Jesus. 

In the year 1796, from Congress, he wrote to 
Elder Koonce on Trent, in Jones county, as fol- 
lows, viz: 

Philadelphia,) Saturday night, 10 o'clock, Jfiril 9, 1796, 
Dear Brother Koonce, 

Altho' at the distance of five hundred miles, my mind 
is often with yon, thinking of my religious brethren on 
Trent and sympathising with you. I expect you and 
the rest of the brethren with you feel weak under the 
loss of your pastor, but you are set as a watchman in 
Israel; you are to support the weak, and say unto Zi- 
on, "thy God reigneth." I expect there are many 
sons of God in our church. I call it our church, for I 
must say of it as David did of Goliah's sword, "there is. 
none like it," with me. And whatever part of the globe 
I may be in, or whatever station I may be in, my. right 
hand would much sooner forget her cunning, than X 
could forget my brethren who are with you, or cease to 
pray for you, and the prosperity of Jerusalem. Fare- 
well in the Lord. NATHAN BRYAN. 

In the year 1797, before he went to Congress 
the last session, he said to his children, "I have no 
expectation of surviving this year — for none of 
my family ever survived fifty years." He went 
to Congress, where he served the public until the 
year 1798, and the same year he died in the fif- 
tieth year of his age — and was buried in the Bap-< 
list meeting house yard in Philadelphia* His fu- 
neral sermon was preached by Elder Ustrick, 
And although this great good man of God is gone 
to receive his crown of life, yet he speaketh by bia 
past pious life and undoubted character^ which will 
14* 



158 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

render his memory dear to thousands, and reflect 
immortal honors on his name. 

Finally to conclude. We have great reason to 
praise the Lord for his goodness and wonderful 
works to the children of men. About 90 years 
have rolled round since the first Baptist Associa- 
tion was established in America, which was in the 
city of Philadelphia; and now at this time there 
are between 40 and 50 Associations in the United 
States. About 1200 churches, and nearly one 
hundred thousand members. 

The Baptists in N. Carolina as well as the rest 
of their brethren in the United States, hold it their 
duty to obey magistrates, to be subject to the law 
of the land, to pay their taxes, to pray for all in au- 
thority. They hold with lawful oaths, and are 
willing when required to take an oath of God upon 
them to testify the truth before a court or magis- 
trate, but reject profane swearing. Their reli- 
gion allows them to bear arms in defence of their 
life, liberty and property. This society have man- 
ifested themselves to be true friends to civil liberty 
ever since the commencement of the- war; and gen- 
erally speaking, in their politics, they are strict re- 
publicans. 

We shall, by way of conclusion, add a sentence 
from Gen. Washington's answer to the address of the 
Baptist committee of Virginia, in the year 1789: 

"When I recollect with satisfaction, that the reli- 
gious society of which you are members, have been 
throughout America, uniformly, and almost unanimous- 
ly, the firm friends to civil liberty, and the persevering 
promoters of our glorious revolution, I cannot hesitate 
to believe that they will be the faithful supporters of a 
free yet efficient general government. Under this 
pleasing expectation, I rejoice to assure them, that 
they may rely on my best wishes and endeavors to a<fc 
Vance their prosperity." 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 159 



PA$V Ilo 



CHAP. I. 

1 . Proceedings of the Association at Conoho, in 

1803. 2. Sketch of the proceedings relating to 
the Missionary and ether inventions of the day. 
3. Proceedings at Parker's meeting house, in 

1 804. 4. At Daniel's meeting house, in 1805— 
Division of the Association, 5. At Skewarkey, 
in 1806. 

Friday, before the first Sunday in October, 
1803, the Association convened agreeably to ap- 
pointment at Conoho, Log Chapel, Martin county. 
The introductor} 7 sermon was delivered by Elder 
John Wall, from Isaiah, lxii. 12: "And they shall 
call them, the holy people, the redeemed of the 
Lord: and thou shalt be called, sought out, a city 
not forsaken." 

The Association was opened with prayer by El- 
der Martin Ross, and appointed Elder Jesse Read 
Moderator, and Elder Lemuel Burkitt Clerk, who 
called to his assistance brother James B. Jordan. 

Letters from 27 churches were read, from which 
it appeared, there had been baptized since last As- 
sociation 628, aiid that there were then in fellow- 
ship in the churches 2855. 

Brethren in the ministry from sister Associations 
were invited to seats, when Elders Brame, Poin- 
dexter, Sorey, Buntin, Barnes, and Bennett, seat- 
ed themselves. 

A letter from the Virginia Portsmouth Associa- 



160 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

lion by Elders Brown and Murrell, and one from 
the Neuse, by Elders Thompson and Oliver, were 
handed in and read. 

Letters from newly constituted churches at Cross 
Roads, Edgecombe county, Little Conetoe, in said 
county, and Conaritsey, in Bertie county, were re- 
ceived; praying admittance as members of tkis As- 
sociation, and, upon satisfactory information ihey 
were received; and the same manifested in the usu- 
al manner. 

A letter from the Flat River Association was 
handed in and read. 

Elders Read, Poindexter and Burkitt, were ap- 
pointed a committee to examine the circular letter^ 
brethren Turner and Cotton, on finance; Elder 
Wall to write to the Virginia Portsmouth, and El*- 
der Harrell to the Neuse Association. 

Elders Brown, Ross and Poindexter were ap- 
pointed to preach on Sunday- 
Saturday, the Association was opened with pray* 
$r by Elder Brown. 

The committees appointed on Friday, reported 
and the Association concurred therewith. 

Sunday, Elder Ross preached from Isaiah, Ixvi. 
11, 12: "That ye may suck, and be satisfied with 
the breasts of her consolations; that ye may milk 
out, and be delighted with the abundance of hec 
glory. For thus saith the Lord, behold, I will ex- 
tend peace to her like a river, and the glory of the 
gentiles like a flowing stream: then shall ye suck, 
ye shall be borne upon her sides, and be dandled 
upon her knees." Elder Poindexter preached 
from Ephesians, iii. 19: "And to know the love of 
Christ, which passeth knowledge^ that ye might be 
filled with all the fulness of God." Elder Brown 
preached from Exodus, xv. %1 1 "Apd they cause to 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, 16.1 

Elim, where were twelve wells of water, and three 
score and ten palm trees: and they encamped there, 
by the waters." • 

Monda} 7 , the Association was opened with pray- 
er, by Elder Brown. 

The circular letter was read and ordered to be 
attached to the minutes. 

Elders Read and Ross, were appointed messen- 
gers to theNeuse, and Elders Burkitt and Spivey, 
to the Virginia Portsmouth Association. 

The next Association was appointed to be held 
at Parker's meeting house, Hertford county, to 
commence Friday, before the first Sunday m Octo- 
ber, 1804, and continue four days. 

Elder Luke Ward was appointed to deliver the 
introductory sermon, and in case of his failure, El- 
der Philemon Bennett. 

Elder Joseph Biggs was appointed to prepare 
the circular letter. 

This Association was informed of a certain per- 
son travelling under the character of a Baptist min- 
ister, sometimes called Haines, (otherwise Holmes) 
and they warned the churches to guard against 
him as an impostor. 

Minutes of the Virginia Portsmouth, Neuse, Flat 
River, Middle District, Dover, Roanoke District, 
New York and Kentucky Associations, were re- 
ceived. 

The Association authorised the insertion in their 
minutes of this year, the following paragraph taken 
from the minutes of the Philadelphia Association 
of 1801: 

"Ninety-four years have roiled on since the first meet- 
ing of this Association (the first in America) and then 
composed of only five churches; but viewing the state of 
the churches at present, our connexions in this country, 
we perceive, it to be ai least at this time as the thousands 



162 HISTORY of the KBHUKEE 

of Israel, embracing numerous Associations, composed 
of at least (at this time) 1200 churches,, including more 
than one hundred thousand members.'* 

Query I. Is not the Kehukee Association, with all 
her numerous and respectable friends, called on in 
Providence: in some way to step forward in support 
of that Missionary spirit which the great God is so 
wonderfully reviving amongst the different denomi- 
nations of good men in various parts of the world? 

The subject was referred to next Association— - 
coming up for consideration at the Association in 
1804, it was answered by appointing Elders Lem- 
uel Barkitt, Martin Ross, Aaron Spivey, Jesse 
Read and John M'Cabe, delegates to meet such a& 
might be appointed by the Virginia Portsmouth 
and Neuse Associations at Cashie meeting house, 
Bertie county, on Friday before the third Suuday 
in June, 1805, to devise ways and means to support 
the missionary cause. The proceedings of this 
convention were never reported to this Association, 
so as to be spread upon her minutes; but arrange- 
ments were made to enter into a system of collect- 
ing money to aid missionary purposes. This spi* 
rit first originated in a desire not to be outstripped 
in appearances of religious zeal by other denomi- 
nations, and the advocates were much like the 
Jews of old, who prayed Samuel the prophet to an- 
oint them a king that they might be like other na- 
tions around them. Instead of following the "good 
old way," they sought out new inventions and the 
result proved mortifying and taught the salutary 
lesson that error will ultimately terminate in anar- 
chy and confusion. It was well calculated to, as it 
did, produce confusion in the churches; for being 
clothed with the sanctity of religion and consider- 
ing those opposed to its general diffusion as luke* 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 163 

warm in a good work, or enemies of truth, many 
good men embraced the scheme^ being seduced by 
its outward and, to them, beautiful appearance, 
without scrutinizing and testing the same by the 
sacred scriptures. But this Association were not 
without her Samuels, for as the Jews were told that 
the king they wished would prove a curse to them, 
so the churches were warned that this new invention 
would prove detrimental to their peace and happi- 
ness; but the zeal of the advocates of the new sys- 
tem was not relaxed, and extensive measures were 
introduced to collect large sums of money by a- 
gents travelling through the country, and which 
were expended in paying those very agents for their 
services. In a short time many were seen fostered 
by this system, whose only desire was to procure 
the "loaves and fishes," and as a necessary conse- 
quence propagated erroneous doctrines, such only 
as would suit the carnal and secure to the preacher 
a pocket full of cash. "Filthy lucre" appeared to 
be the main spring of their actions. Many of the 
pious followers of the Lamb were grieved, and ma- 
ny it is feared caught in the snare. But they were 
not suffered to continue long, before they were vis- 
ited with a rebuke and that by the old Kebukee Asso- 
ciation, At her Association in 1827, she took a de- 
cided stand against the new inventions of the day, 
which was more fully explained and stated in 1829; 
this proved a firebrand in the ranks of the new 
schemed advocates. Much hissing, retort and re- 
crimination was the necessary consequence. The 
KVhukee Association was anathematised as ene- 
mies of truth, opposers of good works, and stirrers 
up of discord. In the Chowan and Neuse Associ- 
ations, the missionary spirit procuring the ascen- 
dancy, evinced itself in refusing correspondence 



164 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

with the Kehukee, which had been uninterrupted 
ever since their dismission. But the Kehukee still 
remained steadfast, and she soon had the satisfac- 
tion to hear that she was not alone; that the Lord 
possessed kindred spirits in different parts of the 
world, and although they are few and contending 
against a large concourse, yet they have the con- 
solation to know that a promise is reserved foi° 
them; and though the flock is small, which has 
been the case ever since our Saviour was on the 
earth, yet they have never been forsaken. Much 
scurrility and abuse have been heaped upon the 
Kehukee Association by those too professing to be 
christians, yet she is able to bear the reproach of 
men for Christ's sake. She counts all things as 
bubbles, compared with that invariable rule of 
practice prescribed by ihe scriptures of eternal 
truth; and when the inventions of men conflict with 
that standard, she will always be found contending 
against them, girded with the shield and buckler of 
God's word. It is not then expecting too much 
when we congratulate ourselves that in a short 
time these sources of discord, this strife-stirring 
spirit will be consigned to oblivion by the refulgent 
beams of Christ's glorious gospel; and those fol- 
lowers of the Lamb, who have been separated by 
the enemy of truth for a season, will be seen uniting 
in that christian love and fellowship which charac- 
terised them before the new inventions of the day 
beguiled many from the path of duty. W^ cannot 
close our eyes to the fact, and as faithful historians 
we hand it to posterity, that much dissention pre- 
vails in the adjoining Associations and confusion 
appears to be the order of the day, while with us $ 
since the missionaries have been excluded from thf 
camp, peace and harmony prevails, 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 165 

Query 2. Are professors of religion, tvkose chiU 
dren live with them as members of their families , 
justifiable in allowing or even suffering them to go to 
dances, or associating with those who delight in that 
evil practice and its concomitants? 

Answer. Let parents under such circumstances 
eot forget the case of old Eli, I Samuel — nor the 
express word of God elsewhere, that children should 
be trained up in the way they should go, and 
brought up in the admonition of the Lord; for we 
think it inconsistent with their religious profession 
to indulge their children in that which they cannot 
allow themselves to participate. [Queries the same 
in substance with the above were presented in 1807 
and 1819, and answered the same with but little 
variation.] 

Query 3. Is it right for a -church in this Associa- 
tion to hold in fellowship a member who openly 
avows the Arminian tenets, or that such person 
should be appointed a delegate to the Association to 
represent the church in its deliberations? 

Answer. We suppose it is not right to hold such 
person in fellowship, and therefore of course would 
be improper to appoint him a delegate to the Asso- 
ciation? 

Query 4. Ts it right for a church in our connex- 
ion repeatedly to send her letters to this Association, 
without representing herself by delegates? 

Answer. It is not regular. 

Query 5- Is it expedient for a number of member^ 
to be constituted as a church by one minister only? 

Answer. We think it is not expedient. 

1804. Agreeably to appointment the Association^ 
met at Parker's meeting house, Hertford county, on 
Friday before the first Sunday in October, 1S04. 

The introductory sermon was delivered bv Elder 
15 



MQ HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

Philemon Bennett, from .Zechariah, iv. 9: "The 
hands of Zevubbabel have laid the foundations of 
this house; his hands shall also finish it; and thou 
shall know that the Lord of hosts hath sent me un- 
to you." 

The Association was opened with prayer by El- 
der Spivey, and appointed brother Nathan Mayo 
Moderator and Elder Lemuel Burkitt Clerk, who 
called to his assistance Elder Moses Bennett. 

The Rules of Decorum of the Association were 
read. 

Letters from 31 churches were read, from which 
it appeared there had been baptized since last As- 
sociation 554, and that there were now in fellow* 
ship 3255. 

A letter of correspondence from the Virginia 
Portsmouth Association, by their messengers,EIders 
Brown and Wright — one from the Neuse, by their 
messengers, Elders Barnes and Winstead— and one 
from the Georgia Association, were handed in and 
read. 

Letters from newly constituted churches atTran* 
ter's Creek, Beaufort county.; Smithwick's Creek, 
Martin county; Swift Creek, Edgecombe county; 
Prospect, Edgecombe county; Mearn's Chapel, 
Nash county; and Sappony, Nash county, were re- 
ceived, praying admittance as members of this As- 
sociation, and upon satisfactory information they 
were received. 

A church at Poplar Spring, Franklin county, 
was received, as a member upon a letter of dismis- 
sion from the Neuse Association. 

The fallowing committees were appointed, viz; 
Brethren Battle and Outlaw, on finance; Elders 
Read, Brown and Spivey, to examine the circular 
ieuer; Elder Lancaster, to write to the Virginia 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 167 

Portsmouth; Elders Poindexter and Spivey, to 
write to the Neuse; and Elder Joseph Biggs, to 
write to the Georgia Association. 

Saturday, the Association xvas opened with pray- 
er by Elder Ross. 

Elders Burkitt, Read, Harrell, Gilbert and Spi- 
vey, were appointed a committee to examine into 
some difficulties, in the Kehukee church, and endea- 
vor to remove them, and report to next Association. 

Elders Lancaster, Brown and Ross, were ap- 
pointed to preach on Sunday. 

Elder Ross was appointed to deliver an introduc- 
tory sermon to the convention, to be held by this, 
the Virginia Portsmouth, and the Neuse Associa- 
tions, at Cashie meeting house, Bertie county, on 
Friday, before the third Sunday in June, 1805; to 
deliberate on missionary subjects, ami Elder John 
Ivi'Cabe, in case of his failure. 

Sunday, Elder Ross preached from Hab. iii. 2i 
fi O Lord, I have heard thy speech and was afraid: 

Lord, revive thy work, in the midst of the years, 
in the midst of the years make known; in wrath re- 
member mercy." Elder Brown preached from 
Psalm, cxlv. 2: "Every day will I bless thee; and 

1 will praise thy name for ever and ever." Elder 
Lancaster preached from St. John, iv. 44: u For 
Jesus himself testified that a prophet hath no honor 
in his own country." 

Monday, the Association was opened with pray- 
er by Elder Wright. 

A letter of correspondence to the Georgia Asso- 
ciation was read and approved. 

It was resolved, that the churches composing this 
Association be requested to signify in their letters 
to next Association, whether they would approve of 
a division in the same or not. 



168 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

The circular letter was read, approved and or*- 
dered to be attached to the minutes. 

Elder Brame presented the Association with 
minutes of the Dover, Culpepper, Roanoke Dis- 
trict, Goshen, and Ketockton Associations, which 
were thankfully received. 

Elder Burkitt was appointed a messenger, and 
to write to the Neuse Association; and Elders Wall 
and M'Cabe to the Virginia Portsmouth. 

The next Association was appointed to beheld 
at Daniel's meeting house, on Fishing creek, Hali- 
fax county, to commence on Friday before the first 
Sunday in October, 1S05. 

1805. According to appointment the Associa- 
tion met at Daniel's meeting house. 

Elder Lewis Whitfield (in the absence of those 
appointed) delivered the introductory sermon from 
Genesis, xxviii. 12: "And he dreamed, and behold, 
a ladder set upon the earth, and the top of it reach- 
ed to heaven: and behold, the angels of God as* 
cending and descending on it* 5 ' 

The Association was opened with prayer by El- 
der Lancaster, and appointed brother Nathan 
Mayo Moderator, and Elder Lemuel Burkitt Clerk, 
who called to his assistance brother Bennett Bar- 
row. 

A letter of correspondence from the Virginia 
Portsmouth, by their messenger Elder Murrell; 
and one from the Neuse Association, by their mes- 
senger Elder Whitfield, were handed in and readi 

Two churches in Bertie county, one at the Log 
meeting house, the other at Outlaw's chapel, peti- 
tioned for admittance as members of this Associa- 
tion, and were received. 

The Association adjourned for the day with pray- 
er by Elder Wall. 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 169 

Saturday, the Association was opened with pray- 
er by Elder Murrell. 

A church on Ahoskey, in Hertford county, peti- 
tioned for admittance as a member, and upon sat- 
isfactory information was received. 

The following committees were appointed, viz: 
brethren Battle and Outlaw, on finance; Elders 
Read and Ross, to examine the circular letter; bro- 
ther Battle to write to the Virginia Portsmouth, 
and brother Barrow to the Neuse Association. 

Letters from 39 churches were read, from which 
it appeared there had been baptized since last Asso- 
ciation, 432; then in fellowship, 3579. 

The committee appointed last year to enquire in- 
to the difficulties in the Kehukee church and the 
new meeting house on Fishing creek, reported, that 
the two, which had heretofore been considered con- 
solidated, were in truth separate constituted church- 
es, and the Association concurred with the report; 
whereupon the new meeting house, now called 
Lawrence's meeting house, prayed admission as a 
member of this Association, which was granted. 

The church heretofore known in the minutes by 
the name of Flatty Creek, by request was hereafter 
to be called Newbiggin. 

The subject of a division in this Association was 
deliberated at this session and it was finally conclu- 
ded, that the Roanoke river be the dividing line, 
with the privilege to the churches, to represent 
themselves in whichever Association they might 
prefer; the churches on the north side of said river 
(to compose an Association to be called the Cho- 
wan Association, as the river of that name divided 
them,) appointed a meeting to organize themselves, 
to be held at Newbiggin meeting house, Pasquo- 
tank county, on Friday before the third Sundavin 
15* 



170 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

May, 1806. The churches on the south side of" 
Roanoke, retained the name of the Kehukee Asso- 
ciation, as the Kehukee church, from which the 
name was originally derived, was situated on the 
south side, and they appointed their next meeting 
to take place atSkewarkey meeting house, Martin 
county, on Friday before the first Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1806. 

Elder Nathan Gilbert was appointed to deliver 
the introductory sermon, and in case of his failure, 
Elder Philemon Bennett. 

Elder Moses Bennett was requested to prepare 
the circular letter. 

It was agreed between the churches at that time 
represented in this Association, that after defraying 
the expenses of printing the minutes of that year, 
the surplus of the Association fund be equally di- 
vided between the two Associations, and that they 
correspond with each other yearly. 

Elders Read and Lawrence were appointed mes- 
sengers to the Association, to be held on the north 
side of Roanoke river. 

Upon this division of the Association, it left in 
the churches of the Kehukee Association 1589 
communicants. 

1806. October 3d. 1806, the Association met 
according to appointment at Skewarkey meeting 
bouse, Martin county. 

Elder Nathan Gilbert delivered the introductory 
sermon from St. John, xv. 1, 2: "I am the true 
vine, and my father is the husbandman. Every 
branch in me that beareth not fruit, he takeih away; 
and every branch that beareth fruit, he purgeth it,, 
that it may bring forth more fruit." 

The Association was opened with prayer by El- 
der Hooten, and appointed brother Nathan Mayo 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 171 

Moderator, and Elder Joseph Biggs Clerk, who 
called to his assistance brother Bennett Barrow. 

Brethren in the ministry from sister Associations 
were invited to seats, when Elders Burkitt and 
Barnes seated themselves. 

Elder Burkitt presented this Association with 25 
copies of the minutes of the Chowan Association. 

Letters from 19 churches were read, from which 
it appeared there had been baptized since last As- 
sociation, 79; then in fellowship, 1736. 

The following committees were appointed, viz: 
brethren Dempsey Battle and John H. Drake, on 
finance; brother Bennett Barrow to write to the 
Chowan, Elder Joseph Biggs to the Neuse, and 
brother Dempsey Battle to the Virginia Ports- 
mouth Association; Elders Barnes and Gilbert to 
examine the circular letter. 

The Association adjourned for the day with 
prayer by Elder Burkitt. 

Saturday, the Association was opened with pray- 
er by Elder Gilbert. 

Letters of correspondence to the Neuse and 
Chowan Associations were read and approved, and 
Elder Gilbert appointed a messenger to the former, 
and Elder Biggs to the latter. 

A letter to the Virginia Portsmouth Association 
was read and approved, and Elder Joshua Law- 
rence appointed messenger. 

The committee appointed to examine the circu- 
lar letter reported, that none had come to hand! 
and recommended that a miniature, or brief histo- 
ry of the Baptists, written by Elder Daniel Mer* 
rill of Maine, be substituted for a circular letter, 
subject to the necessary alterations; and the Asso- 
ciation concurred in the recommendation. 

Elder Gilbert was appointed to write a letter to 



172 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

the Cape Fear Association, and ' attach the signa- 
tures of the Moderator and Clerk, and Elder Tho- 
mas Ross was appointed messenger. 

Elder Joseph Biggs was appointed Treasurer of 
this Association. 

Elder Burkitt, former Treasurer, paid over to 
the present Treasurer the balance due from him. 

A letter of correspondence from the Chowan As- 
sociation, was received by the hands of Elder Spi- 
vey, who with Elder Burkitt were appointed the 
messengers. 

The next Association was to be held at Hay- 
wood's meeting house, in Franklin county, to com- 
mence on Friday before the first Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1807. 

Elder Thomas Ross was appointed to deliver the 
introductory sermon, and in case of his failure, El- 
der Joshua Lawrence. 

Elder Moses Bennett was requested to prepare 
the circular letter. 

Elder Lemuel Burkitt and Aaron Spivey were 
requested to preach on Sunday. 

It was resolved, that Eider Joseph Biggs distri- 
bute the minutes of the Association to the different 
churches in proportion to the contributions made 
by them to the Association fund. 

The Association then adjourned with prayer by 
Elder Spivey. 

Sunday, Elder Spivey preached from Deutero- 
nomy, xxxii. 5: "Their spot is not the spot of his 
children." Elder Burkitt preached from Ezekiel, 
i. 21: "When those went, these went; and when 
those stood, these stood; and when those were lift- 
ed up from the earth, the wheels were lifted up ov- 
er against them: for the spirit of the living creature 
was in the wheels." 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. ITS 

1807. On Friday before the first Sunday in Oc- 
tober, 1807, the Association met at Haywood's 
meeting house, in Franklin county. 

The introductory sermon was delivered byEld^r 
Joshua Lawrence, from Acts, ii. 37, 38, 39: "Now 
when they heard this, they w 7 ere pricked in their 
heart, and said unto Peter and to the rest of the A- 
postles, men and brethren, what shall we do? Then 
Peter said unto them, repent and be baptized every 
one of you in the name of Jesus Christ, for the re- 
mission of sins, and ye shall receive the gift of the 
Holy G4iost. For the promise is unto you, and to 
your children, and to all that are afar off, even as 
many as the Lord our God shall call." 

The Association was opened with prayer by Ei- 
der Philemon Bennett, and appointed brother Na- 
than Mayo, Moderator; and Elder Joseph Biggs 
Clerk, who called to his assistance Elder Moses 
Bennett. 

Brethren in the ministry from sister Associations 
were invited to seats, when Elders Thomas Gard- 
ner and John Thompson sealed themselves. 

Letters from 23 churches were read, which show r - 
ed that there bad been baptized the past year, 111; 
and then in fellowship therein, 1540. 

Elder Philemon Bennett was appointed to write 
to the Chowan Association, brother Nathan Mayo 
to the Neuse, Elder Moses Bennett to the Virginia 
Portsmouth; brethren Dempsey Battle and John 
Mooring the committee on finance, and Elders 
Read and Lancaster to examine the circular let- 
ter. 

The Association adjourned for the day with 
prayer by Elder Thomas Gardner. 

Saturday, the Association was opened with pray- 
er by Elder Thompson. 



174 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

Elder Roland Cook was invited and seated him- 
self with us; Elder Joseph Biggs was appointed a 
messenger to the Chowan, and Elder Amariah 
Biggs to the Neuse Association. 

The circular letter was read, and approved, and 
ordered to be attached to the minutes. 

It was resolved, that the Wednesday before the 
second Sunday in December, 1807, be observed 
by the churches of this body, as a day of general 
thanksgiving to God, for his mercies bestowed on 
the labors of the husbandman, this and the past 
seasons, and it was recommended to unite in so- 
lemn prayer for the prosperity of Zion. 

It was resolved, that the next Association be held 
at Cross Roads meeting house, in Edgecombe 
county, to commence on Saturday before the first 
Sunday in October, 1808. 

Elder Philemon Bennett was appointed to de- 
liver the introductory sermon, and in case of his 
failure, Elder Lancaster. 

Elder Moses Bennett was appointed a messen- 
ger to the Flat River Association. 

Elders Joseph Biggs and John Thompson* were 
requested to preach on Sunday. 

The Association adjourned with prayer by El- 
der Philemon Bennett. 

Sunday, Elder Thompson preached from St. 
John, vii. 37, 38: "In the last day, that great day 
of the feast, Jesus stood and cried, saying, if any 
man thirst, let him come unto me, and drink. He 
that believeth on me, as the scripture hath said, out 
of his belly shall flow rivers of living water." 

Elder Biggs preached from Solomon's Songs, 
vi. 10: "Who is she that looketh forth as the -mor- 
ning, fair as the moon, clear as the sun, and terri- 
bly as an army with banners?" 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 175 

Elder Purifoy preached from St. John, xviii. 
38: "What is truth?" 

Query 1 . Suppose a member of a church who is 
known to he in Jail fellowship in the church, and is 
under the necessity of removing from the church be- 
fore there is an opportunity of applying for a dis- 
mission, is the Pastor authorised to dismiss such 
member? 

Answer. No, except the power is delegated from 
the church so to do. 

Query 2. Is it right for the ministers or members 
of the Baptist denomination to publish meetings for 
preaching for such whose religious principles or 
practices they have no fellowship with? 

Answer, No. 



CHAP. II. 

I. Proceedings of the Association at Cross Roadz 9 
in 1808— Biography of Elder James JU'Cabe. 
2. Proceedings at Morattock, in 1809— Biogra- 
phy of Elder Nathan Gilbert. 3. Proceedings 
at Kehukee, in 1810. 

The Association met at Cross Roads, agreeably 
to appointment, on Saturday before the first Sun- 
day in October, 1808. 

The introductory sermon was delivered by Elder 
Philemon Bennett from Isaiah, xlii. 10: "Sing un- 
to the Lord a new song, and his praise from the 
;ends of the earth, ye that go down to the sea, and 
all that is therein; the isles, and the inhabitants 
.thereof." 

The Association was opened with prayer by El- 
( <Jer Read, and appointed brother Nathan Mayo 



176 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

Moderator, and Elder Joseph Biggs Clerk, win* 
called to his assistance brother Bennett Barrow. 

Brethren in the ministry from sister Associations 
were invited to seats, when Elders Richard Pom- 
dexter and Zadock W. Baker, seated themselves. 

Letters from 27 churches were read, and from 
them it appeared there had been baptized the past 
year 116, and then in fellowship 1686. 

Elder Jonathan Cherry and brother Bennett Bar- 
row were appointed to write to the Chowan, Elder 
Joseph Biggs and brother Nathan Stancill to the 
Neuse, brethren Dempsey Battle and Jesse Little 
to the Virginia Portsmouth Association; brethren 
Michael Collins and Thomas Turner, the commit- 
tee on finance; and Elders Read and Lancaster, to 
examine the circular letter. 

A letter from the Neuse Association, by Elder 
Dupree their messenger; one from the Chowan, by 
Elder Spivey their messenger; and one from the 
Vriginia Portsmouth Association^ by EJder Buntiu 
their messenger, were received. 

A church in Hyde county, on the south side of 
Mattamuskeet Lake, petitioned for admission as a 
member of this Association and was received. 

Elders Spivey, Buntin and Lancaster, were re- 
quested to preach on Sunday. 

Sunday, Elder Buntin preached from St. Mat- 
thew, xxi. 5: "Tell ye the daughter of Sion, be- 
hold, thy King cometh unto thee, meek, and sitting 
upon an ass, and a colt the foal of an ass." Elder 
Spivey preached from Hebrews, iv. 12: "For the 
word of God is quick, and powerful, and sharper 
than any two-edged sword, piercing even to the di- 
viding asunder of soul and spirit, and of the joints 
and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts 
and intents of the Jieart." Elder Lancaster prea? 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 177 

ched from St. John, xvii. 3: "And this is life eter- 
nal, that they might know thee the Only true God, 
and Jesus Christ whom thou hast sent." Elder 
Poindexter concluded with prayer. 

Monday, the Association was opened with pray- 
er by Elder Spivey. 

Elder Luke Ward was appointed messenger to 
the Neuse; Elder Lancaster, to the Chowan; and 
Elder Read to the Virginia Portsmouth Association. 

The next Association was appointed to be held at 
Morattock meeting house, Washington county, to 
commence on Saturday before the first Sunday in 
October, 1809. 

Elder Moses Bennett was appointed to deliver 
the introductory sermon, and in case of his failure, 
Elder Lancaster. ♦ 

Elder Philemon Bennett was appointed to write 
the next circular letter. 

Elder JAMES M'CABE, 
Was born in the State of Maryland, as we are 
informed. He removed to North Carolina, JBeau- 
fort county, sometime during the revolutionary 
war. He attached himself to the Baptist church 
of -the free will order, and became a minister of 
that denomination about the year 1776. Some 
time afterwards -he left the free wills and became a 
member and minister of the United Baptist Society 
at the church at Pungo, now North Creek, after 
which he was called by said church to officiate as 
pastor, which he accepted. He continued pastor of 
that church until his death. His principles were 
orthodox and shone conspicuously in his public ad- 
ministrations — free grace and practical divinity 
was the theme of his soul. He was a bright exam- 
ple of practical religion, hence he urged its propri« 
16 



im HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

ety and usefulness by cogent reasoning from the 
pulpit. His address was plain and easy, and to* 
wards the latter part of his life his zeal in his mas- 
ter's cause seemed much to increase. He travelled 
very extensively and preached the gospel with 
great satisfaction to those who were favored with 
his visits. In the autumn of 1807, on a circuit of 
preaching, he was taken ill and died at Newbern 
resigned to the will of God, with evidences of his 
interest in Jesus bright and satisfactory. "The 
wicked is driven away in his wickedness, but the 
righteous hath hope in his death." 

1809. The Association met at Morattock meet* 
ing house, agreeably to appointment. 

Elder Joshua Lawrence preached the introduc- 
tory sermon from Genesis, vi. 20: "Of fowls after 
their kind, and of cattle after their kind, of every 
creeping thing of the earth after his kind: two of 
every sort, shall come unto thee to keep them alive." 

The delegates assembled and the business was 
opened with prayer by Elder Wall. 

Elder Philemon Bennett was chosen Moderator, 
and. Elder Joseph Biggs Clerk, who called to his 
assistance brother Dempsey Battle. 

Brethren in the ministry from sister Associations 
were invited to seats, when Elders Baker, Spivey 
and Morsely seated themselves. 

Letters from 26 churches were read, from which 
it appeared that there had been baptized the past 
year 49, then in fellowship 1661. 

Elder Joseph Biggs was appointed to Write to v 
the Chow?in^ Elder Amariah Biggs, to the Neu^e; 
and brother John H. Drake, to the Virginia Ports- 
mouth Association. Brethren Jesse Powell and 
Mathan Stancill, the committee on finance; Eiders 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 179 

Jpnathan Cherry and John Bowin, to examine thg 
circular letter. 

A letter from the Chowan Association, was re- 
ceived by their messengers, Elders Martin Ross and 
John Wall, accompanied with 35 copies of their min- 
utes. Also, a letter from the Virginia Portsmouth 
Associ&tion, by their messenger, Elder Murrell. 

A newly constituted church at Moore's meeting 
house, Nash county, was received as a member. of 
this Association. 

Elder Richard Poindexter, a special messenger^ 
from the Chowan Association, appeared and took 
his seat. 

Elders Benjamin Morsely, Robert Murrel! and 
Martin Ross, were requested to preach on Sunday. 

Sunday, Elder Murrell preached from St. Mat- 
thew, xii. 20: "A bruised reed shall he not break,, 
and smoking flax shall he not quench, till he sen* 
forth judgment unto victory." Elder Ross prea- 
ched from St. Matthew, v. 6: "Blessed are they 
which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for 
they shall be filled." Elder Morsely preached 
from Psalm, xiv. 7: "Oh that the salvation of Isra- 
cl were come out of Zion! When the Lord bring- 
eth back the captivity of his people, Jacob shall re- 
joice, and Israel shall be glad." 

Monday, the Association was opened with pray- 
er by Elder Ross. 
The Constitution and Rules of Decorum were read. 

Elders Joseph Biggs, Philemon Bennett, Wii- 

iiam Lancaster, Moses Bennett and Joshua Law- 

- rence were appointed a committee to revise the 

Constitution of this Association, and report to next 

session. 

The next Association was appointed to be held 
at Kehukee meeting house, Halifax county, to 



180 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

commence on Saturday before the first Sunday in 
October, 1810. 

Elder William Lancaster was requested to deli- 
ver the introductory sermon, and in case of his fail- 
ure, Elder Moses Bennett. 

Elders Amariah Biggs and Benjamin Joyner, 
were appointed messengers to the Neuse; Elders 
Philemon Bennett and William Lancaster, to the 
Chowan; and Elders Joshua Lawrence and Moses 
Bennett, to the Virginia Portsmouth Association. 

This Association acknowledged the presence of 
Elder Benjamin Morsely, of the South Carolina 
Association* 

It was made known to this, by the Chowan As- 
sociation, that a certain Jesse Hassell, formerly a 
member of the church at Yoppim, some time past 
procured an ordination by a presbytery to the ad- 
ministration of gospel ordinances improperly, and 
that he was walking disorderly, and had been ex- 
communicated from the church at Scuppernong, 
where he was a member, and that the Chowan As- 
sociation had pronounced the said ordination null 
and void: whereupon this Association resolved, 
that they view with satisfaction and highly approve 
of the steps taken by that Association in said case. 

It was then recommended to the churches and 
ministers: especially those ministers who form pres- 
byteries, not to lay hands suddenly on any man, 
authorising him to administer the gospel ordinances. 

An article in the minutes of the Chowan Associ- 
ation, recommending the establishment of a meet- 
ing to be called a meeting of general correspon- 
dence, to embrace all the Associations either in 
whole or in part, that have sprung from the Kehu- 
kee Association, was presented for consideration. 
The matter being entirely new, it was thought best 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 1SI 

to defer it, and accordingly it was postponed until 
oext Association. 

Elder Am?riah Biggs was appointed to prepare 
a circular letter for next Association. 

It was represented to this Association, that a cer- 
tain Ruel Windley, who had been lately excommu- 
nicated from the church at Pungo, or Nortli 
Creek, still continued to attempt to preach; it was 
therefore recommended to the churches to guard 
against said Windley as an impostor. 

The Association then adjourned with prayer. 

Query. Is it thought disorderly in a member of 
one of our churches to attend the preaching of such 
persons as may be excommunicated from other chur- 
ches of the same faith and order 6 } 

Answer. The Association give it as their opin- 
ion, that as it highly favors confusion it would be^ 
disorderly.. 

Elder NATHAN GILBERT, 
Was the son of Jesse Gilbert, (who was among 
the first Baptists in North Carolina,) and his only 
child, and was born in Anson county, on 30ih Jan- 
uary, 176S, and joined the Baptist church at an 
eftrly age. He commenced soon to preach the 
gospel to lost sinners. After residing some time 
in Anson, he became a citizen of Tyrre! county and 
a member of Scuppernong church. From thence 
he removed into Edgecombe county, sometime in 
the year 1793, and in July 1794, married a Miss- 
Ricks and settled in Nash county near the Falls of 
Tar River, and attached himself to that church 
where he supplied the place of pastor for some 
time, fti the year 1798, the church unanimously- 
requested him to take the pastoral charge of her,, 
which from some considerations he did not at that 
Jfi* 



182 HISTORY op the KEHDKEE 

time think proper to do. But in the year 1802, 
he accepted it; in which charge he remained until 
he finished his course. He was a man of remarka- 
ble strength of mind, being possessed of more than 
an ordinary portion of natural and acquired abili- 
ties. He was intimately acquainted with men and 
things. The subject that occupied most of his at- 
tention was the Holy Scriptures, which he studied 
with unwearied diligence, making them the rule of 
his faith and practice, consequently he was enabled 
to develop many hidden mysteries and make 
them plain to the weakest capacity: hence in his 
preaching he portrayed its beauties in such an en- 
gaging manner, that he seldom failed- to attract the 
attention of all who heard him. His address was 
affable and easy, his reasoning methodical and con-% 
vincing. He also possessed a happy method of ar- 
rangement in his discourses; his delivery was flow- 
ing, warm and pathetic. He was a man of excel- 
lent piety, which was discovered in every depart- 
ment of his life, particularly in the uniformity dis- 
played in the sanctity of his life and purity of his 
doctrine. Free grace was the delight of his soul. 
Impressed with a sense of its worth, he warmly de- 
clared and vindicated it. His usefulness in every 
relationship of his life may be best expressed by 
the silent regret which filled the breasts of so many 
of his acquaintances at his death as a neighbor, 
husband, friend and member of the Association. 
We are not in possession of many of his writings, 
but such as we have, display great penetration and 
]pve of true morality. Examine the circular let- 
ter written by him, to be seen in the first part of 
this History. His labors were indefatigable, al- 
ways abounding in the work of the Lord. We 
cannot tell how long he had been laboring in the 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 133 

vineyard of the Lord before he settled near the 
Falls of Tar River; afterwards, however, he stood 
as a warm defender of the truth for upwards of ten 
years. The sickness which terminated this memo- 
rable man's life, we are informed, was a nervous fe- 
ver, under which he labored for several weeks un- 
til it pleased God to take him from the evils of this 
world. He fell asleep in Christ the 1st day of Au- 
gust, 1808. We doubt not but that he is now reap- 
ing the joys of heavenly bliss* "Mark the perfect 
man and behold the upright, for the end of that 
man is peace." May his exemplary life and hap- 
py death encourage all who Ipve the Lord Jesus 
Christ. Amen. 

1810. The Association convened at Kebukee 
meeting house according to appointment, on Sat- 
urday before the first Sunday in October, 1810. 

Eider William Lancaster preached the introduc- 
tory sermon from Acts, ii. 42: "And they continu- 
ed steadfastly in the apostles' doctrine and fellow- 
ship, and in breaking of bread, and in prayers." 

The Association was opened with prayer by El- 
der Philemon Bennett; and appointed Elder Phile-r 
mon Bennett Moderator, and Elder Joseph Biggs 
Clerk, who called to his assistance Elder Moses 
Bennett. 

Brethren in the ministry from sister Associations 
were invited to seats, when Elders William Creath, 
Richard Dobbs, William Hatchett, Thomas Gard- 
ner, William Dossey, James Ross, John Purifoy, 
Thomas Ross, Thomas Dupree, and Hillary Mor- 
riss, seated themselves*. 

Letters from 28 churches were read, and it ap- 
peared therefrom that there had been baptized the 
past year 66, then in fellowship 1663, 



1S4 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

Elders Read and Lancaster were appointed to 
examine the circular letter; brethren Nathan Stan- 
cill and Jesse Powell, the committee on finance; 
brother John H. Drake, to write to the Virginia 
Portsmouth; Elder Moses Bennett, to the Neuse; 
brother Dempsey Battle, to the Raleigh; Elder 
Benjamin Joyner, to the Chowan; and Elders Lan- 
caster and Read to the Red River Associations. 

Eldevs Read and Lancaster were appointed to ex- 
amine the packet from Kentucky to this Association. 

Eiders Creath, Dossey, and Dobbs, were re- 
quested to preach on Sunday. 

The Association adjourned for the day with 
prayer by Elder Creath. 

Sunday, Elder Dossey preached from Acts, xi. 
20: "And some of them were men of Cyprus and 
Cyrene, which when they were come to Antioeh, 
spake unto the Grecians, preaching the Lord Je- 
sus." Elder Creath preached from St. Matthew, 
vi. 13: "And lead us not into temptation, but deli- 
ver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, and 
the power, and the glory, forever. Amen." El- 
der Dobbs preached from Genesis, vii. i: "And 
the Lord said unto Noah, come thou and all thy 
house into the ark: for thee have I seen righteous 
before me in this generation." 

Monday, the Association was opened with pray- 
er by Elder Amariah Biggs. 

Elder Jesse Holleman was invited to a seat* 

The Rules of Decorum of the Association were 
read. 

The committee appointed to examine the circu- 
lar letter reported, that they found it in an unfinish- 
ed state and recommended that another be written; 
whereupon Elder Jesse Read was appointed to 
write the same, to be inspected by Elders Philemon 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. IBS 

and Moses Bennett, and William Lancaster, and 
attached to the minutes. 

, The committee appointed to examine the packet 
from Kentucky reported, that it came from an indi- 
vidual and that the Association were not interested 
in it; whereupon the Association discharged the 
committee, and ordered the Treasurer to pay El- 
der Read one dollar postage paid by him on said 
package. 

Letters to the Red River, Raleigh, Neuse, Cho- 
wan, and Virginia .Portsmouth Associations, were 
jead, approved, and ordered to be forwarded. 

The next Association was appointed to take 
place at Mearn's Chapel, to commence on Satur- 
day before the first Sunday in October, 1811* 

Elder Amariah Biggs was appointed to deliver 
the introductory sermon, and in case of his failure 
Elder James Ewell. 

The subject of a meeting of general correspon- 
dence in North Carolina, was again presented to 
the Association through Elder Dossey, from the 
minutes of the Chowan Association; whereupon 
Elders Lancaster, Read, Philemon and Moses 
Bennett, were appointed messengers from this, to 
meet such as may be appointed by other Associa- 
tions, to assemble at the meeting house at the Falls 
of Tar River, on Friday before the second Sunday 
in June, 1811. 

The committee appointed at last Association to 
revise the Constitution reported, that those who 
compose said committee live so remotely from each 
other, that they had not found it convenient to meet 
and attend to the subject; whereupon the commit- 
tee were discharged, and Elders Read, Philemoo 
and .Moses Bennet, Lawrence, and Lancaster, were 
appointed in their place, to meet at Daniel's meet* 



IS6 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

ing house, on Friday before the second Sunday in 
April, 1811, for that purpose. 

The Association then adjourned with prayer by 
Elder Lancaster. 



CHAP. III. 

1. Proceedings of the Association at Mearn's Cha- 
pel, in 1811. 2. At Great Swamp, in 1812 — 
Biography of Colonel Nathan Mayo, 3. Pro- 
ceedings at Williams- s meeting house, in 1813. 
4. At Morattock, in 1814. 

The Association met at Mearn's Chapel, Nash 
county, Saturday before the first Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1811. 

The introductory sermon was preached by Elder 
Richard Dobbs, (the Elders appointed being ab- 
sent,) from Hebrews, ii. 3: "How shall we escape, 
if we neglect so great salvation/* 

The Association was opened with prayer by El- 
der Philemon Bennett, and appointed Elder^Phile- 
tnon Bennett Moderator, Elder Joseph Biggs 
Clerk, who called as assistant Elder Moses Ben- 
nett. * 

Letters from 28 churches were read, from which 
it appeared that there had been baptized since last 
Association 182, then in fellowship 1627. 

A church recently constituted at Spring Green, 
Martin county, was received as a member of this 
Association. 

Brethren in the ministry from sifter Associations 
were invited to seats, when Elder Robert Murreil 
seated himself. 

A letter from the Red River Association, Ken- 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 1S7 

ttfcky; one from the Chowan Association, by their 
messenger Elder Spivey, accompanied with 30 co- 
pies of their minutes; and one from the Virginia 
Portsmouth Association, accompanied with some 
minutes, were received and read, 

Elder Read delivered to the Association sundry 
copies of minutes of several Associations, left with 
him by Elder William Braime; also, 30 copies of 
the minutes of the General Convention of North 
Carolina Baptists. 

The Treasurer w&s ordered to pay Elder Phile- 
mon Bennett two dollars, advanced by him to de- 
fray the expenses of printing the minutes of the 
Convention held in June, 1811. 

Brethren Henry Clark and John H. Drake were 
appointed the committee on finance; Elders Read 
and Spivey, to examine the circular letter; brother 
Bennett Barrow, to write to the Red River Associ- 
ation, Kentucky; Elder William Lancaster, to the 
Chowan; Elder Benjamin Jpyner, to the Virginia 
Portsmouth; brother John H. Drake to the Ra- 
leigh; and brother Dempsey Battle to the Neuse 
Association. - Elders Read, Dobbs, and Murrell, 
to draft an answer to the query referred from last 
Association to this. 

Elders Dobbs, Spivey, and Robert T. Daniel, 
were requested to preach on Sunday. 

Sunday, Elder Daniel preached from St. Luke, 
xii. 32: "Fear not, little flock, for it is your father's 
good pleasure to give you the kingdom." Elder 
Spivey preached from Micah, iv. 1: "But in the 
last days it shall come to pass, that the mountain 
of the house of the Lord shall be established in the 
top of the mountains, and it shall be exalted above 
the hills; and people shall flow into it." Elder 
X>obbs preached fronj 1 Peter, v. 4 ; "Aad whes 



188 HISTORY of the KEHUKDE 

the chief shepherd shall appear, ye shall receive a 
crown of glory that fadeth not away." 

Monday, the Association was opened with pray- 
er by Elder Lancaster. 

A letter from the Neuse Association, by their me#- 
senger, Elder Dupree, was received, informing the 
Association that Elder Daniel was also a messenger. 

Letters to the Virginia Portsmouth, Chowan, 
Red River, and Raleigh Associations, were read 
and approved, and ordered to be forwarded. 

The next Association was to be held at Great 
Swamp meeting house, Pitt county, to commence 
on Saturday before the first Sunday in October, 
1812. 

Elder Joshua Lawrence was appointed to preach 
the introductory sermon, and in case of his failure, 
Elder Philemon Bennett. 

Elder Lancaster was to write the circular letter. 

Elder Lancaster was appointed a messenger to 
the Chowan; Elder Lawrence, to the Raleigh; El- 
der Luke Ward, to the Neuse; Elder Joyner, to the 
Virginia Portsmouth; and Elder Philemon Ben-* 
net, to the Meherrin Association. 

The Constitution of the general meeting of cor- 
respondence of North Carolina Baptists, which as- 
sembled at the Falls of Tar River in June, came 
under deliberation; but, after being discussed, was 
not adopted. 

The committee appointed to examine the circular 
letter reported, that they had received no such let- 
ter; whereupon Elder Read was appointed to write 
one, to be attached to the minutes. 

Elders Lawrence, Lancaster, Philemon and Mo- 
ses Bennett, were appointed delegates to the next 
general meeting of the Baptists in this State, to con-^ 
Vene in Raleigh in July, 1812,. 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 189 

1812. The Association convened at Grea-t 
Swamp meeting house, according to appointment, 
on Saturday before the first Sunday in Oct. 1812, 

The introductory sermon was delivered by El- 
der Philemon Bennett from 1 Corinthians, xv. 43: 
"It is sown in dishonor, it is raised in glory: it is 
sown in weakness, it is raised in power*' 5 

The Association being opened with praj'er by 
Elder Bennett, appointed Elder Philemon Bennett 
Moderator, and Elder Joseph Biggs Clerk, who 
called as assistant, Brother Bennett Barrow, 

Letters from 31 churches were read, from which 
it appeared that there had been baptized the past 
year 257, then in fellowship 1869. 

A church at Frying Pan, in Tyrrell county, pe- 
titioned for admission into this body and was re- 
ceived. 

A letter from the Chowan Association, with 21 
copies of their minutes of 1810 and 25 copies of 
1811, by their messenger, Elder Spivey; and one 
from the Neuse Association, with 25 copies of their 
minutes by their messenger, Elder John M'Cabe, 
were received. 

A certificate setting forth the appointment of El- 
der John Gully, as a delegate from the Raleigh 
Association, with 25 copies of their minutes, were 
received, but Elder Gully failed to attend. 

A letter from the Virginia Portsmouth Associa- 
tion, accompanied with 30 copies of their minutes, 
was received by the hands of Elder Robert Murrell. 

Twenty-five copies of the minutes of the Baptist 
general meeting of correspondence in North Caro- 
lina, were received. 

A letter from the Red River Association, Ken- 
tucky, was received through Elder Joseph Biggs, 
and read. 

17 



190 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

Brethren Michael Collins and John W. May© 
were appointed the committee on finance; Elders 
Read and Spivey, to examine the circular letier; 
brethren Bennett Barrow to write to the Red River; 
John W. Mayo, to the Chowan; Jesse Little, to the 
Neuse; and Frederick Philips, to the Virginia 
Portsmouth Associations, 

Elders Lancaster, Spivey, and Bjddle, were ap- 
pointed to preach on Sunday. 

Sunday, Elder Biddle preached from Romans, 
v. 21: "That as sin hath reigned unto death, evert 
so might grace reign through righteousness unto 
eternal life, by Jesus Christ our Lord." Elder 
Spivey preached from Solomon's Songs, i. 8: "If 
thou know not, oh thou fairest among women, go 
thy way forth by the footsteps of the flock, and 
feed thy kids beside the shepherds' tents." Elder 
Lancaster concluded by exhortation and prayer. 

Monday, the Association was opened with pray- 
er by Elder John Bowin. 

A letter to the Red River Association was read, 
approved, and ordered to be sent. 

A letter to the Chowan, and one to the Virginia 
Portsmouth Associations, were read and approved; 
and Elders Readand Philemon Bennett appointed 
messengers to the former, and Elder Benjamin Joy- 
Tier to the latter. 

The circular letter was read, and ordered to be 
attached to the minutes. 

Elder William Lancaster was appointed our mes« 
senger to the Raleigh Association, and to carry 
with him 25 copies of our minutes for 1811. 

It was resolved, that the 8th, 9th, and 12th ar- 
ticles of the Constitution of the general .meeting of 
correspondence be altered to read thus: "Article 
8th, That a fun$ to defray the expences of this bo- 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 191 

dy be raised by a voluntary contribution* Article 
9th. That the general meeting of correspondence 
may adopt measures to extend religious acquaint- 
ance, to encourage the preaching of the gospel, and 
to diffuse useful knowledge. Article I Oth. This 
body shall have an annual meeting, so as to bene- 
fit the several Associations of whom the general 
meeting may have beeh composed, but shall be con- 
sidered only as an advisary council. Article 12th. 
That when a majority of the Associations of which 
the general meeting may have been constituted, 
shall concur in such a wish, then this Constitution 
may be altered or this meeting dissolved. 35 

Elder Moses iiennett was requested to deliver an 
introductory sermon to next Association^ and in 
case of his failure, Elder Luke Ward. 

The nextx^ssociation was to be heW at Williams's 
meeting house, Edgecombe county, to commence 
on Saturday before the first Sunday in Oct. 1813. 

Eiders Lancaster, Read, Lawrence, and Phile- 
mon Bennett, were appointed delegates to the next 
general meeting of correspondence, to be held at 
the Falls of Tar River, on Saturday before the 
fourth Sunday in July, 1813; and the Association 
contributed three dollars to the fund of that meeting. 

The Association then adjourned with prayer by 
Elder Lancaster. 

Colonel NATHAN MAYO, 
Was born according to record on the 22d Sep- 
tember, 1742. Many of the occurrences of his 
life have not been handed down to us, but some are 
known from personal acquaintance. When the 
time arrived which "tried men's souls" in the revo- 
lutionary struggle, he took an active part in ecu- 
tending for tlfe rights of the colonies. He became 



192 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

an object of some solicitude to several of those favor- 
ing the oppressions of the day, and a plan was in 
agitation to remove him out of the way by putting 
an end to his existence. But he was apprised by 
some of his religious friends of the secret schemes 
of his enemies, and thereby their plans were frus- 
trated. He was often called on and readily obey- 
ed iu administering the laws of his State, and col- 
lecting its feeble defence against the enemies of his 
country. He judiciously served the people as a 
magistrate in the administration of justice, and af- 
terwards as the representative of his county in the 
General Assembly of the State. In a military ca- 
pacity he served as a captain, major, and comman- 
ding colonel of his county. He was not much or 
often out of his native county, in publicly defend- 
ing the rights of himself and his fellow men, but 
sufficient to prove with what alacrity he was will- 
ing to encounter danger for them. About the be- 
ginning of the revolutionary struggle he embraced 
religion, not from sinister views but from the hon- 
est dictates of his judgment, and attached himself 
to a Baptist church on Tosniot, Edgecombe coun- 
ty, which church then had a branch at Flat Swamp, 
Pitt county. That branch increasing somewhat, 
they petitioned the church for dismission to form a 
constitution, which was granted. He was one of. 
her constituent members. He took an active part 
in attending to her interests, w r as a very correct dis- 
ciplinarian, and was often called on to officiate as 
Moderator in the Kehukee Association. When 
the church at Cross Roads was constituted, he took 
a letter of dismission and became a member there, 
as it was more convenient to him. He served much 
in each church as deacon, and as long as his men- 
tal faculties were retained, the subject of religion 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 193 

was the burden of his song. Although he did not 
often from the pulpit or stage address his fellow 
men on the all important subject of a preparation 
for a future state, yet at times he would perform 
this disinterested act of love in a feeling manner. 
At last through age and infirmity he had to give 
over these public pursuits, and on the 14th day of 
March, 1811, he departed this life beloved by ma- 
ny and his death regretted by all his numerous re- 
latives and friends, and we doubt not has taken up 
his abode "where the wicked cease from troubling, 
and the weary are at rest." 

IS IS. The Association met at Williams's meet- 
ing house, on Saturday before the first Sunday ill- 
October, 1813, 

Elder Amariah Biggs delivered the introducto- 
ry sermon (the Elders appointed being absent) 
from Ecclesiastes, xii. 14: "For God shall bring 
every work into judgment, with every secret thing, 
whether it be good, or whether it be evil." 

The Association was opened with prayer by El- 
der Philemon Bennett, and chose Elder Philemon* 
Bennett Moderator, and Elder Joseph Biggs 
Clerk, who called to his assistance brother Beo^ 
neit Barrow. 

9 Letters from 29 churches were read, from which 
it appeared that there had been baptized since last 
Association 108, then in fellowship 1974. 

Brethren in the ministry from sifter Associations 
were invited to seats, when Elder Joshua Barnes 
seated himself. 

* A certificate of the Raleigh Association, with 31 
copies of their minutes, was received by the hands 
of Elder Wall, their messenger. 

A letter from the Chowan Association, with 25 
It* 



194 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

copies of their minutes, was received by Elder Spi- 
vey. 

Brethren Michael Collins and Willis Alston 
were appointed the committee on finance; Elders 
Read, Philemon Bennett and Joseph Biggs, to ex- 
amine the circular letter; brother Bennett Barrow, 
to write to the Red River; Elder Joyner,,,to the 
Chowan; Elder Lawrence, to the Neuse; and bro- 
ther Philips, to the Virginia Portsmouth Association. 

Elders Spivey, Barnes, and Ward, were appoin- 
ted to preach on Sunday. 

The Association then adjourned for the day with 
prayer by Elder Spivey. 

Sunday, Elder Barnes preached from Hebrews, 
x. 14: "For by one offering he hath perfected for- 
ever them that are sanctified." Elder Ward prea- 
ched from Romans, viii. 1: "There is therefore 
now no condemnation to them which are in Christ 
Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the 
spirit. 5 ' Elder Spivey preached from 1 Corinthi- 
ans, xiii. 13: "And now abideth faith, hope, chari- 
ty, these three, but the greatest of these is charity." 
Elder Poindexter also preached from Isaiah, Tiii. 
12: Therefore will I divide him a portion with the 
great, and he shall divide the spoil with the strong, 
because he hath poured out his soul unto death." 

Monday, the Association was opened with pray- 
er by Elder James Ewell. 

The Decorum of the Association was read. 

Letters to the Virginia Portsmouth, Red River, 
Kentucky, Chowan, and Neuse Associations, were 
read and approved, and Elders Read and Joyner 
appointed messengers to the Virginia Portsmouth; 
Elders P. Bennett and Amariah Biggs, to the Cho- 
wan; Elders P. Bennett and Joyner, to the Neuse.; 
and Elder P. Bennett, to the Raleigh Association, 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. I9si 

The committee appointed to examine the circu- 
lar letter reported, that none had come to hand and 
recommended the insertion of one in the minutes of 
the Georgia Association, with the necessary altera- 
tions. The Association concurred and appointed 
Elders Read, Bennett, and Laucaster, to make the 
alterations. 

The next Association was appointed- to be held at 
Morattock meeting house, Washington county, to 
commence on Saturday before the first Sunday in 
October, 1814. 

Elder Lawrence was appointed to deliver the in* 
troductory sermon, and in case of his failure, Elder 
Bennett. 

Brother Bennett Barrow was appointed to pre- 
pare the next circular letter. 

Elders P. Bennett, Lawrence, Read, and Ama- 
riah Biggs, were appointed delegates to the gene- 
ral meeting of correspondence, to be held at Union 
meeting house, Wake county, on Friday before 
the 4th Sunday in July, 1814, and the Association 
sent by the hands of Elder Read five dollars to the 
fund of that meeting. 

It w r as resolved at this Association, that the direct 
road leading from HilTs Ferry on Roanoke River 
to Tarborough on Tar River, be considered the 
middle of this Association, and that in future the 
Association shall be held one year above and the 
next below that road alternately; and that the 
churches in each part shall be entitled to the privi- 
lege of appointing where the Association shall be 
held within their bounds. 

The Association then adjourned with prayer by 
Elder Barnes. 

1814. The Association met at Qlorattock mee4- 



196 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

ing house, pursuant to appointment, on Saturday 
before the first Sunday in October, 1814. 

The Elders appointed being absent, Elder Jo- 
seph Biggs preached the introductory sermon from 
St. Luke, xii. 32: "Fear not, little flock, for it is 
your father's good pleasure to give you the king- 
dom." 

The Association was opened! with prayer by El- 
der Joseph Biggs, and from the excessive rain 
throughout the day but few delegates attended, 
and the Association was adjourned until the next 
day with prayer by Elder John Bowin. 

Sunday, Elders Philemon Bennett, Jesse Read, 
and Joshua Lawrence preached, and while Elder 
Lawrence was preaching the delegates assembled 
and the Association was opened with prayer by El- 
dec Philemon Bennett; and appointed Eider Phile- 
mon Bennett Moderator, and Elder Joseph Biggs 
Clerk, who called as assistant brother Bennett 
Barrow. 

Letters from 29 churches were read, whi^h 
showed the number baptized the past year to be 44y 
then in fellowship in the churches 1961. 

A letter from the IVeuse Association, with some 
minutes by their messenger Elder Dupree; and two 
letters from the Red River Association, for 1813 
and 1814, through Elder Biggs weve received. 

Brother John W. Mayo was appointed to writs 
to the Neuse; Elder Joseph Biggs, to the Red Ri* 
ver; brother Barrow, to the Virginia Portsmouth* 
and Elder Read to the Chowan Associations; El- 
ders Read, Biggs and Bennett, to examine the cir- 
cular letter; and brethren James Wiggins and Jes- 
se Powell, a committee on finance. 

Monday, the Association was opened with pray* 
er by Elder Dupree, 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 197 

Letters to the Chowan, Red River, Neuse, and 
Virginia Portsmouth Associations, were read and 
approved, and Elders Biggs and Ward appointed 
messengers to the Chowan; Elders Read and P. 
Bennett to the Neuse; Elder P. Bennett and bro- 
ther John Fowler, to the Raleigh; and Elders Joy- 
ner and Lawrence, to the Virginia Portsmouth. 

It was resolved, to send five dollars to the fund 
of the general meeting by Elder P. Bennett. 

The next Association was appointed to be held 
at Daniel's meeting house, Fishing Creek, Halifax 
county, to commence on Saturday before the first 
Sunday in October, 181&* 

Elder Joseph Biggs was appointed to deliver 
the introductory sermon, and in case of his failure, 
Elder Amariah Biggs. 

Brother Bennett Barrow was appointed to write 
the circular letter. 

Elders Read, Lancaster, P. Bennett, and broth- 
er Barrow, and in case of his failure, brother Eli- 
sha Battle, were appointed delegates to the next 
general meeting of correspondence. 

The last Thursday in November, 1815, was re- 
commended to the churches as a day to be observed 
in fasting* humiliation h prayer, to Almighty God* 



CHAP. IV. 

1. Proceedings of the Association at DanieVs meet- 
ing house, in 1S15. 2. At Log Chapel, in 1816 
— Biography of Elder John Bowin. 3. Pro- 
ceedings at the Falls of Tar River, in 1817, 
Agreeably to appointment the Association met 
at Daniel's meeting house, Fishing creek, on Satur- 
day before the first Sunday in October, 1815. 



199 HISTORY of the KEHUEBE 

The introductory sermon was preached by Elder 
Joseph Biggs from 1 Corinthians, xiv. 40: "Lei 
all things be done decently and in order/ 5 

The Association was opened with prayer by Eb- 
der P. Bennett, and appointed Elder Bennett Mod- 
erator, and Elder Biggs Clerk, who called to hfs 
assistance brother Barrow. 

Brethren in the ministry from sister Associations 
were invited to seats, when Elders Martin Ross 
and Benjamin Davis, seated themselves. 

Letters from 29 churches were read, from which 
it appeared there had been baptized therein during 
the past year 41, and then in fellowship 1921. 

A letter from the Chowan Association, with some 
copies of their minutes, by their messengers Elders 
Hervey and John Roe; one from the Neuse, witfc 
some copies of then* minutes; one from the Virgi- 
nia Portsmouth, and one from the Country Line As- 
sociation, by their messengers Elders Land res and 
Campbell, were received. 

A letter from the Red River Association was re- 
ceived through brother William Pope. 

Some copies of the minutes of the Raleigh Asso- 
ciation, were received by brother John Deuson 
their messenger. 

Brethren James Wiggins and Bennett Barrow 
were appointed the committee on finance; Elders 
Ross, Read, Spivey, and brother Barrow, to exam- 
ine the circular letter; brother Benjamin Blount, to 
write to the Neuse; Elder Joyner, to the Red Riv- 
er; Elder William Hyman, to the Chowan; Elder 
Lawrence, to the Virginia Portsmouth; Elder Ben- 
nett, to the Country Line; and brother Jesse Little, 
to the Flat River Associations. 

Elder Martin Ross presented to this Association 
31 copies of the Report of the Board at Philadel- 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 190 

phia of Baptist Foreign Missions, received through 
their agent Luther Rice. 

The committee appointed to examine the circular 
letter was requested to examine the Report, and re- 
port on Monday following. 

Elders, Ross, Spivey, and Lewis Whitfield, and 
in case of either's failure, Elder Roe ; were selected 
to preach on Sunday. 

The Association then adjourned with prayer by 
Elder Benjamin Davis. 

Sunday, Elder Ross being indisposed, Elder Roe 
preached frum Titus, ii. 14: "Who gave himself 
for us, that be might redeem us from all iniquity^ 
and purify unto himself a peculiar people, zealous 
of good works." Elder Spivey preached from 
Hebrews, iv. 12: "For the word of God is quick 
and powerful, and sharper than any two-edged 
sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder df 
.sou! and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, and 
<is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the 
heart." Elder Whitfield preached from Romans, 
viii. 16, 17: "The Spirit itself beareth witness with 
our spirit, that we are the children of God: and if 
children, then heirs: heirs of God, and joint-heirs 
with Christ; if so be that we suffer with him, that 
we may be also glorified together." 

Monday, the Association was opened wkh pray-* 
er by Elder Joyner. 

Letters to the Virginia Portsmouth, Red River, 
Chowan, and Flat River Associations, were read 
and approved, and Elders Bennett and Read ap- 
pointed messengers to the Flat River; Elder Read, 
to the Virginia Portsmouth; Elders J. Biggs and 
Bennett, to the Chowan; and Elder Joyner an($ 
brother John Fowler to the Raleigh Associations. 
The next Association was appointed to be held 



200 HISTORY of t«e KEHUKEE 

at Conoho Log Chapel, to commence on Saturday 
before the first Sunday in October, 1816. 

Elder William Lancaster was appointed to deli- 
ver the introductory sermon, and in case of his 
failure, Elder Moses Bennett; Elder Benjamin 
Joyner, to write the circular letter. 

A letter to the Red River Association was pla- 
ced in the hands of brother William Pope, of that 
Association, for conveyance. 

The circular letter was read and ordered to be at- 
tached to the minutes. 

The committee appointed on Saturday to exam- 
ine the Report of the Board at Philadelphia on 
Foreign Missions, recommended that the circular of 
the agent, Elder Rice, be read; which was done. 

Brother Bennett Barrow was then appointed 
corresponding secretary of this Association until 
next annual meeting, to write to said agent, receive 
payment for the pamphlets, forward and transmit 
the same to the Board or agent. 

It was represented to this Association, that some 
alterations were necessary to be made in the Con- 
stitution of the general meeting of correspondence; 
whereupon it was resolved, that the delegates from 
this Association be authorised to assist in making 
any alterations tho't necessary in said instrument. 

Elders Read, P. Bennett, Lancaster, andbroth- 
er Barrow, and in case of either's failure, Elder 
Moses Bennett, were appointed delegates to next 
general meeting; and it was resolved, that in future 
the Association would not send any of her funds to 
that meeting. 

1816. On Saturday before the first Sunday in 
October, 1816, the Association met at Log Chap- 
el, Martin county, 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 2'oi 

The Elders appointed being absent, Elder Am- 
ariah Biggs preached the introductory sermon from 
Romans, viii. 29,30: "For whom he did foreknow, 
he also did predestinate to be conformed to the im- 
age of his Son, that he might be the first-born a- 
mong many brethren. Moreover, whom he did 
predestinate, them he also called: and whom he 
called, them he also justified; and whom he justi- 
fied, them he also glorified." 

The Association was opened with prayer by El- 
der Joseph Biggs, and appointed Elder Jesse Read 
Moderator, and Elder Joseph Biggs Clerk, who 
<£alled brother Barrow to act as assistant Clerk. 

Brethren in the ministry from sister Associations 
were invited to seats, when Elders William J. 
Newborn and John Landress, seated them- 
selves. 

Letters from 25 churches were read, which 
showed the number baptized the past year to be 44, 
then in fellowship in the churches 1834, 

A letter from the Chowan Association, with 
some minutes, by their messenger Elder Spivey; 
one from the Red River Association; one from the 
Little River Association, Kentucky, inviting cor- 
respondence; and one from the Flat River Associa- 
tion, with some copies of their minutes; by the 
hands of Elder Elisha Battle were received. 

Brethren Little and Barrow were appointed the 
committee on finance^ Elders Read, Spivey, and J. 
Biggs, to examine the circular letter; Elder Amari- 
ah Biggs, to write to the Neuse; brother Barrow, to 
the Red River; brother Clark, to the Chowan; 
Elder Read, to the Virginia Portsmouth; Elder 
Lawrence, to the Country Line; brother John W. 
Mayo, to the Flat River; and brother Jesse Powell; 
to the Little River Associations. 
IS 



202 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

Eiders Land ress, Spivey, and Lawrence, vve^e 
appointed to preach on Sunda}'. 

The Association adjourned with prayer by the 
TVIoderator. 

Sunday, Elders Spivey, Landress. and Law- 
rence, preached. 

Monday, the Association was opened with pray-* 
er by Elder Newborn. - 

The next Association was appointed tote held at 
the Falls of Tar River, Nash county, to commence 
on Saturday before the first Sunday in Oct, 1817. 

Elder Luke Ward was requested to deliver the 
introductory sermon, and in case of his failure, El- 
der Joseph Biggs. 

Letters to the Neuse, Chowan, Virginia Ports- 
mouth, Flat River, Country Line, Red River, Ten- 
nessee, and Little River, Kentucky, were read and 
approved, and Elders Lawrence and A. Biggs ap- 
pointed messengers to the Neuse; Elders Read and 
Lawrence to the Chowan and Virginia Ports- 
mouth; Elders Lancaster and A. Biggs, to the Flat 
River; Elder Read apd brother Barrow, to the 
Country Line; and Elder Joseph Biggs was reques- 
ted to forward the letters to the Red River and 
Little River Associations. 

The committee appointed to examine the circu- 
lar letter reported, that it was unfinished and re- 
commended that part of the writings of Robert 
Hall be adopted as a circular; which was agreed to. 

Brother Bennett Barrow was appointed the 
standing secretary of this Association, to corres- 
pond with ; the Board of Foreign Missions. 

Elder Araariah Biggs was appointed to prepare 
the next circular letter. 

The Association after deliberation concluded not 
lo seud any delegates to the general meeting of cor- 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 203 

respondence, and brother Barrow was appointed to 
give information thereof to said meeting, to be con- 
veyed by Elder Read, with four dollars contribu- 
ted by individual churches to its fund. 

Elder JOHjY BOTFLY] 
Was born January 3d, 1774, in Beaufort coun- 
ty, of poor but respectable parents. His father's 
name was also John, who was born and raised on 
Town Creek. His occupation was that of a wheel- 
wright, and was assiduously followed by him and 
bis son. Young Bowin was a very worthy youth, 
always advocating by precept and example the no- 
ble principles of honesty and industry. He was 
very moral in his life and conversation. His pa- 
rents w r ere strict Episcopalians, and brought up 
their children in the rites and ceremonies of that 
church. Their religion tolerated civil amuse- 
ments, such as dancing. John from his youth was 
fond of the sport, and being so much delighted 
with it, was for several years a fiddler himself, hav- 
ing no concern about the salvation of his soul, sup- 
posing that to be safe and considering it only ne- 
cessary to attend to the outward forms of his then 
favorite Church of England. But it was pleasing to 
God for the gospel of his free grace to be preached 
in his vicinity, and it was attended with such pow- 
er that it brought him to doubt his former religion. 
Those amusements admired so much by some pro- 
fessors, he found to be a sword or thorn to his 
heart, making a wound and causing a pain which 
he by all his reformation could not cure. Not- 
withstanding his sin, guilt, and condemnation, 
which resulted from the violation of a pure law, and 
which unsheathed the glittering sword of justice, 
threatening immediate death; yet when faith pre- 



204 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

sented a dying Saviour to his view, he was then 
brought to see the justice of God in his soul's sal- 
vation, by which means he rejoiced in God his Sa- 
viour. From the time of his conversion he never 
would allow his children to dance; on being re- 
minded of his formerly doing so, the reply would 
be, u Yes, in my youth and ignorance I did so, but 
I have seen the time 1 had to mourn on account of 
it." He became a member of the Baptist church 
at Morattock, in September, 1802; which was un- 
der the pastoral care of Elder Amariah Biggs. In 
the summer of 1804, he was set apart for the admi- 
nistration of gospel ordinances, by fasting and 
prayer. His preaching was much approved by the 
churches. He married as early as 1798, Mary, 
the daughter of Thomas Garrett, of Martin coun- 
ty. He had at the time of his death nine children, 
three sons and six daughters. The increase of his 
family and their dependent situation called his at- 
tention so much at home, that he labored under 
great disadvantage in the ministry* He was com- 
pelled to labor hard all his time while at home and 
attend his stated meetings on Saturday and Sun- 
day. A kind providence, however, directed his 
way down to Mattamuskeet Lake to which place 
he removed about the year 1805 or 6, where we 
are satisfied he was a blessing in the hands of God 
to many souls. The church at that place at the 
time of his removal was reduced to a very low ebb, 
but soon recovered under his ministry. He was a 
man of unshaken resolution, a strict republican in 
his principles and a very sentimental man through 
all his life. His peculiar views, in political, do- 
mestic, or religious affairs he would defend with 
much energy. In religious matters he was a pre- 
destinarian, believing salvation to be by grace 



i 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 205 

without the deeds of the law; the righteousness of 
Christ imputed to us by faith and sanctification by 
his blood. The dead state we are all in by na- 
ture he believed eut us short of all power in doing 
any thing in whole or in part of our salvation: 
This led him warmly to espouse the "effectual call'* 
and "the saints final perseverance." These were 
articles which he held dear to his soul, but he wa£ 
not so pointed a preacher as some of his brethren 
in the ministry. It was thought by the brethren 
of his acquaintance that he was at times a great 
experimental preacher, and on experimental and 
practical godliness he mostly dwelt. The church 
at Mattamuskeet in her low condition was in neect 
of such a man, for her situation was like EzekielV 
vision of the dry bones; and God was able as h£ 
did perfect his means by bringing about a revival 
ki Mattamuskeet church, through brother Bowin, 
as in Ezekiel's time, by causing a great army to 
rise up. He preached and baptized many, and a- 
niong the rest Elder Green Carrowan, who profes^ 
sed to have been converted before he saw brother 
Bowin. Brother Carrowan has expressed that 
brother Bowin was to him like Peter was to Corne- 
lius, telling him what he ought to do; for under his' 
preaching he learnt baptism to be a believer's duty^ 
and accordingly was baptized by Elder Bowin. 
For three or four years never were brethren more 
united as fellow laborers. Soon after Elder Car- 
rOwan^s baptism, he commenced in the ministry as 
co-laborer with Elder Bowin. The church ap- 
peared to be fully in the gospel chariot, riding 
with truth and meekness at the side of her heavenly 
bridegroom in her full pomp of grace and gl^ry. 
Her watchmen were zealous in crying aloud, mani- 
festing great love and anxietv for Zion's welfark. 
18* 



Jog HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

About this time a happy revival took place on Mal- 
tamuskeet Lake, Swan Quarter, and the island of 
Cinetuck. The church increased to nearly 200 
members. The church in Carteret county, inclu- 
ding Core Sound, Cedar Island, Hunting Quar- 
ters, Portsmouth, North River, and the Straits t 
were also benefitted by their labors. The church 
of Mattamuskeet had usually met on the north side 
of the Lake, but as she was composed of members 
dispersed over a large part of the county, it was 
thought best to divide; and accordingly in the year 
1811, that division took place. The church on the 
9outh side made choice of Elder Carrowan as their 
pastor, who was ordained by a presbytery; and 
Elder Bowin retained the pastoral care of the 
church on the north side. Peace and harmony 
prevailed but a little time. Here we can but drop 
a tear of sympathy and cry with one of old, What 
is man? The enemy took the advantage by sow- 
ing seeds of discord between these ministers 
,^vhich were never removed. This unhappy divi- 
sion between these ministers, was thought by many 
to have been caused by one William Ashley, at that 
time a member of the church, who after feathering 
his own nest and showing his cloven foot, proved 
that he was no friend to either. It is certain this 
unhappy affair was fine diversion for the devil, for 
when the members would meet at their public 
meetings, instead of talking about that which might 
tend to edify, this unpleasant subject was the main 
topic of conversation to the great grief of many 
pious and godly souls. The dispute ran so high 
that parties were formed. Things thus continued 
until the fall of 1814, when brother Bowin remov- 
ed his family into a settlement called Long Acre, 
"near his father, in Washington county. He still 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 207 

continued to attend the north church at their quar- 
terly meetings. The churches at north Deep 
Creek and Blount's Creek, also enjoyed some ben- 
efits from his ministerial labors. He departed this 
life about the 1st of August, 1815, after a short but 
painful illness. Wliile on his death bed he was vis- 
ited by a brother who enquired of him how he did. 
His reply was, "rough and thorny is the way, but 
sweet will be the issue" — from which we may just- 
ly infer that he was still strong in the faith, and 
steadfastly believed a crown of never fading glory 
was laid up for him in heaven above. "Blessed 
are they who die in the Lord.*' We hope his hap- 
py soul is now far beyond the reach of sorrow. 

1817. On Saturday before the first Sunday in 
October, 1817, the Association convened at the 
Falls of Tar River. 

The introductory sermon was delivered by El- 
der Joseph Biggs, from 1 Kings, vi. 8: "The door 
for the middle chamber was in the right side of the 
house: and they went up with winding stair§ into 
the middle chamber, and out of the middle into the 
third." Prayer by Elder Amariah Biggs. 

The Association was opened with prayer by El- 
der William Hyman, and appointed Elder Bennett 
Moderator, and Elder Biggs Clerk, and brother 
John H. Drake assistant Clerk. 

Letters from 25 churches were read, from which 
it appeared that there had been baptized the past 
year 48, then in fellowship 1739. 

A letter from the Chowan Association, by their 
messenger Elder John Roe, and one from the Red 
River Association, were received and read. 

Elder Elisha Battle presented some copies of the 
minutes of the Flat River Association, and seated 
himself. 



£08 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

Brethren Collins and Powell were appointed a 
committee on finance; Elders Biggs, Lawrence, 
and Bennett to examine the circular letter; Elder 
Read, to write to the Flat River; brother Collins, 
to the Neuse; brether Drake to the Red River; El- 
der Lawrence, to the Little River; Elder Hyman, 
to the Chowan; and brother Powell, to the Virginia 
Portsmouth Associations. 

The next Association was to be held at Skewarkey 
meeting house, Martin county, to commence or* 
Saturday before the first Sunday in October* 
J818. 

Elder Bennett was requested to deliver the in- 
troductory sermon, and in case of his failure, El- 
der Lawrence. 

Elders, Roe,. Lawrence, and Hyman^ were ap- 
pointed to preach on Sunday. 

The Association received from the Secretary 50 
copies of the proceedings of a General Convention 
of Baptists in the United States, held in Philadel- 
phia from 7th to 14th May, 1837, for which the 
Association returned thanks. 

Some copies of the minutes of the Raleigh As^ 
sociation were received and distributed. 

Elder Lawrence was appointed messenger to the 
Neuse; Elders Bennett and J. Biggs, to the Cho* 
wan; Elder Lancaster, to the Raleigh; and Elder 
Amariah Biggs, to the Virginia Portsmouth Asso^ 
ciations. 

The Association then adjourned with prayer by 
Elder Roe. 

Sunday, Elder Hyman preached from Solomon's 
Songs, vi. 13: "Return, return, O Shulamite; re- 
turn, return, that we may look upon thee. What 
will ye see in the Shulamite? as it were the compa- 
ny of two armies." Elder Roe preached from % 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 209 

Samuel, xiv. 14: "For we must needs die, and are 
as water spilt on the ground, which cannot be gath- 
ered up again; neither doth God respect any per- 
son: yet doth he devise means, that his banished be 
not expelled from him." Elder Lawrence preach- 
ed from St. John, xxi. 4: "But when the morning 
was now come, Jesus stood on the shore." 

Monday, the Association was opened with pray- 
er by Elder Micajah Ambrose. 

The Rules of the Association were read. 

A letter from the Neuse Association, with some 
minutes, was received by brother Samuel Simpson* 
fheir messenger. 

Letters to the Flat River, Virginia Portsmouth, 
Red River, Little River, Chowan, and Neuse Asso- 
ciations, were read and approved. 

The churches were requested to signify in their 
letters to next Association, whether they approve of 
the general meeting and wish to continue a mem- 
ber thereof. 

Elder Amariah Biggs was appointed to write the 
next circular letter* 



CHAP. V. 

m 

I, Proceedings of the Association at Skewarkey,in 

IS 18. 2. At Deep Creek, in 18 19— Biography 

• of Elder Jonathan Cherry. 3. Proceedings at 

North Creek, in 1820. 4. At Medrn's Chapel, 

in 1821. 

The Association met at Skewarkey meeting 
house, according to appointment. 

Elder Philemon Bennett preached the introduce 



aiO HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

tory sermou from Revelations, xi. 1: "And ther^ 
was given me a reed like unto a rod: and the angel 
stood, saying, rise, and measure the temple of Godjr 
and the altar, and them that worship* therein." 
Prayer by Elder Lawrence. 

The Association was opened with prayer by El- 
der William Hyman, and chose Elder Bennett Mo- 
derator, and Elder Biggs Clerk, who called to his 
assistance brother John H. Drake. 

Letters from 27 churches were read, from which 
it appeared there had been baptized therein during 
the past year 41, and then in fellowship 1634. 

A letter from the Netse Association, with 25 
copies of their minutes, by their messengers Elder 
Dupree and brother Simpson; one from the Chow- 
an, by their messengers Elders Spivey and New- 
born, with 25 copies of their minutes; one from the 
Red River, and one from the Little River Associa- 
tions, were received. 

The Association received 16 copies of the fourth 
annual report of the Baptist Board of Foreign 
Missions, from the United States Convention at 
Philadelphia. 

Brethren Powell and Mayo were appointed thj* 
committee on finance; Elders Lawrence, Biggs, 
and Bennett, to examine the circular letter; brother 
Drake to write to the Neuse; Elder Biggs, to the 
Virgitfla Portsmouth; brother Powell, to the Cho- 
wan; Elder Lawrence, to the Red River; and bro- 
ther Mayo, to the Little River Associations. 

Elders Dupree, Bennett, and Lawrence, were 
appointed to preach on Sunday. 

The next Association was appointed to be held 
at Deep Creek meeting house, Halifax county, to 
commence on Saturday before the first Sunday in 
October, 1819. 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 211 

Elder Joseph Biggs was requested to deliver 
the introductory sermon, and in case of his failure, 
Elder Luke Ward. 

The Association then adjourned with prayer by 
Elder iVIicajah Ambrose. 

Sunday, Eide* Dupree preached from Hebrews, 
viii. 3: "For every high priest is ordained to offer 
gifts and sacrhices: wherefore it is of necessity that 
this man have somewhat also to offer. " Elder 
Bennett preached from Proverbs, iv. 18: "Bat the 
path of the just is as the shining light, that shineth 
more and more unto the perfect day." Elder Law f - 
rence preached from Psalms, cxxvi. 3: "The 
Lord hath done great things for us, whereof we 
are glad." 

Monday, the Association was opened with pray- 
er by Elder W^ard. 

The committee appointed to examine the circu- 
lar letter reported, that none had come to hand; 
whereupon Elder Read was appointed to prepare 
one to be attached to the minutes, to be inspected 
by Eiders Lawrence, Bennett, and Hyman. 

Elder Amariah Biggs was appointed messenger 
to the Virginia Portsmouth; Elders J. Biggs, and 
Bennett, to the Chowan; and Elders Lawrence, and 
Hyman, to the Neuse Association. 

A letter to the Red River, and one to the Little 
River Associations, were placed in the hands of 
Elder Joseph Biggs, to be forwarded. 

Elder Biggs was requested to procure a blank 
book and record the proceedings of this Associa- 
tion from the termination of Elders Biukitt and 
Read's history, and report the expense thereof. 

It was thought expedient to require in future the 
name of the querist, to be attached to every query 
.offered to this Association. 



212 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE- 

The Association then adjourned with prayer by 
the Moderator. 

1819. The Association met at Deep Creek 
meeting house, according to appointment. 

The introductory sermon was preached by Elder 
Joseph Biggs from Psalms, xlviii. 12, 13: "Walk 
about Zion, and go round about her: tell the tow- 
ers thereof. Mark ye well her bulwarks, consider 
her palaces; that ye may tell it to the generation 
following." 

The Association was opened with prayer by 
Elder Philemon Bennett, and appointed Elder 
Bennett Moderator, Elder Biggs Clerk, and bro- 
ther John H. Drake assistant Clerk. 

Brethren in the ministry from sister Associations 
were invited to seats, when Elders Newborn, 
Crompler, and Murrell seated themselves. 

Letters from 26 churches were read, from which 
it appeared there had been baptized the past year 
49, in fellowship at that time 1634. 

A church in Tarborough, Edgecombe county, 
petitioned for admission into this Association, and 
was received. 

Letters from the Neuse, and Little River Asso- 
ciations, were received; the former by Elder Bid- 
die their messenger, and the latter by Elder Biggs. 

Elder Newborn presented 30 copies of the last 
minutes of the Choivan Association. 

Brethren Powell, Collins, and Battle, were ap- 
pointed the committee on finance; Elders Bennett, 
Biggs, and Biddle, to examine the circular letter; 
brother Drake, to write to the Neuse; Elder Law- 
rence, to the Virginia Portsmouth; Elder Hyman 5 
and brother Micajah Mayo, to the Chowan Associ- 
ations* 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 213 

Elders Bennett, Lawrence, and Hyman, were 
appointed messengers to the Neuse; Elder Law- 
rence, to the Virginia Portsmouth; and Elders Law- 
rence, and Bennett, to the Chowan Associations. 

Elders Newborn, Biddle and Lawrence, were 
appointed to preach on Sunday. 

Elder Hyman and brethren Drake and Collins, 
were appointed to examine and report relative to 
the expense of recording the past minutes by Elder 

The Association adjourned with prayer by El- 
der Biddle. 

Sunday, Elder Newborn preached from Psalms, 
Ixxxiv. 11: "For the Lord God is a sun and shield: 
the Lord will give grace and glory; no good thing 
will he withhold from them that walk uprightly. 10 
Elder Biddle preached from Micah, iv. 1: "But in 
the last days it shall come to pass, that the moun- 
tain of the house of the Lord shall be established m 
the top of the mountains, and it shall be exalted a- 
i>ove the hills; and people shall flow into Hi" Elder 
Lawrence preached from St. John, iv. 9: "Then 
.saith the woman of Samaria unto him, how is it 
that thou, being a Jew, asketh drink of me, which 
•am a woman of Samaria? for the Jews have no 
dealings with the Samaritans." 

Monday, the Association was opened with pray- 
er by Elder Hyman. 

The Decorum of the Association was read. 

The next Association^was appointed to be held 
at North Creek meeting house, Beaufort county, 
to commence on Saturday before the first Sunday 
in October, 1820. 

Elder Bennett was requested to deliver an intro- 
ductory sermon, and in case of his failure, Elder 
Hyman. 

19 



214 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

Letters to the Chowan, Virginia Portsmouth, 
Neuse, and Red River Associations, were real 
and approved. 

The circular letter was read and ordered to be at- 
tached to the minutes. 

The committee appointed to examine the min=» 
utes, as recorded by Elder Biggs, reported, that 
it was correctly done and recommended that he be 
allowed three dollars and fifty cents: the Associa- 
tion concurred therewith. 

Elder Biggs was authorised to record such pf 
the circular letters as he might think proper. 

Brother John H. Drake was appointed to pre- 
pare the next circular letter. 

The Association then adjourned vvuh prayfy* 
by Elder Biddle. 

Query. When a church has made an order for a 
letter of dismission for a member and before he re-* 
ceives it proves guilty of misconduct which breaks 
fellowship, ought the letter to be given by the person 
appointed? 

Answer. We jthink members of churches being 
once so are always so until excluded, or wben join- 
ed to aaother church of the same faith and ordey 
wherefore, a member who ha& received a letter, or 
is about to receive one, is still amenable to the 
church, aud if fellowship is broken, the letter should 
be withheld; or if given, regained. 

Elder JONATHAN CHERRY, 

Was born agreeably to record on the 20th July # 
J 743. In early life he followed the fashion of the 
young and gay, but after coming to riper years he 
I>egan seriously to reflect about a future state, and 
found by the sacred scriptures and his own experi- 
ence that he was not prepared after death for a stajte 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 215 

si happiness beyond the grave. The greatest in- 
formation he could obtain on this all-important 
subject was derived from the sacred scriptures 
alone, for at that period there was very little prea- 
ching within his reach, except by such ministers as 
we believe were not sent of God. But upon seri- 
ous reflection and meditation he obtained clear 
views of his depravity and incapcity or qualifica- 
tions for future happiness. This had the happy ef- 
fect of informing his judgment aright, about the 
way of life and plan of salvation. He earnestly 
implored the favor of God and craved an applica- 
tion of Christ's merits, and in a short time obtain- 
ed them. He soon discovered it to be his duty to 
make a public profession of his faith. He attend- 
ed the church at Flat Swamp, related his experi- 
ence of grace, became a candidate for baptism and 
membership, and was received. When the mem- 
bers of this church living near Conoho Log Cha- 
pel increased, they petitioned for dismission from 
Flat Swamp to be constituted, of which number he 
was one. He had at this time been preaching 
some time, and on Saturday before the third Sun- 
day in December, 1S00, he was ordained to the ad- 
ministration of gospel ordinances on the itinerant 
plan, but did not take the pastoral care of that 
church but often served her as such. After the 
church at Cross Roads was constituted he became 
a member of her, took the pastoral care of her and 
continued in that office until his death, which took 
place on the 26th October, 1818. We doubt not 
but that he is now reaping the reward of his la- 
bors here. 

1 S20. Saturday before the first Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1820, the Association convened at North 
Creek meeting house. 



816. HISTORY op the KEHUKER 

The introductory sermon was delivered by Eldef 
Philemon Bennett, from Acts, xx. 24: "But none 
of these things move me, neither count I my life 
dear unto myself, so that I might finish my course 
with jo}', and the ministry which I have received of 
the Lord Jesus, to testifv the gospel of the grace of 
God." 

The Association was opened with prayer by El- 
der Hyman, and appointed Elder Bennett Modera- 
tor, and Elder Biggs Clerk, who called as assistant 
Clerk brother Jesse Little. 

Letters from 25 churches were read, which show- 
ed an increase by baptism the past year of 120, and 
that there were then in fellowship 1659. 

Elder Newborn, messenger from the Chowan 
Association, upon invitation seated himself with us. 
A letter from the Red River Association was re- 
ceived through Elder Biggs and read. 

Brother John W. Mayo was appointed to write 
to the Neuse; brother Henry Clark, to the Chowan; 
Elder Biggs, to the Red River; and brother L@- 
weliing Bowers, to the Little River Associations. 

Elders Joseph Biggs, Amariah Biggs, and Wil- 
liam Hyman, to examine the circular letter. 

The next Association was appointed to be held 
at Mearn*s Chapel, Nash county, to commence 
Saturday before the first Sunday in October, 1821. 
Elder Amariah Biggs was appointed to deliver 
the introductory sermon, and in case of his failure, 
Elder Joseph Biggs. 

Elders Bennett, Newborn, and Hyman, were ap- 
pointed to preach on Sunday. 

Sunday, was raining, and Elder Joseph Biggs 
preached in the meeting house from Isaiah, i. IB: 
"Come now and let us reason together, saiih the 
Lord." Elder Amariah Biggs preached from He 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 217 

brews, xi. 14: "For they that say such things de- 
clare plainly that they seek a country." 

Elder Hyman preached from the stage, from He- 
brews vi. 12: "That ye be not slothful, but follow- 
ers of them who through faith and patience inherit 
the promises." Elder Newborn also preached 
from St. Luke, xx. 46: "Beware of the scribes, 
which desire to walk in long robes, and love greet- 
ings in the markets, and the highest seats in the sy- 
nagogues, and the chief rooms at feasts." 

Monday, the Association was opened with pray- 
er by Elder Joseph Biggs. 

The Moderator was absent in consequence of in- 
disposition; whereupon, Elder William Hyman was 
appointed to supply his place the balance of thfr 
session. 

The committee appointed to examine the circu- 
lar letter reported, that they had received none,, 
and recommended a substitute; which was adopted* 

Elder Hyman was appointed messenger to the 
Neuse Association. 

Elder Biggs was appointed to prepare a letter 
to the Chowan Association, and forward it by El- 
der Bennett; Elder Biggs was also requested to 
prepare letters to the Red River and Little River; 
Associations, and forward them. 

Elder Biggs- was appointed to write the next cir^< 
cular letter. 

The Association then adjourned with prayer by 
the Moderator. 

1821. The Association convened at Mearn's 
Chapel, according to appointment. 

Elder Amariah Biggs preached the introductory 
sermon from Psalms, xciv. 1: "O God, to whom 
vengeance belongeth, shew thyself." 
19* 



218 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

The Association was opened with prayer by 
Elder Philemon Bennett, and appointed Elder 
Bennett Moderator, Elder Biggs Clerk, and bro- 
ther John H. Drake assistant Clerk. 

Brethren in the ministry from sister Associations 
were invited to seats, when Elders Spivey, Dupree, 
Worrell, Walke, and Bobbins, seated themselves* 

Letters from 27 churches were read, which show- 
ed an increase by baptism the past year of 1 54, 
then in fellowship in the churches 1746. 

A letter from the' Neuse Association, with 25 
topics of their minutes; one from the Chowan, by 
}heir messengers Elders Newborn, Crompler, and 
brother Cotton; and minutes of the Virginia Ports* 
mouth, by their messengers Elders Wolford and 
McGiamack, were received. 

A letter from the Red River Association was re- 
ceived through Elder Biggs. 

Elder Biggs, appointed corresponding secretary 
of tliis Association, presented a circular address 
rom the Baptist General Convention, accompanied 
with a letter from James Munroe, President of the 
United States, to the President of the Columbian 
College, in the District of Columbia. 

Brethren Mayo and Drake were appointed the 
committee on finance; Elders Lancaster, and Spi- 
vey, to examine the circular letter and address; 
brother Jesse Powell, to write to the Virginia 
Portsmouth; Elder Lawrence, to the Little River; 
Elder Hyrnan, to the Red River; brother Peter P* 
Lawrence, to the Chowan; and Elder Amariah 
Biggs, to the Neuse Associations. 

It was resolved, that the next Association be 
field at Cross Roads meeting house, Edgecombe 
countj', to commence on Saturday before the first 
Sunday in October, 1822/ 



r, 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 219 

Elder Moses Bennett was requested to deliver 
the introductory sermon, and in case of his failure, 
Elder Philemon Bennett. 

Elder Lancaster was appointed to prepare a cir- 
cular letter. 

Elders Lancaster, Spivey, and Lawrence, were 
appointed to preach on Sunday. 

Permission was granted, and the Moderator no- 
minated Elders Newborn, Carrowan, and Dupree, 
to preach on Monday. 

Elders Lawrence, Hyman, Bennett, and A. Biggs, 
were appointed a committee to consider the pro- 
priety of making some arrangements for the inter- 
change of ministers in the bounds of this Associa- 
tion. 

A packet of minutes from the Missionary Society 
at Wucacon, Bertie county, was received through 
Elder Lawrence. 

Sunday, in consequence of excessive rain Elder 
Dupree preached in the meeting house, from Su 
John, x. 16: "And other sheep I have, which are 
not of this fold: them also I must bring, and they 
shall hear my voice; and there shall be one fold, 
and one shepherd." Elder Lawrence preached 
from St. Mark, xiv. 5: "For it might have been 
sold for more than three hundred pence, and have 
been given to the poor. And they murmured 
against her." Elder Green Carrowan exhorted 
and prayed. 

Monday, the Association was opened with pray- 
er by Elder Newborn. 

The Rules of the Association were read. 

Elder Lawrence, and brother Jesse Powell, were 
appointed messengers to the Virginia Portsmouth 
Association. 

A letter to the Red River Association was read 



220 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

and approved^ and placed in the hands of the Clerk 
to be forwarded. 

A letter to the Little River Association was read 
and approved, and Elder Lawrence appointed 
messenger. 

Elders Amariah and Joseph Biggs, were appoin- 
ted messengers to the Chowan Association. 

The committee appointed to consider the propri- 
ety of an interchange of ministers reported, by sug- 
gesting as their opinion that an interchange of min- 
isters would be useful; but as that was a matter 
wholly resting with them, they recommended that 
the ministers should consult about it among them- 
selves and agree to change tours with each other 
twice or thrice a year amongst their churches. 
The report was concurred in. 

The committee appointed to examine the circu- 
lar address of the Baptist General Convention, re- 
ported, that they had not time to examine it and 
therefore submitted it without comment. The 
committee were discharged. It was resolved, that 
the corresponding secretary send one copy of our 
minutes to said Board. 

The circular letter was read, approved, and or- 
dered to be attached to the minutes. 

The Association then adjourned with prayer by 
the Moderator. 

Query. What shall a church do with a member 
who believes himself called to preachy when after 
hearing him for twelve months or more she receives 
no edification, shall she stop him or not? 

Answer. As a direct question requires a direct 
answer, we therefore say such a member ought to 
be stopped. 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 22,1 



CHAP. VI. 

I. Proceedings of the Association at Cross Roads , 
in 1822. 2. At Lawrence '$ meeting house, in 
1823. 3. At Great Swamp, in 1824. 4. *4* 
*Ae FaZ/s o/ Tar River, in 1825. 5. At Ske- 
warkey, in 1826 — Biography of Elder Jeremiah 
Mastin. 

On Satarda'y before the first Sunday in October, 
1822, the Association met at Cross Roads. 

The introductory sermon was preached by Elder 
Philemon Bennett from St. Mark, xvi. 15: "And 
he said unto them, go ye into all the world, and 
preach the gospel to every creature." Prayer by 
Elder Jeremiah Maslin. 

The Association was opened with prayer and ap- 
pointed Elder Bennett Moderator, Elder Biggs 
Clerk, and brother John H.Drake assistant Clerk. 

Letters from 25 churches were read, from which 
it appeared that there had been baptized the past 
year 94, then in fellowship in the churches 1522. 

A letter from a church recently constituted in 
Washington, Beaufort county, petitioning for ad- 
mission as a member of this Association was recei- 
ved and their prayer granted. 

A letter from the Chowan Association, by their 
messengers Elders Newborn, and James Ross; one 
from the Virginia Portsmouth, with 30 copies of 
their minutes, by their messenger Elder Nathaniel 
Chambless; one from the Neuse, by their messen- 
ger Elder Benjamin Bynum; and one from the 
Red River Association, through Elder Biggs; and 
an Address from the Baptist Board of Foreign 
Missions, through Elder Biggs, were received. 



ftp HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

Brethren John H. Drake and Peter P. Law- 
rence were appointed a committee on finance; El- 
ders Biggs, Bennett, and Newborn, to examine the 
circular letter; brother Valentine Bailey, to Write 
to the Virginia Portsmouth; brother Lewelling 
Bowers, to the Chowan; Elder Biggs, to the Red 
River; brother Jesse Little to the Neuse Associa- 
tions; and Elder Biggs, to the Baptist Board of 
Foreign Missions at Washington City. 

It was resolved, that the next Association be 
held at Lawrence's meeting house, Edgecombe 
county, to commence Saturday before the first Sun- 
day in October, 1823. 

Elder Joseph Biggs was appointed to deliver 
the introductory sermon, and in case of his failure, 
Elder Amariah Biggs. 

Elders Chambless, Newborn, and Amariah 
Biggs, were requested to preach on Sunday, and in 
case of the failure of either, Elder Jeremiah Mastinv 

The Association adjourned for the day with 
prayer by Elder Chambless. 

Sunday, Elders Chambless ; Newborn, and Mas- 
tin, preached. 

Monday, the Association was opened with pray- 
er by brother Peter P. Lawrence. 

Elders Amariah Biggs, and Lawrence were ap- 
pointed messengers to the Neuse; Elder Mastin, 
and brother William Dicken, to the Virginia Ports- 
mouth; and Elders Joseph Biggs, Hyman, and 
Bennett, to the Chowan Associations. 

The committee appointed to examine the circular 
letter reported, that none had come to hand and 
recommended that such information as could be ob- 
tained of the spread of the gospel and revivals of 
religion should be substituted; whereupon, Elders 
Biggs and Newborn, and brethren Peter P. Law- 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. £23 

mice, John H. Drake, and James S. Battle, were 
appointed to collect all the information within 
their power to be inserted in the minutes, and El- 
der Biggs was requested to add such advice to the 
churches as in his opinion might tend to produce a 
revival among them. 

Brother Peter P. Lawrence was appointed to pre- 
pare the circular letter for next Association. 

It was recommended to the churches that the 
first Wednesday in November be observed as a day 
of fasting and prayer to Almighty God, invoking 
a revival of religiorr. 

It appearing that the churches at Sandy Creek, 
Reedy Creek, and Mattamuskeet, had failed to re- 
present themselves in this Association for some 
time past, it was resolved, that Elders Amariah 
Biggs, Bennett, and Hyman, be requested to visit 
the two former, and Elders, Mastin and Carrowan, 
the latter, and enquire into their standing and their 
reasons for not representing themselves; and report 
to next Association. 

The Association then adjourned with prayer by 
the Moderator. 

At this Association it was represented, that a 
practice prevailed calculated to injure the feelings 
of the truly pious by members of the Baptist chur- 
ches joining th« Masonic Society and frequenting 
their Lodges. The Association was then called on 
to advise the churches how to act in such cases. 
Whereupon, the following select committee were 
appointed to draft an answer of advice, \\z.: Elders 
Benjamin Bynum, William Dicken, Jeremiah Mas- 
iiu, and brethren John W. Mayo and James S. 
Battle, who reported the following: "We, your 
committee, appointed to draft an answer of advice 
.so the churches relative to the above quer^, would 



224 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

recommend to the churches to admonish such per- 
sons thus acting to desist from attending Masonic 
Lodges, which we think is calculated to injure the 
feelings of the truly pious; and should they refuse 
to submit to such admonition, that it would be dis- 
order in them for which they should be dealt with 
accordingly." The Association concurred with 
the report and ordered that the same be spread on 
their minutes. 

Query. How shall a church proceed who knows 
that two of her members are not in fellowship ivith 
each other? 

Answer, Let the parties comply with the direc- 
tions given in the xviiL chap, of St. xMatthew's gos- 
pel, and should they refuse to comply and yet be 
unreconciled, that they be called before the church 
and that the church enter into an investigation of 
the subject or matter of difference, and deal with 
the parties as they appear to deserve. 

1823. On Saturday before the first Sunday in 
October, 1823, the Association met at Lawrence's 
meeting house. 

The introductory sermon was delivered by Flder 
Joseph Biggs from J 2 Corinthians, iv. 5: "For we 
preach not ourselves, but Christ Jesus the Lord; 
and ourselves your servants for Jesus' sake." 
Prayer by Elder William J. Newborn. 

The Association was opened with prayer by E!~ 
der Philemon Bennett, when Elder Bennett was 
appointed Moderator, Elder Biggs Clerk, and 
brother Jesse Little assistant Clerk. 

Brethren in the ministry from sister Associations 
were invited to seats, when brethren William B* 
Worrell and Irvin Moye, seated themselves. 
* Letters from 26 churches were read> from whkfe 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 225 

ft appeared there had been baptized the past year 
119, in fellowship at that time 1772. 

A church at Goose Creek, Beaufort county, pe- 
titioned for admission as a member of this Associ- 
ation, and upon satisfactory information was receiv- 
ed; as was also a church at Red Bud, Franklin, 
county. 

Letters from the Neuse, by their messenger Ei- 
der Dupree; from the Chowan, with minutes, by 
their messengers Elders Newborn and Crompler; 
and from the Red River Association, through El- 
der Joseph Biggs, were received. 

Brethren Jesse Powell and John W. Mayo were 
appointed a committee on finance; Elders Amariah 
Biggs, Newborn, Bennett, atid Worrell, to exam- 
ine the circular letter; Elder Lawrence, to write 
to the Virginia Portsmouth; Elder Mastin, to the 
Chowan; Elder Amariah Biggs, to the Neuse; and 
Elder Joseph Biggs, to the Red River Associations. 

The next Association was appointed to be held at 
Great Swamp meeting house, Pitt county, to com- 
mence on Saturefcy before the first Sunday in 
October, 1824. 

Elder Philemon Bennett was requested to deliver 
the introductory sermon, and in case of his failure, 
Elder Joshua Lawrence. 

Elders Mastin, Amariah Biggs, William B. Wor- 
rell, and Philemon Bennett, or any three of them, 
w T ere appointed to preach on Sunday. 

The Association adjourned for the day with 
prayer by Elder Mastin. 

Sunday, Elder Bennett preached from St. Mat- 
thew, xxviii. 18, 19: "And Jesus came, and spake 
unto them, saying, all pow^r is given unto me in 
heaven and in earth. Go ye therefore, and teach 
all nations, baptizing them iu the name of the Fa? 
20 



£26 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

iher, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghos|," 
Elder Mastin preached from 2 Timothy, i. 9: "Who 
hath saved us, and called us with a holy calling, 
not according to , our works, but according to his. 
own purpose and grace, which was given us in 
Christ Jesus before the world began." Elder Wor- 
rell preached from Psalms, Ixxxix. 15: "Blessed is 
the people that know the joyful sound: they shall 
>'alk, O Lord, in the light of thy countenance." 

Monday, the Association was opened with prayer. 

The committee appointed to examine the circu- 
lar letter reported, that none irad been received 
and recommended that the circular letter of the 
Country Line Association he adopted; which w r as 
read and ordered to be attached to the minutes. 

Elders Mastin and Amariah Biggs, were ap 
pointed messengers to the Neuse; Elder Lawrence 
and brother Mark H. Bennett, to the Chowan and 
Virginia Portsmouth Associations; and Elder 
Biggs was requested to forward the letter to the 
Red River Association. 

It was recommended to the churches, that the 
last Thursday in this month be observed as a day 
of fasting and prayer to Almighty God. 

The church at Poplar Spring, Franklin county, 
petitioned for a letter of dismis/ion Jo hecome ^ 
member of an Association piore convenient; which 
was granted. 

The Association then adjourned with a warm 
exhortation by the Moderator, and prayer by EU 
der Mastin. 

Query. Is it thought proper to retain in fellow? 
ship a member who clears ovt race-paths or svffer^ 
it to be done on his landj or who erects Jive bjuttpr 

■£&$wejr. Npc 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 22? 

£824. The Association met at Great Swamp 
tReeting house, according to appointment. 

The introductory sermon was preached by El- 
der Philemon Bennett from 1 Peter, iv. 5: "Who" 
shall give account to him that is ready to judge the 
quick and the dead." Prayer by Elder Newborn. 

The Association was opened with prayer by El- 
der Hyman, and appointed Elder Bennett Modera- 
tor, Elder Biggs Clerk, and Elder Newborn assist-t 
zni Clerk. 

Brethren its the ministry frorrf sister Associations 
trere invited to seats, when Elders Howell and War- 
ren, seated themselves. 

Letters from 27 churches were read, from which 
it appeared that there had been baptized the past 
year 160, then in fellowship in the churches 1500. 

A church lately Constituted on the Sound Side; 
prayed for admission as a member of this Associa- 
tion, and upon satisfactory information was received. 

A church also lately constituted at the head of 
Pungo River petitioned for admission, but in con- 
sequence of some difficulties tfreir application wa3 
laid on the table until Monday. 

A letter from the Red River Association, by 
Elder Biggs; one from the Neuse, by their messen- 
gers Elders Dupree and Biddle; and one from the 
Chowan Association, accompanied with minutes, 
by their messengers Elders Newborn and Reuben 
Lawrence, and brother William EL Jordan, were 
received. 

An Address from the Board of Managers of 
the Baptist Convention of the United States, was 
received. 

Elders Bennett, Newborn, Biddle, and Beattie, 
were appointed to examine the circular letter; bre- 
thren John W. Mayo and James S. Battle, a.cifti- 



228 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

mittee on finance; brother Henry Clark, to write 
to the Chowan; brother Beattie to the Neuse; El- 
der Biggs, to the Red Rivera Elder Newborn, to 
the Virginia Portsmouth Associations; and Elder 
Joseph Biggs, to the Board of Managers of the 
Baptist Convention. 

It was resolved, that the next Association be 
held at the Falls of Tar River, Nash county, to 
commence on Saturday before the first Sunday in 
October, 1825. 

Elder William Lancaster was requested to deliv- 
er an introductory sermon, and in case of his fail- 
ure, Elder •Amariah Biggs. 

Elder Lancaster was appointed to prepare the 
circular letter for next Association. 

Brethren Howell, Jordan, and Biddle, were ap- 
pointed to preach on Sunday. 

Sunday, brother Howell preached from Revela- 
tions, vh 17: "For the great day of his wrath is 
come, and who shall be able to stand." Brother 
Jordan preached from Psalms, cvii. 7: "And he 
led them forth by the right way, that they might 
go to a city of habitation." Elder Biddle preach- 
ed from Rev* x. 1: "And 1 saw another mighty 
angel come down from heaven, clothed with a cloud: 
and a rainbow was upon his head, and his face was 
as it were the sun, and his feet as pillars of fire." 
Monday, the Association was opened with pray- 
er by Elder James Ambrose. 

The circular letter was read and ordered to be at- 
tached to the minutes. 

Elders Joseph Biggs and P. Bennett, were ap-» 
pointed messengers to the Chowan Association; 
a letter to the Virginia Portsmouth Association was 
placed in the hands of Elder Newborn, to forward; 
Elders Hyman, Ward, Hosea Lanier, and Beattie^ 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. £29- 

were appointed messengers to the Neuse; and Eld«- 
*r$ Bennett, and Mastin to the Raleigh Associations 

After deliberating on the petitionary letter of 
the church at the head of Pungo River, it was con- 
cluded not to receive said church at this time. 

It was represented by sundry persons formerly 
znemb-ens-G-f the church at North Creek, that diffi- 
culties existed in the church at that place which 
oughttobe investigated; it was thereupon resolved, 
that Elders Biggs, Hyman, Ward, James Ambrose,, 
and Lanier, and brethren John Mooring and John 
W. Mayo, be appointed a committee to visit said' 
church on Friday before the fourth Sunday in No- 
vember following, to take, the grievances under con- 
sideration, give such advice and aid to said 
church as they may think, advisable, and report to 
next Association! 

The Association requested the churches not to 
neglect appointing delegates annually, who will be 
punctual in their attendance. 

The Association then adjourned with an affect 
tionate address by. the Moderator, and prayer by- 
Elder Joseph Biggs. 

Query., Is it agreeable to gospel order for mem- 
bers of & Baptist church to withdraw themselves- 
from the church ta which they/belong, or join another - 
of the same faith and order without a regular dis- 
mission? ok, for another church is receive such fnem^ 
bers without such dismission?. 

Answer. On gospel principles we think that in 
each case it is wrong... 

18-25". The Association convened at the Falls of/ 
Tar River meetinghouse, agreeably to appointments. 

Elder Amariah Biggs preached the introductory 
sermon from Isaiah, lv. 12., 13: "O thou, afflicted* A 
20* 



230 HISTORY or the KEHUKEE 

tossed with tempest aud not comforted: Behold, ? 
will lay thy stones with fair colors and lay thy 
foundations with sapphires, and I will moke thy 
windows of agates, and thy gates of carbuncles, and 
all thy borders of pleasant stones; and all thy chil- 
dren shall be taught of the Lord, and great shall 
be the peace of thy children." Prayer by Elde v r 
Joseph Biggs. 

The Association was opened with prayer by El- 
der Philemon Bennett, and appointed Elder Ben- 
nett Moderator, and Elder Biggs Clerk, who call- 
ed to his assistance brother Peter P. Lawrence. 

Brethren in the ministry from sister Associations 
were invited to seats, when Elders Worrell, How- 
ell, Thomas, and Beattie, seated themselves. 

Letters from 30 churches were read, from which 
it appeared there had been baptized the past year 
180, then in fellowship in the churches 1798. 

A letter from the church at the head of Pungo 
River, petitioning for admittance into this Associa- 
tion was read, and upon satisfactory information 
she was received. 

A letter from the Neuse Association, by theip 
messenger Elder Dupree; one from the Virginia 
Portsmouth, accompanied with some copies of their 
minutes, by their messenger Elder Robert Murrell, 
were received. 

The committee appointed at last Association to 
visit the church at North Creek reported, that they 
had discharged the task assigned them, and endea- 
vored to remove the difficulties; whereupon the 
committee were discharged. 

Elders Bennett, Dupree, and Murrell, were ap- 
pointed to examine the circular letter; brethren Jesse 
Powell, and James S. Battle, a committee on 
finance; brother Petqr P. Lawrence,, to write to the 



"BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 281 

j 

Chowan; Elder Hyman, to the Neuse; Elder Biggs,, 
to the Red River; Elder Worrell, to the Virginia 
Portsmouth Associations; and Elder Biggs, to the 
Baptist General Convention at Washington City. 

It was resolved, that the next Association be 
!ield at Skewarkey meeting house, Martin county, 
to commence on Saturday before the first Sunday 
hi October, 1826. 

Elder Philemon Bennett was requested to deliver 
an introductory serhion, and in case of his failure, 
Eider Joshua Lawrence. 

Eiders Murrell, Thomas, and Worrell, were re- 
quested to preach on Sunday. 

The Association adjourned for the day with 
prayer by Elder Murrell. 

Sunday, Elder Murrell preached from Psalms, 
xxxiv. 19: "Many are the afflictions of the righte- 
ous; but the Lord delivereth him out of them all.** 
Elder Thomas preached from Micah, v. 5: "And 
this man shall be the peace, when the Assyrian shall 
come into our land: and when he shall tread in our 
palaces, then shall we raise against him seven shep- 
herds, and eight principal men." Elder Worrell 
preached from St. Matthew, xiii. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9: 
"Some fell upon stony places, where they had not 
much earth: and forthwith they sprung up, because 
they had no deepness of earth: and when the sun 
was up, they were scorched; and because they had 
no root, they withered away. And some fell a- 
mong thorns; and the thorns sprung up, and cho- 
ked tl^em: but other fell into good ground, and 
brought forth fruit, some a aundred-fold, some six- 
ty-fold, some thirty-fold. Who hath ears to hear, 
let him hear." 

Monday, the Association was opened with pray- 
er by Elder Joseph Biggs. 



232 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

The assistant Clerk, brother Peter P. Lawrence, 
being absent, bis place was filled by brother Daniel 
Biggs. 

Elders Hyman and Lawrence, were appointed 
messengers to the Nease; and Elder Lawrence to 
the Virginia Portsmouth Associations. 

The committee appointed to examine the circular 
letter reported, that none had been received. 

Brother Peter P. Lawrence was appointed to 
prepare the circular letter for next Association* 

It was recommended to the churches, that the 
fourth Sunday in November and the first Sunday in 
March following, be set apart and observed as days 
of fasting, prayer, and thanksgiving to Almighty 
God for the temporal and spiritual blessings rectlr 
ved from him, and that we implore him for a revi- 
val of religion at large, and more especially in the 
bounds of this Association.. That these days be 
observed from the evening previous until sunset of 
the day succeeding by strict* abstinence from food 
and luxuries of any kind,., and. that the members of 
the churches endeavor to assemble at their several 
places of public worship at the usual hours, with 
such of their neighbors and friends as may think 
proper to jointhem. 

It was r.esplved, that from facts that may come 
to the knowledge of the editor of the minutes,. he 
insert a biographical notice of Elder Jeremiah Mas* 
tin. 

The Association then adjourned with an addresS- 
by the Moderator, and prayer by Elder Beattie* 

1826. Agreeably to appointment the Association 
met at Skewarkey meeting house. 

The introductory sermon was preached by Elder 
Philemon Bennett from Acts, xx. 28; "Take beed^ 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 233 

therefore unto yourselves, and to all the flock over 
the which the Holy Ghost hath made you over- 
seers, to feed the church of God, which he hath 
purchased with his own blood." Prayer by Elder 
Amariah Biggs. 

The Association was opened with prayer by 
Eider Philemon Bennett, and appointed Elder 
Bennett Moderator, Elder Biggs Clerk, and bro- 
ther Joseph D. Biggs assistant Clerk. 

Brethren in the ministry from sister Associations 
were invited to seats, when brother Amos Rayner 
seated himself. 

Letters from 28 churches were read, which show- 
ed an increase by baptism the past year of 3 40^ 
then in fellowship in the churches 1900. 

A letter from a church recently constituted at 
Little Alligator, Tyrrell county; also, one from a 
church at Blount's Creek, Beaufort county, (dis- 
missed from the Neuse Association,) praying ad- 
mission as members of this Association, were read 
and upon satisfactory information being adduced, 
they were received. 

A letter from the Neuse Association, with some 
copies of their minutes, by their messenger Elder 
Jrvin Moye; and minutes of the Chowan Associa- 
tion, by Elder James Ross, and brother William H. 
Jordan, were received. > 

Elders Biggs, Lawrence, Hyman, and brother 
Jordan, were appointed to examine the circular let- 
ter; brethren James Mayo and James S. Battle, a 
committee on finance; Elder Lawrence, to write to 
the Neuse; and Elder Hyman, to the Chowan As- 
sociations. 

Elder Lawrence was requested to prepare a cir- 
cular letter for next Association. 

It was resolved, that the next Association be held 



234 HISTORY op the KEHUEEE 

at Kehukee meeting house, Halifax county, to com- 
mence on Saturday before the first Sunday in Oc- 
tober, L827. 

Elder Joseph Biggs was appointed to deliver 
the introductory sermon, and incase of his failure, 
Elder Green Carrowan. 

Elders Carrowan, Lawrence, and Jordan, were 
appointed to preach on Sunday. 

The Association then adjourned for the day with 
prayer by brother Jordan. 

Sunday, Elder Carrowanpreached from Joshua, 
vi. 26: "He shall lay the foundation thereof in hit 
first-born, and in his youngest son shall he set up 
the gates of it*" Brother Jordan preached from 
1 Corinthians, iii, 21, 22: "Therefore let no man 
glory in men: for all things are yours; whether 
Paul, or Apollos, or Cephas, or the world, or life, 
or death, or things present, or things to come; all 
are yours." Elder Lawrence preached from St. 
Mark, xvi. 15, 16: "And he said unto them, go ye 
into all the world and preach the gospel to every 
creature. He that believeth and is baptized, shall 
be saved; but he that believeth not shall be damn- 
ed." Prayer by Elder James Ross. 

Monday, the Association was opened with prayer. 

Elders Joshua Lawrence, John Tice, and broth- 
er Mark H. Bennett, were appointed messengers to 
theNeuse; and Elders Biggs, Bennett, Hyman,and 
Lawrence, to the Chowan Associations. 

The committee appointed to examine the circu- 
lar letter reported, that none had been received and 
that they had not time to select any thing in place 
thereof; whereupon they were discharged, and the 
Clerk was requested if he could obtain a biography 
i>f Elder William Lancaster, to attach that to the 
minutes in lieu of a circular. 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, 23S 

A paper purporting to be a declaration of the 
Reformed Baptist Churches in North Carolina, 
(read on Saturday and laid on the table until this 
day,) was called up for discussion and was refer- 
red to the churches, to report in their letters to 
next Association their views on each article there- 
in contained. 

The Association then adjourned with prayer by 
brother Jordan, 

Elder JEREMIAH MAS TIN, 
Was born in Frederick county, Virginia, on the 
I2th January, 1760. His father and mother were 
both members of a Baptist church, and for a long 
time adorned their profession with pious lives. The 
cubject of the following memoir has often been 
heard to say, that when quite young he had serious 
thoughts about a future state, but like many other 
young people he would strive to stifle these good 
.impressions for which he was afterwards sorely 
grieved. The people in his vicinity appeared to 
.be very thoughtless about religion, as there was 
very little preaching and that little was by the min- 
isters of the Church of England, until he came to 
years of maturity which was during the Revolu- 
tionary war. In that struggle he was found con- 
tending among jhat glorious band of heroes to 
whom under God we are indebted for our national 
independence. On returning from the scene of 
war to the place of his nativity, he was seized with 
thoughts of futurity. About this time the few Me- 
ihodist preac&ers thatiiad come from England to 
America, and others who had been raised up to the 
work of the ministry through their instrumentality 
began to travel and preach in the section of coun- 
try where he lived. His curiosity led him out ts 



256 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

give them a hearing and under their preaching he 
was convicted for sin and was for scwne time in 
great distress of soul and began to think hiaday of 
grace was passed. But God in his own good and 
appointed time revealed to him a Saviour for sin- 
ners, and by his divine Spirit applied the righteous- 
ness of Christ to him as a needy and helpless onej 
by which he was delivered from the weight and 
burden of sin and enabled to rejoice in God his 
Saviour, which often through his long life in the 
ministry was a theme he loved to dwell on. Soon 
afterwards he united himself with that religious so- 
ciety and continued with them for many years. He 
soon began to exhort his fellow creatures and pray 
with and for them. His impressions increasing, he 
united himself with the itinerant ministers of that 
order and began to travel. He was very indefati- 
gable in preaching and forming circuits and socie^ 
ties for several years. In March, 1790, he married 
in the county of Craven, in this State, and settled 
in the town of Newbern, where he resided a period 
of twenty-four years, during which time he wafe a 
very zealous and favored herald of the cross, and 
one of the most respectable merchants of the place. 
In his intercourse with the world, he scrupulously 
practised those moral and christian duties which he 
enjoined from the pulpit. His house was the wel- 
come asylum of the poor and afflicted, who ever 
found in him an efficient friend. In 1814, he re- 
moved to Washington, where he continued to 
preach with much acceptance. Finding that the 
" doctrine of free grace was well supported by the 
scriptures, and the only ground for the sinner to 
place his hope upon, and believing himself remiss 
in his duty (for he had not yet submitted to the or- 
dinance of baptism by immersion,) and not confer- 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 237 

ring with flesh and blood any longer, he determin- 
ed that the scriptures in future should be his guide. 
He therefore applied to the Baptist church at 
Tranter's Creek for membership, and upon rela- 
ting his experience of grace was received as a can- 
didate for baptism. The time appointed to per- 
form the ordinance was a few days after, and the 
place near Washington, where he might have it 
more in his power to make a public profession of 
his faith, and evince his readiness to follow his 
Lord into the watery tomb. A large concourse of 
persons attended, with several of the adjacent min- 
istering brethren and professors of religion. The 
sight was truly pleasing and affecting, for he was 
accompanied in the reception of this ordinance by 
his wife and several others. Upon the administra- 
tion of the ordinance Elder Mastin appeared to 
feel like the Eunuch of old, who went on his way 
rejoicing. Shortly afterwards brethren in the mi- 
nistry were called on by the church at Tranter's 
Creek, and formed a presbytery for his ordination 
to the administration of gospel ordinances. He 
soon after with others petitioned the church for 
dismission to form a church in Washington; which 
was constituted with about twenty members. El- 
der Mastin took the pastoral care thereof, and she 
soon was much increased, so that at his death she 
consisted of about sixty members. Elder Mastin 
having been absent from his native State for many 
years, became anxious to visit it again, and on the 
7th August, 1825, he left his family and the church 
over which the Holy Ghost had made him over- 
seer. On his way he visited several brethren in the 
ministry of the Baptist order, and finally arrived 
at his place of destination on the 23d of August. 
Having been exposed to the extreme heat of the sun 
21 



23S HISTORY of the KEHUKBE 

.on his journey, he was arrested by sickness, whicU 
on the 31st of August, 1825, terminated his life in 
the 66th year of his age. Thus fell a devoted ser- 
vant of God, and as a numerous acquaintance can 
testify, an upright and valuable citizen. "Blessed 
are the dead that die in the Lord: Yea, saith the 
Spirit, for they rest from their labors and their 
works do follow them." We may truly say, "a 
great man hath fallen in Israel," who left behind 
him an affectionate wife and three children, with $ 
large circle of acquaintances, to mourn their loss. 



CHAP. VII. 

1 . Proceedings of the Association at Kehukee mee ting 
house, in 1827. 2. At North Creek, in 1828— 
Biography of Elder Amariah Biggs. 3. Pro- 
ceedings at Little Conetoe Creek, in 1829 — De- 
claration respecting Missionary and Bible {Socie- 
ties, Theological Seminaries, fyc. 4. Proceed- 
ings at Morattock, in 1830. 

The Association met according to appointment 
<at Kehukee meeting house, in 1827. 

The Elders appointed to deliver an introductory 
sermon being absent, Elder Philemon Bennett 
preached from Psalms, cvii. 7: "And .he led them 
forth by the right way, that they might go to a ci- 
ty of habitation.' 5 

The Association was opened witbprayer by El- 
der Philemon Bennett, and appointed Elder Ben- 
nett Moderator, brother William Clark Clerk, and 
brother Joseph D. Biggs assistant Glerk. 

Brethren in the ministry from sister Associations 
w^re invited to seats, when brethren William 3 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION: 2$9 

Worrell, Mark H. Bennett, and James L. Warren, 
seated themselves. 

Letters from 35 churches were read, which show- 
ed an increase by baptism the past year of 1 19, and 
that there were then in fellowship 1951. 

A letter from a church lately constituted at Picot 
meeting house, Martin county, petitioning for mem- 
bership in this Association was read, and upon sat- 
isfactory information she was received. 

A letter from the Neuse Association, accompa- 
nied by some copies of their minutes, was received 
by Elder Benjamin Bynumi their messenger. 

Elders Bennett, Carrowan, Ward, and Worrell, 
Were appointed to examine the circular letter; bre- 
thren James Mayo, and James S. Battle, the com- 
mittee on finance; Elder Hyman to w T rite to the 
Neuse; and Elder Lawrence, to the Chowan As- 
sociation. 

Brother William Clark was appointed to write 
the circular letter for next Association. 

It was resolved, that the next Association be held 
at North Creek meetinghouse, Beaufort county, to 
commence on Saturday before the first Sunday in 
October, 1828. 

Elder Lawrence was appointed to deliver an in- 
troductory sermon, and in case of his failure, Elder 
Hyman. 

Elders Lawrence, Hyman, and Carrowan, were 
appointed to preach on Sunday. 

The Association then adjourned for the day 
with prayer by brother William Clark. 

Sunday, Elder Carrowan preached from St. 
John, iii. 8: "The wind bloweth when it listeth, and 
thou hearest the sound thereof, but canst not tell 
whence it cometh, and whither it goeth; so is every 
one that is born of the Spirit." Elder Hyman 



340 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

preached from James, ^.27: "Pure religion and 
undefiled before God anti the Father is this, to vi- 
sit the fatherless and widows in their affliction, and 
to keep himself unspotted from the world." Elder 
Lawrence preached from Exodus, xiv. 15: "And 
the Lord said unto Moses, wherefore criest thou 
unto me? Speak unto the children of Israel, that 
they go forward." Prayer by Elder Philemon 
Bennett. 

Monday, the Association was opened with pray- 
er by Elder Hyman. 

Elders Hyman, Tice, and Lawrence, were ap- 
pointed messengers to the Neuse; and Elders 
Ward, Lanier, and Clark, to the Chowan Asso- 
ciations. 

The committee appointed to examine the circular 
letter reported, that they had not time to correct it 
so as to make it suitable, as some agreeable things 
had happened since the sitting of this Association, 
and recommended that it should be again handed 
to the writer to prepare it so as to embrace the sub- 
ject. The report was concurred in, and Elders 
Bennett and Hyman were appointed to inspect it, 
before it was attached to the minutes. 

It was resolved, that the editor of the minutes of 
this year be directed to furnish the Chowan and 
^Neuse Associations with 30 copies each of the same. 

It was recommended to the churches composing 
this Association, that the first Sunday of each 
church's monthly meeting after the rise of this As- 
sociation, be by them severally observed as a day 
of thanksgiving to Almighty God, for his wonder- 
ful displays of divine grace at this Association, and 
for that love which appears still to exist among the 
brethren and churches that compose the same. 

A paper purporting to be a declaration of the 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 241 

Reformed Baptists in North Carolina, dated 26th 
August, 1826, which was presented at last Associ- 
ation and referred to the churches to expre'ss in 
their letters to this Association their views with re-v 
gard to it, came up for deliberation. Upon exami- 
nation it was found that most of the churches had 
given their opinions, and after an interchange of 
sentiments among the members of this body, it was 
agreed that we discard all Missionary Societies, 
Bible Societies, and Theological Seminaries, and 
the practices heretofore resorted to for their sup- 
port, in begging money from the public: and if 
any persons should be among us as agents of any 
of said societies, we hereafter discountenance them 
in those practices, and if under the character of a 
minister of the gospel, we will not invite them into 
our pulpits, believing these societies and institu- 
tions to be the inventions of men and not warranted 
from the word of God. We further do unanimous- 
ly agree, that should any of the members of our 
churches join the fraternity of masons, or being 
members thereof continue to visit the Lodges and 
parades, we will not invite them to preach in our 
pulpits, believing them to be guilty of such practi- 
ces; and we declare non-fe!low T ship with them and 
such practices altogether. 

It was resolved, that the minutes of this year be 
sent to Elder Joseph Biggs, (who is absent by sick- 
ness,) to prepare for the press. 
- The Association then adjourned with an affec- 
tionate address and prayer by the Moderator. 

1828. The Association convened at North 
Creek meeting house, agreeably to appointment. 

The introductory sermon was delivered by Elder 
Hyman, from 2 Corinthians, v. 20: "Now then t^e 
21* 



242 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

are ambassadors for Christ, as though God did be- 
seech you by us: we pray you in Christ's stead, be 
ye reconciled to God." Prayer by Elder Joseph 
Biggs. 

The Association was opened with prayer by El- 
der Green Carrowan, and appointed Elder William 
Hyman Moderator, and Elder Joseph Biggs Clerk, 
who called to his assistance Elder William Clark. 

Brethren in the ministry from sister Associations 
were invited to seats, when brethren Rayner and 
Whitford seated themselves; the former from the 
Chowan, and the latter from theNeuse Associations. 

Letters from 22 churches were read, which show- 
ed an increase by baptism the past year of 1 19, 
ihen in fellowship in the churches 2004. 

A letter from a church recently constituted at 
Grindle Creek, Pitt county; one from a church at 
Old Ford meeting house, Beaufort county; and 
one from a church at White Plains meeting house, 
Beaufort county, petitioning to become members 
of this Association, were read and upon satisfacto- 
ry information they were received. 

A letter from the Neuse Association, was recei- 
ved by Elder Dupree their messenger. 

Elders Hyman, Biggs, Carrowan, and Dupree, 
were appointed to examine the circular letter; bre- 
thren James Biggs, and Benjamin F. Eborn, a 
committee on finance; and brother William Clem- 
ents, to write to the Neuse Association. 

Elder Lawrence was requested to prepare a cir- 
cular letter for next Association. 

Elders Hyman and Carrowan, were appointed 
to preach on Sunday. 

.Sunday, Elder Carrowan preached from St. 
John. x. 27: "My sheep hear my voice, and I 
know them, and they follow me." Elder Hyman 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 243 

preached from Proverbs, ix. 1, 2: "Wisdom hath 
builded her house, she hath hewn out her seven pil- 
lars: she hath killed her beasts; she hath mingled 
her wine; she hath also furnished her table, " El- 
der Dupree preached from 1 Thessalonians, v. 17, 
18: "Pray without ceasing. In every thing give 
thanks: for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus 
concerning you." 

Monday, the Association was opened with prayer 
by the Moderator! 

Elders Carrowan, Ward. Lawrence, and brother 
Enoch Brickhouse, were appointed messengers to 
the Neuse Association. 

The circular letter was read and ordered to be at- 
tached to the minutes. 

Elder Joseph Biggs was appointed to write a 
letter of correspondence to the Chowan Associa- 
tion, and attach the signature of the Moderator 
and Clerk, and send them the usual number of 
minutes, to be conveyed by Elder^Villiam Clark, 
and brethren Enoch Brickhouse, Benjamin F. Eb- 
orn, and Robert F. Lcnier. 

It was resolved, that as the temporary dividing 
line in this Association, above and below 7 which the 
Association was to be held alternately, does not 
now equally divide the churches, that it be altered 
so as to begin at Hamilton, on Roanoke River, and 
run the direct road to Greenville, on Tar River* 

The next Association was appointed to be held at 
Little Conetoe meeting house, Edgecombe county, 
to commence on Saturday before the first Sunday 
in October, 1829, 

Elder Green Carrowan was appointed to deliver 
the introductory sermon, and in case of his failure, 
Elder William Clark. 

It was made known to this Association that some 



244 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

persons had suggested that the decision of the last 
Association, found in the 14th article of the min- 
utes, concerning Missionary and Bible Societies, 
Theological Seminaries, and Masonic Fraternities, 
was not correctly stated; and whereas many mem- 
bers of this Association were members of the last, 
it was resolved, that the article as it aippeared in 
ihe minutes contained the true spirit of the deci- 
sion, and that the Association did not approve of 
any alteration thereof, but advised the churches to 
adhere strictly thereto. 

The Association then adjourned with an ex- 
hortation by theModerator, and prayer by Elder 
Biggs. 

Elder AMARIAH BIGGS, 

Was born in Currituck county, on the 21st of 
October, 1769. He went to sea during the Revo- 
lutionary war when a boy, and was taken prisoner 
by the British and released upon the acknowledg- 
ment of American independence. He travelled 
considerably in England and France, before he 
could obtain a passage back to America. After 
reaching home, then in the 21st year of his age, he 
professed to have experienced religion. He mar- 
ried in Camden county, but shortly after moved 
into Halifax county. In the 23d year of his age 
he thought he was called to the work of the minis- 
try, and began to travel and preach. After living 
in Halifax about five years, he removed into Tyr- 
rell county and took the pastoral charge of the 
ehurch at Scuppernong. In the year 1802, he 
took a letter of dismission and became a member 
of the church at Morattock, and officiated as her 
pastor until his death, which took place by being 
drowned in crossing the Albemarle Sound on his 
return from a tour of preaching in the year 1S27, 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 245 

He left a wife and seven children to mourn their 
loss. He was a man of extensive talents as a prea- 
cher of the gospel, although he had never enjoyed 
but a small share of education in his youth. He 
possessed a great gift in spiritualizing the Old Tes- 
tament types and; shadows. He travelled exten- 
sively for 25 or 30 years with indefatigable indus- 
try in preaching the gospel, making long tours 
from home southwardly, westwardly, and north- 
wardly. We have reason to believe in this time 
many souls were added to the church through his 
ministry. Many looked to him as their spiritual 
father, whom the Lord had blessed as a means in 
his hands to bring them to the knowledge of the 
truth. He was highly esteemed by his brethren 
in the ministry and professors generally. We 
would have been glad, could we have done it con- 
scientiously, to have spread the mantle of love on 
his foibles with the same pleasure that we have de- 
clared his usefulness in the ministry. But truth 
and justice require a different course, for it is well 
known by his intimate acquaintances that for some 
time before his death he too much indulged himself 
in the use of ardent spirits to the great mortifica- 
tion of many of his dear brethren and often to his 
own. Some of his brethren were faithful with 
him and remonstrated against the impropiety of 
such a course, and he would often appear much 
grieved at his misconduct. The practice becom- 
ing more habitual, many of his brethren began to 
lose confidence in him; but he was taken from the 
evils ahead to another world. His foible should 
be a salutary and impressive lesson to professors of 
religion, more especially ministers of the gospel to 
avoid all practices so well calculated to weaken the 
confidence of their brethren, and destroy their use- 
fulness as ministers. While Elder Biggs walked 



346 HISTORY of the KEHOKEE 

worthy of his vocation he was a bright and shining 
light in the church, and we cannot but indulge the 
hope that this his besetting sin with all others, 
have been freely pardoned by his Saviour, and that 
his soul is now shining with the saints in rest. 

1829. The Association met at Little Conetoe 
Creek meeting house, according to appointment. 

The introductory sermon was preached by El- 
der William Clark, from St. Mark, xvi. 15: "And 
he said unto them, go ye into all the world, and 
preach the gospel to every creature." Prayer by 
Elder Lemuel Ross, 

The Association was opened with prayer by 
Elder William Hyman, and appointed Elder Hy- 
man Moderator, brother Benjamin F. Eborn Clerk, 
and brother Joseph D. Biggs assistant Clerk. 

Brethren in the ministry from sister Associations 
were invited to seats, when Elders Moye and Con- 
gleton, from the Neuse; and brother Rayner, fron* 
the Chowan Associations, seated themselves. 

Letters from 34 churches were read, from which 
U appeared that there had been baptized the past 
year 1 98, then in fellowship in the churches 2 1 50. 

A petitionary letter for membership in this Asso- 
ciation, from a church lately constituted at the 
Bear Grass meeting house, was read, and upon 
satisfactory information she was received. 

A letter from the Neuse Association, by their 
messengers Elders Dupree and Bynum, was recei- 
ved and read. 

A letter was presented from the minutes of the 
Chowan Association, by Elder Reuben Lawrence, 
and was read. 

A letter from the Raleigh Association, by their 
messenger Elder Dowd, was received and read. 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 247 

It was resolved, to open a correspondence with 
the Raleigh Conference and Nawhunty *\ssocia- 
tion, and Elder Joshua Lawrence was appointed to 
write and carry a letter to the former, and Elder 
William Hyman to the latter. 

Elders Lawrence, Hyman, and Clark, were ap- 
pointed to draft the resolution and decision of this 
Association at her sitting in 1827, in more explicit 
terms, relative to sundry articles then before the As- 
sociation, and which stands on the minutes of that 
year the 14th article; Elders Dupree, Worrell, and 
Clark, were appointed to examine the circular let- 
ter; brethren Thomas Biggs and Thomas Godwin, 
a committee on finance; and Elder William Clark, 
to write to the Neuse Association. 

Elders Lawrence, Dupree, and Worrell, were 
appointed to preach on Sunday. 

The Association then adjourned for the day with 
prayer by Polder Lawrence. 

Sunday, Elder Worrell preached from Ephesi- 
ans, v. 1, 2: "Be ye therefore followers of God, as 
dear children; and walk in love, as Christ also hath 
loved us, and hath given himself for us an offering 
and a sacrifice to God for a sweet-smelling savour," 
Elder Dupree preachedjrom Jude, i. 3: "Beloved, 
when I gave all diligence to write unto you of the 
common salvation, it was needful for me to write 
unto you, and exhort you that you should earnestly 
contend for the faith which was once delivered un- 
to the saints." Elder Lawrence preached from 
Hebrews, x. 35: "Cast not away therefore your 
confidence,which hath great recompence of reward." 

Monday, the Association was opened with pray- 
er by the Moderator. 

Elders Lemuel Ross and William Clark were ap- 
pointed messengers to the Neuse Association, 



248- HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

The committee appointed to draft more explicit- 
ly the resolution and decision of this Association in 
1827, reported: — 

"That they view with regret the incorrect in- 
ferences which have been drawn from the decision 
of this body in 1827, which have arisen in part 
from the misrepresentation of those who were af- 
fected by that decision, arising from a conviction 
that it would ultimate in the prostration of their 
fondest hopes of personal aggrandizement; and we 
are sorry to perceive in the words of the decision, 
that it affords the semblance of justification. We 
do deeply regret the influence which we perceive 
it has had upon our sister Associations, but we do 
not, we cannot, nor we will not recede from those 
measures in which we believe are involved the glo- 
ry ot God, the happiness and prosperity of this As- 
sociation, and the destiny of unborn millions. We 
however owe it to ourselves to make such explan- 
ations as will present to our brethren in clear and 
unambiguous terms, the attitude which this Asso- 
ciation has assumed and which by the help of God 
she will sustain. 

i4 We disclaim any right and consequently any 
intention either directly or indirectly of meddling 
with the internal government of any Association 
but our own. We do not assume to ourselves the 
right of saying that any member without the 
t>ounds of our Association shall or shall not do any 
act. They are accountable to their own respective 
Associations or churches, and not to us. But we 
do claim a right in the bounds of this Association 
to prescribe, (under the authority of the churches,) 
such rules and regulations as are indispensably ne- 
cessary to promote what we think will be for the 
peace and harmony of the churches within our 
bounds; and to discountenance such practices jp- 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 249 

ciong us as are calculated to interrupt our harmo-' 
ny. Therefore your committee do recommend the 
adoption of the following resolution & explanation: 

"First. We will not hold in our churches any mem- 
ber who is in the practice of visiting the Masonic 
4kodges, or who on any occasion conforms to their cus- 
tom of parades; nor will we countenance any such indi- 
vidual who may reside or come among us in the charac- 
ter of a preacher. 

"Secondly. We will not countenance- any preacher 
-who travels" within the bounds of this Association, esta- 
blishing societies for the collection of money, or who 
jnay himself be collecting money to support any institu- 
tion whatever. We do not attempt to circumscribe the 
jiberty of conscience: every person has a right to think 
and draw their own conclusions. We do not attempt to 
suppress the liberty of speech: every individual has a 
right to speak or express the convictions of their own 
mind. We do not attempt to restrain the liberty of any 
man: jhe may give his money when, and to whom he 
•pleases. We do not object to the spread of the Bible 
by all fair and honorable means; but pray for its exten- 
sion by means which -God may bless and own. We do 
,»ot object to the support of the ministry on the gospel 
.plan, but earnestly recommend it to the direct and im- 
dnediate attention of all the deacons in this Association; 
whose business God has made it to see to this matter a's 
<weil as all the monied concerns of the Christian com- 
rfnunity. We do not object to the general diffusion of 
tintelligence arid literature in the Baptist community, 
but wish its extension. But we do object to the educa- 
tion of men to the ministry by establishing seminaries 
for that purpose; believing that preaching would there- 
by become a lucrative employment like the law, phy- 
sic, 8cc. If any minister, although he may be a mis- 
sionary without the bounds of our Association, comes 
among us to preach the gospel and not to make collec- 
tions, we do not reject him." 

The report being read^wice was adopted and 
ordered to be spread on the minutes. 

The committee appointed to examine the circu- 
lar letter reported, that they approved of it: it was 
then read, and ordered to be attached to the minutes. 
22 



*50 HISTORY of the ILEHU&EE 

It was resolved, that 25 copies of the minutes # 
this year be seht to the Chowan and Raleigh Asso- 
ciations each. 

It was resolved, that the next Association be held 
at Morattock meeting house, Washington county, 
to commence on Saturday before the first Sunday 
"in October, 1830. 

Elder Lawrence was requested to deliver an in- 
troductory sermon, and in case of his failure, El» 
der Hyman. 

Elder Hyman was appointed to prepare a cir- 
cular letter for next Association* 

The minutes of this year were ordered to-be sent 
to Eder Joseph Biggs, (who was absent by sick- 
ness) to prepare for the press. 

The Association then adjourned with prayer by 
Elder Dupree. 

1830. According to appointment the Association 
snet at Morattock meeting house. 

Elder William Hyman preached the introducto- 
ry sermon from Acts, ii. 42: "And they continued 
steadfastly in the apostles' doctrine and fellowship, 
and in breaking of bread, and in prayers." Pray- 
er by Elder Lawrence. 

The Association was opened with prayer by El- 
.der Joseph Biggs, and appointed Elder Hyman 
Moderator, Elder Biggs Clerk, and brother Jo- 
seph D. tSiggs assistant Clerk. 

Letters from 32 churches were read, which 
showed an increase the past year by baptism of 120, 
in fellowship in the churches at that time 2225. 

A petitionary letter for membership in this Asso- 
ciation, from a church at Cowenjock, Currituck 
county, (which had been a member of the Chowan 
Association, but of late was dissatisfied with ifee 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 251 

proceedings of that body) was received and read, 
After a full investigation of the causes of her with- 
drawal from that Association and her reasons for 
a desire to join this, they proving satisfactory she 
was received. 

A letter from the Little River Association, in 
this State, accompanied with 35 copies of their 
minutes, by their messenger Elder Burrell Tem- 
ple; and one from the Nauhunty Association, by 
their messenger Elder Benjamin Bynum, with 30 
copies of their minutes, were received. 

A letter from Elder James Osborne, ofBalti* 
more, to this Association was received and read, 
and Elder Lawrence was appointed to answer it;- 
and it was ordered that said Setter be spread on 
the minutes for this year, and that a capy be fop- 
warded to him. 

Elder Hyman was appointed to write to the 
Little River Association, and Eider Luke Ward 
to the Nauhunty; Elders Hyman, Lawrence, Ward, 
and Carrowan, to examine the circular letter; and 
brethren James Biggs and Thomas Biggs, the com- 
mittee on finance. 

The next Association was appointed to be held at 
Flat Swamp meeting house, Pitt county, to com- 
mence on Saturday before the first Sunday in Oc- 
tober, 1831. 

Elder Green Carrowan was appointed to deliver 
the introductory sermon, and in case of his failure, 
Elder William B. Worrell. 

Elder Joseph Biggs was appointed to prepare 
3 circular letter for next Association. 

Elders Temple and Lawrence, were appointed 
to preach on Sunday. 

The Association adjourned for the day with 
prayer by Elder Lawrence 



«52 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

Sunday, Elder Temple preached from Ezekiel, 
xxxviL 3, 4: "And he said unto me, son of man, 
can these bones live? And I answered, O Lord 
God, thou knowest. Again he said unto me, pro- 
phecy upon these bones, and say unto them, O ye 
dry bones, hear the word of the LordJ 5 Elder 
Lawrence preached from Romans, xvi, 17, 18: 
"Now J beseech you, brethren, mark them which 
cause divisions and offences, contrary to the doc- 
trine which ye have learned; and avoid them. For 
they that are suct( serve not our Lord Jesus Christ, 
but their own belly; and by good words and fair 
speeches deceive the hearts of the simple." Pray- 
er by Elder William Hyman. 

Monday, the Association was opened with pray- 
er by Elder Carrowan. 

Brother Biggs, the assistant Clerk being absent* 
bis place was supplied by brother Benj. F. Eborn. 

Elder Hyman and brother John H. Daniel, were 
appointed messengers to the Little River, and El- 
ders Luke Ward and William Dicken, to the Nau- 
hunty Association. 

The circular letter was read, approved, and or- 
dered to be attached to the minutes. 

The Articles of Faith, and the Rules thereof 
were read. 

The subject of the publication of the History 
was considered, for which see Introduction. 

The Association then adjourned with prayer by 
Elder Joseph Biggs. 



CHAP. VIII. 

1. Proceedings of the •Association at Flat Sivamp 
meeting house , in 1831- — Biography of Elder 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 253 

James Ambrose. 2. Proceedings at Conoho Log 

Chapel, in 1832. 3. At the Falls of Tar River, 

in 1833 — Biography oj Elder Green Carrowan. 

Agreeably to appointment the Association met 
at Fiat Swamp meeting house, in 1831. 

The brethren appointed being absent, Elder 
Joshua Lawrence preached the introductory serv 
nion from Hebrews, xiii. 1: "Let brotherly love 
continue." 

The Association was opened with prayer by El- 
der William Hyman, and appointed Elder Hyman 
Moderator, Elder Joseph Biggs Clerk, and bro- 
ther Joseph D. Biggs assistant Clerk. 

Brethren in the ministry from sister Associations 
were invited to seats, when brethren John Atkin- 
son and Mark H. Bennett, from the Contentnea As- 
sociation, seated themselves. 

Letters from 42 churches were read, from which 
it appeared there had been baptized the past year 
429, then in fellowship in the churches 2683. 

A petitionary letter from a church at PowePs, 
Point, in Currituck county, (formerly a member 
of the Chowan Association,) for membership in 
this Association, was received by their messengers 
brethren James Melson and Willoughby Sawyer* 
and read; after the difficulties under which she la- 
bored and her faith were made known, she was re- 
ceived into this Association with 20 members. 

Elders Lawrence, Carrowan, and Micajah 
Ambrose, were appointed to examine the circular 
letter; brethren James S. Battle and William Long, 
a committee on finance; Elder William Hyman, to 
write to the Contentnea; and brother Joseph D. 
Biggs, to the Little River Asocialions. 

Elders Lawrence and Hyman were appointed to 
preach on Sunday. 
22* 



£54 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

The Association adjourned for the day with 
prayer by brother Atkinson. 

Sunday, Elder Carrovvan preached from Joshua, 
vii, 25: "And Joshua said, why hast thou troubled 
us? The Lord shall trouble thee this day/ 5 El- 
der Lawrence preached from St. Mark, xvi. I5r 
"Preach the gospel to every creature." Prayer 
by Elder Hyman. 

Monday, the Association was opened with prayer 
by Elder Joseph Biggs. 

The churches at Sappony, Sandy Creek, Maple 
Spring, Red Bud, Peach Tree, Rocky Swamp* 
Quankey, Mearn's Chapel, and Fishing Creek, pe- 
titioned for letters of dismission from this body to 
form another Association with some churches from 
the Raleigh and Flat River, so as to make it more 
convenient; whereupon their petition was granted, 
and Elder Joshua Lawrence was requested to 
write a letter of dismission and give to them, at- 
taching thereto the signature of the Moderator, and 
Clerk. 

The circular letter was received through the 
committee appointed to examine it; it was read, 
approved, and ordered to be attached to the mi- 
nutes. 

Letters to theContentnea and Little River Asso- 
ciations were read and approved, and brethren 
John H. Daniel and Edmund Andrews appointed 
messengers to the former, and brethren John 
Ward and James S. Battle, to the latter. 

A letter from Elder James Osborne, (of Balti- 
more,) was read. 

A resolution with regard to the publication of 
the History was made at this Association, for which 
-see Introduction. 

It was resolved, that the temporary dividing litfe 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 255 

tn this Association, above and below which the As- 
sociations were to be held alternately, be abolish- 
ed^ and that the Associations be held in future at 
those churches where it may be thought most ex- 
pedient. 

The next Association was appointed to be held at 
Conoho Log Chapel, Martin county, to commence 
on Saturday before the first Sunday in Oct. 1832. 

Elder Joseph Biggs was appointed to deliver an 
introductory sermofi, and incase of hij> failure, El- 
der Green Carrowan. 

Elder Joshua Lawrence was appointed to pre- 
pare a circular letter for that Association. 

The Association then adjourned with an address 
by the Moderator, and prayer by Elder Lawrence. 

Query. Are ministers of the gospel authorised to 
lay their hands (by forming a presbytery) on any 
person set before them for the office of minister or 
deacon; and if they are, what doth the same convey*? 

Answer. The New Testament points out four 
things for which the Apostles laid on their hands: 
1st. To give the Holy Ghost. 2d. To give the 
gift of the ministry. 3d. To ordain deacons. 
4th. To ordain to the ministry. To lay on hands 
in the two last cases ministers, we think, are autho- 
rised from the examples in the New Testament for 
the church's safety. In vi. chapter of Acts, we 
read, "Look ye out among you seven men of 
honest report, full of the Holy Ghost and wisdom, 
whom we may appoint." Here laying on of 
hands was not to give the Holy Ghost, but to ap- 
point, set apart, and ordain to office, to attend to 
the concerns of the poor of the church, &c» Then 
in xiii. chapter of Acts, we read, "As they minis* 
tered" — Who? (to wit) Barnabas, Simeon, Lucius, 
Manaen and Saul, These fiye teachers were all in 



256 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

the church at Aniioch — the Holy Ghost said to the 
church, "Separate me Barnabas and Saul for the 
work vvhereunto I have called them. And when 
they had fasted and prayed, and laid their hands on 
them, they sent them away." Here we see Barna- 
bas and Saul were ministering in the church be- 
fore hands were laid on them. Then it was not to 
give them the gift of the ministry, nor the Holy 
Ghost: but to set apart and ordain them to the of- 
fice of the ministry, to administer the ordinances, 
plant churches in the heathen world, without which 
ordination no man has a right to do. Then laying 
on of hands by a presbytery conveys nothing but 
office, a setting apart to office, a responsibility of 
office, a power to administer the ordinances, plant 
churches, feed and oversee the church of God, and 
rule over the church according to God's word, as 
they that must give an account. God commission- 
ed John the Baptist and Jesus Christ to office. 
Jesus Christ commissioned and ordained the twelve 
and seventy. The church at Jerusalem and the 
apostles ordained the deacons, and the church at 
Antioch with Simeon, Lucius, and Manaen, (who 
were teachers) ordained Saul and Barnabas to the 
ministry. The power then of appointing deacons 
or ministers is vested in the church, and none has 
a right or power to convey it but the church. She 
ought then to be cautious, very cautious, since she 
is accountable to Jesus Christ for sending or hold*- 
ing in fellowship such as preach false doctrines. 
To confirm this, read the three first chapters of tfye 
Revelations to St. John. 

Elder JAMES AMBROSE, 

Was born 15th November, 1765, in the county 
of TyrreHj (since Washington.) He embraced re- 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 257 

ifgion in the 21st year of his age. He held an 
honorable standing in the church at Scuppernong, 
of which he was a member up to the year 1805, 
and about this time he thought he was called of 
God to the work of the ministry. In 1809, he was 
ordained and authorised to administer the gospel 
ordinances. He was very useful under God in his 
neighborhood in the administration of medicines, 
particularly in the cure of warts. About four 
years before his d^ath, age and affliction almost 
deprived the churches of his usefulness. About 
the 23d of April, 1830, he was attacked with ex- 
cruciating pains, and never enjoyed the pleasure of 
walking airy more. He died on the 18th of May, 
1830, in full assurance of faith, being in the 65th 
year of his age. He was held in high estimation 
by all classes of men, and by the Baptist churches 
generally whom he visited. He was remarkably 
affectionate and tender hearted while preaching, 
seldom delivering a sermon without shedding tears. 
His gifts were not above mediocrity, yet his mild 
manner of preaching so attracted the attention of 
the people, that he was highly esteemed by his 
hearers. We strongly calculate that he is now 
"where the wicked cease from troubling, and the 
weary are at rest." 

1832. The Association met at Ccnoho Log 
Chapel, according to appointment, on Saturday be- 
fore the first Sunday in October, 1832. 

Elder Joseph Biggs delivered the introductory 
sermon from 1 Corinthians, xiv. 40: "Let all things 
be done decently and in order." Prayer by Elder 
Mark H. Bennett. 

The Association was opened with prayer by 
Elder William Hyman, and appointed Elder Hy- 



253 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

man Moderator, Elder Biggs Clerk, and brother- 
Joseph D. Biggs assistant Clerk. 

Brethren in the ministry from sister Associations 
were invited to seats. 

Letters from 29 churches were read, which show- 
ed an increase by baptism the past year of 97, and 
that there were then in fellowship 2014. 

Elders Thomas Dupree and Mark H, Bennett, 
messengers from the Contentnea Association, hand- 
ed in sundry copies of their minutes. 

Petitionary letters from churches ktely consti- 
tuted at North Mattamuskeet, in Hyde county; and 
Hunting Quarters, in Carteret county, for mem- 
bership in this Association^ were read and satisfac- 
tory information being obtained, they were re- 
ceived. 

Elders Biggs, Hyman, Duprae, and Bennett, 
were appointed to examine the circular letter; bre- 
thren Joseph S. Battle and James S. Battle, a 
committee on finance; brother Joseph D. Biggs, to 
write to the Contentnea and brother James S. 
Battle to the Little River Associations. 

Elders Lawrence, Dupree, and Bennett, were 
requested to preach on Sunday. 

It was resolved, that the next Association be 
held at the Falls of Tar River meeting house, 
Nash county, to commence on Saturday before 
the first Sunday in October, 1833. 

Elder William Hyman was appointed to deliver 
the introductory sermon, and in case of his failure, 
Elder George W. Carrowan. 

The Association then adjourned for the day 
with prayer by Elder Dupree. 

Sunday, Elder Dupree preached from St. John, 
x. 10: "I am come that they might have life, and 
that they might have it more abundantly." Elder 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, 259 

Lawrence preached from Psalms, xxxvii. 39: "But 
the salvation of the righteous is of the Lord." El- 
der Bennett being sick, the services of the day 
were closed with prayer by Elder Biggs. 

Monday, the Association was opened with pray* 
ex by Elder Biggs. 

The Rules of the Association were read. 

Letters to the Contentnea and Little Oliver As- 
sociations were read and approved, and Elders 
Lawrence and Hyman appointed messengers to the 
former, and brethren James S. Battle and Joseph 
,3. Battle to the latter. 

The circular letter was read and approved, and 
.ordered to be attached to the minutes. 

The publication of the History at this Associa- 
tion was deferred another year. 

Elder Luke Ward was appointed to write the 
circular letter for next Association. 

The Association then adjourned with prayer by 
Elder Joshua Lawrence, 

1833. The Association convened, according to 
appointment, at the Falls of Tar River meeting 
bouse, on Saturday before the first Sunday in Oc- 
tober, 1833. 

Elder William Hyman delivered an introducto- 
ry sermon from Acts, xxii. 1: u Men, brethren, and 
fathers, hear ye my defence which I make now 
unto you." 

The Association was opened with prayer by El- 
der Joseph Biggs, and appointed Elder Hyman 
Moderator, Eider Biggs Clerk, and brother Joseph 
P. Biggs assistant Clerk. 

Brethren in the ministry from sister Associations 
were invited to seats, when Elders Philemon Ben- 
nett, Mark H. Bennett, Thomas Dupree, Benjamip 



260 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

Bynum, BurrelJ Temple, and Eli Holland, seated 
themselves. 

Letters from 33 churches were read, from which 
it appeared that there had been baptized the past 
year 34, then in fellowship in the churches 1740. 

A letter from a church lately constituted on Ce- 
dar Island, in Carteret county, petitioning for mem- 
bership in this Association was read, and upon ex- 
amination she was received. 

Elders Dupree and Bynum presented sundry co- 
pies of the minutes of the Coirtentnea Association, 
stating their appointment as messengers. 

Elder Holland, a messenger from the Little Riv- 
er Association, presented sundry copies of their 
aainutes. 

Elders Dupree, Lawrence, Biggs, and Ward* 
were appointed to examine the circular letter; bre- 
thren James S. Battle and Joseph J, Pippen, a 
committee on finance;; brother Joseph D. Biggs, to 
write to the Contentnea; and brother R. M. G. 
Moore, to the Little River Associations. 

Elders Lawrence, Temple, and Dupree, were 
appointed to preach on Sunday. 

It was resolved, that the next Association be held 
at Cross Roads meeting house, Edgecombe county, 
to commence on Saturday before the 6rst Sunday 
in October, 1834. 

Elder George W. Carrowan was appointed to 
deliver an introductory sermon, and in case of bis 
failure, Elder Joseph Biggs. 

Elder Luke Ward was appointed to write the 
circular letter. 

The Association then adjourned for the day with 
prayer by Elder Mark H. Bennett. 

Sunday, Elder Temple preached from 2 Corin- 
ihians., ii. 1 1 : "For we are not ignorant of his d&* 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 261 

vices." Elder Lawrence preached from Isaiah 
liv. 5: "For thy maker is thy husband} the Lord 
of hosts is his name: and thy redeemer the Holy 
One of Israel; the God of the whole earth shall he 
be called." Elder Dupree preached from He- 
brews, ii. 3: "How shall we escape, if we neglect 
so great salvation." 

Monday, the Association was opened with prayer 
by the Moderator. 

Brother Joseph S; Battle was appointed one of 
the committee on finance, in the place of brother 
Pippen, sick. 

The committee appointed to examine the circular 
letter reported, that nene had been prepared, and 
recommended that one from the "Signs of the 
Times" be adopted. It was read, and after some 
small erasures, was approved and ordered to be at- 
tached to the minutes. 

Letters to the Little River and Contentnea As- 
sociations were read and approved, and Elders Luke 
Ward and Micajah Perry, and brother William 
Thigpen appointed messengers to the former; and 
Elders Lawrence and Biggs, to the latter. 

A final decision with regard to the publication 
of the History was made at this Association, which 
may be seen in the Introduction. 

Whereas the churches at Grindle Creek, Pitt 
county, and Tranter's Creek, Beaufort county, 
having neglected to represent themselves for some 
time in this Association, and having as the Associ- 
ation was informed discarded the Articles of Faith 
on which they were constituted: It was resolved, 
that they be struck from the list of churches compo- 
sing this Association. 

The Association disapprobated the conduct of 
those who were members of the churches at Old 
23 



262 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

Ford and Smithwick's Creek, that have departed 
from the Articles which those churches adopted at 
their constitution, and have established or attempt- 
ed to establish new churches at said places of ano- 
ther order under their former constitution. 

The Association then adjourned with an exhorta- 
tion by the Moderator, and prayer by Elder Biggs. 

Elder GREEN CARROWAN, 

Was born July 27th, 1778, of poor but respecta- 
Me parents; and although an intelligent boy, yet 
very wild, which often rendered his father very un~ 
happy. His father's name was William Carrowan, 
who was a preacher of the United Baptist Society, 
and formerly had the pastoral care of the church 
on Mattamuskeet, in Hyde county. The subject of 
this memoir, from the best information obtained, 
was among the most profane men that ever were 
raised in Hyde county. It was a source of deep 
^regret to his father until a few days before the old 
man's death, when it seems he had some presenti- 
ment that there would shortly be a change in the 
disposition of his son. He remarked to his faithful 
negro by the name of Jim, ''You'll find if you live 
agreatalteration in that younglad in a short time." 
What evidence was afforded him is unknown to us, 
but his prediction was verified in about two years. 
The younger Carrowan commenced his wild and 
profane course when a boy; for being a great mim- 
ic, often while his father was engaged in the sacred 
desk he was imitating his gestures out of doors. 
One time in particular he procured a stand out of 
doors, where the old man could be seen distinctly 
from the window, and while animated with his sub- 
ject gesticulating considerably, young Carrowan 
was imitating all his actions and repeating his 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 263 

frords. Yet in the height of his profanity his 
i^Shd proved rotten, and to rebuke him severely 
he was precipitated to the ground with great vio- 
lence. Indulging in his habits of vice, he collected 
several young men and became the head of a class 
in derision of the Methodists, who had a revival in 
his vicinity. These, with other vain and wicked 
acts, seemed to be his pursuit until the kindness 
and love of God was manifested, not through works 
of righteousness which he had done. He was ar- 
rested in his wild career in the 28th year of his 
age. His conviction was very pungent, but his 
delivery was clearly manifested. His call both to 
the fellowship of the saints and to the ministry were 
fully exhibited. He joined the §aptist church in 
Hyde county, and was baptised by Elder John 
Bowtn. He soon commenced the ministry as a co- 
worker with Elder Bowin, who had lately moved 
to Mattamuskeet. His preaching was greatly ap- 
proved by the churches, and he might be truly 
called a preacher from the commencement. He 
was possessed of great natural abilities, and a pro- 
found knowledge of the holy scriptures. His ser- 
mons were not of the oratorical style, but were 
well stored with scripture arguments, such as are 
rarely surpassed by any. He made a bold but 
humble appearance in the pulpit, and exhibited ve- 
ry clear views of the doctrines of the gospel. He 
displayed great ingenuity in communicating his 
ideas by metaphors and crude observations, which 
sometimes excited laughter in the irreligious and 
often would make the most serious Christian smile. 
He has been censured for this mode of preaching, 
yet he never failed to close his sermons with solem- 
nity. Often therefore it happened, that shortly af- 
ter laughing he would have his congregation shed- 



264 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

ding tears. Elder Carrowan labored under great 
disadvantages in early life. His father having set- 
tled in a retired part of Hyde county, the people 
were very unenlightened, and being poor he recei- 
ved but a limited share of education. He could 
with difficulty read the scriptures correctly. He 
was very industrious, and hard labor was his lot 
from infancy to death. In the year 1811, he took 
the pastoral care of the church of South Mattamus- 
keet, and served them in that capacity until the 
year 1822, when he removed to the South Side of 
Pamlico Sound, between Goose and Oyster Creeks. 
He shortly raised up a church on that side, of 
which he had the pastoral care and so continued 
until his death; yet he attended his old church, and 
had the oversight of her as occasional pastor. 
There might be many interesting and amusing an- 
ecdotes recorded of this man, if we depended upon 
common report; but as we are admonished to be 
cautious of that, and not willing to be unnecessari- 
ly tedious, we give one instance of his zeal and 
firmness to the discomfiture of his enemies. When 
Elder Carrowan first began to preach considera- 
bly, he visited the church on Core Sound, Hunt- 
ing Quarters. Previous to his visiting them, two 
Methodist preachers from Newbern had formed a 
considerable class at that place. Elder Carrowan 
in his ministration of the word pointed out an expe- 
rience of grace, and proved successfully from the 
scriptures the true believer's baptism. It produ- 
ced conviction, and many left the class and submit- 
ted to the ordinance of baptism by immersion. A 
young man from the neighborhood soon after went 
to Newbern, and the preachers being mortified at 
Elder Carrowan's success, hired him to take them 
down at the time of his next appointment, as they 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 255 

said they were determined to confute the babbleiv 
When arrived they found Elder Carrowan, who 
preached and authenticated and defended the gos- 
pel system both as to ordinance and doctrine with 
such success from the scriptures, that he whose lot- 
it was to follow acknowledged that according to 
the present translation of the scriptures, Carrow- 
an's doctrine could not be denied, but that fV iey 
were not correctly translated from the original 
Greek; remarking that his brother could correct 
ninety-five passages and himself fifteen or twenty. 
An old Baptist sitting under him, not accustomed 
to hearing the holy scriptures thus treated, looked 
up and remarked^ (instead of saying you are an 
emissary of the devil,) "you are an advisary of the 
devil; if the people feel disposed to hear you they 
can do so, birt I shall go out." The old man retired; 
and the people followed him, leaving the two Metho- 
dist preachers alone, who soon followed the crowd,, 
The young man required remuneration for his ser- 
vices in bringing them down, which was promptly 
paid by one but refused by the other,, on the ground 
that no chance had been afforded him to confound 
Carrowan. Truth being powerful, they were thus 
compelled 1 to leave their flock willing^ captives to 
Baptist principles, and Carrowan the babbler not 
so badly confounded as they anticipated. Elder. 
Carrowan was twice married. His first wife was a 
daughter of Foster Jarvis, of Swan Quarter; by her 
he had seven children* six of whom were alive at 
his death. His second wife was the daughter of 
4-Ienry; Carrow, of Mattamuskeet Lake; by her he 
had nine children, eight of whom were alive at his 
death* He possessed a strong constitution and en- 
joyed a great portion of health until about two 
years before his death. Notwithstanding a large, 
23* 



266 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

helpless and expensive family, almost wholly de- 
pendent on his labor for support, yet while in health 
he travelled extensively and preached, visiting ma- 
ny of the sister churches. He was much better 
^qualified for a gospel preacher than a disciplinari- 
an, and travelling and preaching better suited his 
talents than taking the pastoral care of churches. 
He had large and attentive congregations in his 
own neighborhood, and the singular manner of his 
preaching generally insured full assemblies wher- 
ever he went. In private conversation he was en- 
tertaining and agreeable, and those who heard him 
might with propriety say, this man says what he be- 
lieves and believes what he says. In his first reli- 
gious exercises he was led to dig deep into his own 
heart, where he found such opposition and rebel- 
lion that when he obtained pardon he attributed it 
to sovereign grace alone; and this sentiment was 
so interwoven in his soul, that he earnestly pro- 
claimed it to a dying world. Nothing appeared 
more disgusting to his mind, than to hear works 
and grace blended together as the foundation of a 
sinner's hope, and to hold forth the Lamb of God 
as a piece of a Saviour, or to consider the self-ex- 
ertions of the natural man meritorious. Hence he 
delighted in proclaiming eternal love, unmerited 
favor, and matchless grace. How many mourners 
he has comforted and wiped the tears from their 
weeping eyes. How many careless and uncon- 
cerned sinners he has been the means of awaken- 
ing. How many wavering minds he has establish- 
ed, and how many repentant sinners to whom his 
words have administered peace and consolation, can 
be only known at the great day of accounts. 

In the summer of 1831, he was taken with a fever 
which confined him a short time, but the fever abating 
H was hoped that it was only a slight attack so common 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 267 

in the low country. His health so much improved that 
he attended the Kehukee Association held at Flat 
Swamp in that year, and on Sunday was requested and 
preached from the stage from Joshua, vii. chap, part of 
25th verse: "And Joshua said, why hast thou troubled 
us? The Lord shall trouble thee this day." His ser- 
mon was edifying and proved to be his last. He began 
to grow worse from, that day, and it was with difficulty 
that he reached home, and it was soon discovered that 
his disease had changed to the dropsy, of which he ne- 
ver recovered. During his last sickness he employed 
much of his time in expounding the scriptures to his bre- 
thren and friends wno visited him, exhorting them ear- 
nestly to contend for the faith once delivered to the 
saints. He rejoiced that he was able to bear his afflic- 
tion with patience and fortitude, believing that he 
should shortly reach the heavenly mansions of the Lord. 
On the first Saturday in December before his death, 
Elder Carrowan was melted down in love and praise to 
the giver of all good, for his inestimable kindness in spa- 
ring him to witness the ordination of his brother George 
W. Carrowan and Asa Sawyer, respecting which he 
thus expressed himself- "I want words and a heart of 
more thankfulness to praise my kind Redeemer for spa- 
ring me to see him raise up even my brother in the flesh 
to go in and out before my old church, that he is so kind 
as to have already filled the vacancy my death will oc- 
casion." At that time a visiting brother in the ministry 
enquired the state of his mind and whether he regretted 
that his past life had been spent in proclaiming the doc- 
trines of predestination and election, the effectual call- 
ing and the saints' final perseverance? To which he re- 
plied, "Those glorious doctrines were taught me of the 
Lord in the 28th year of my age, and I have no doubt 
they will be sacred in my latest hours. But I have to 
regret that Thave been compelled to spend so much of 
my precious time in laboring for the support of my fa- 
mily, and thereby have failed fully to comply with that 
great command given me of the Lord, 'Preach my gos- 
pel to every creature.' But if it is the will of God to 
restore me to health, I intend that in future my days 
shall be spent in declaring to the world salvation through 
the merits of a suffering, dying and risen Redeemer." 
This great man of God conquered the last enemy and as- 
cended to that rest that remaineth for the people of God 
on 32st Jan, 1832, aged 53 years, 6 months and 4 days, 



268 HISTORY op the KEBtKEE 





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270 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 



CHAP. IX. 

History of the Churches, viz: Bear Grass, Blount's 
Creek, Cowenjock, Lonoho, Conetoe, Concord, 
Cross Roads, Cedar Island, Deep Creek, Falls 
of Tar River, Flat Swamp, Frying Pan, Goost 
Creek, Great Swamp, Hunting Quarters, Kehu~ 
kee, Lawrence's M. H. and Little Allki ator . 

We now proceed according to our arrangement 
to give a short History of each Church now in the 
Association, using such information derived from 
the old History as is deemed material. 

BEAR GRASS 

Church is situated in the county of Martin, about 
seven miles south-west of Williamston. She was 
for several years a branch of the church at Skewar- 
key. A meeting house was built by the brethren 
and neighbors not far from a water course by the 
Dame of Bear Grass, from which the name was de- 
rived, and conferences were held and gospel ordi- 
nances administered for several years by Elder Jo- 
seph Biggs, pastor of the church at Skewarkey. 
In the year 1829, the members of the church at 
Skewarkey, convenient to this place, petitioned for 
dismission to form a constitution, which was grant- 
ed, and Elders Joseph Biggs and Jeremiah Leg- 
gett constituted the church at this place with thirty 
members. She then ealled on Elder Biggs r who 
consented to serve her as an occasional pastor and 
continued to attend her until 1832, when from age 
and infirmity he declined. Two of her members, 
(viz:) Warner G. Bailey and Wjlliam Whitaker 
have been permitted by the church to exercise their 
ministerial gifts. The stated meetings of thfb? 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 271 

church are the Saturday before the third Sunday 
in every month. This church is attended by El- 
der John Ward as occasional pastor. 

BLOUNT S CREEK 

Church is situated in the county of Beaufort, oo 
the south side of Tar River. She was formerly a 
member of the Neuse Association and obtained a 
letter of dismission, and was received a member of 
this Association in the year 1826, with 62 mem- 
bers. This church is without a settled pastor. She 
was served occasionally by Elder Green Carrowan 
before his death. The stated meetings of this 
church are the Saturday before the fifth Sunday in 
£uch months as have five Sundays, 

CO WEN JOCK 

Church is situated in the county of Currituck, 
and was originally a branch of the church in Cam- 
den. In the year 1780, (according to Asplund's 
Register,) she was constituted, but was without a 
settled pastor. Elders Jonathan Barnes and Wil- 
liam Lurry were preachers in this church. She 
was attended and the ordinances administered by 
Elder Etheridge. This church was one of those 
who withdrew from this to form the Chowan Asso- 
ciation. In 1821, Elder Jeremiah Etheridge had 
the pastoral care of this church, and was succeeded 
in 1823 by Elder Malachi Corball, who continued 
until 1825. During this time there were raised up 
in this church to the work of the ministry, brethren 
Joshua Bell, Samuel Tatum, William Doxey, and 
Benonia Trueblood. and there were some additions. 
On the 21st of August, Elder Samuel Tatum took 
the pastoral charge of this church at her request 
and still continues in that office. There haye^so 



£72 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

been raised up to the ministry in this church, Fos- 
ter Jarvis and Joseph Foster. In 1829, she adop- 
ted the Articles and Resolutions of the Kehukee 
Association against the prevailing errors of the 
day, for which she was much stigmatized. The 
Association to which she belonged having adopted 
Missionary projects and countenanced Masonic 
practices in the members of churches, many of her 
members were much grieved and she finally resolv- 
ed to declare non-fellowship with them, and to at- 
tach herself to the Kehukee Association with whom 
she agreed. She accordingly petitioned and was 
received a member of this Association in the year 
2830, with 92 members. 

COJVOHO (otherwise Log Chapel) 
Church 3s situated in Martin county, and was 
formerly a branch of the church at Flat Swamp* 
She was dismissed and constituted in 1794. Short- 
ly after she called on Elder Amos Harrell, (a mem- 
ber of the church at Sandy Run, Bertie county,) to 
take the pastoral care, which he accepted and con- 
tinued her pastor for several years. After Elder 
Harrell's death, Elder- Benjamin Joyner served her 
as pastor some time, and was succeeded by Elder 
Jonathan Cherry. Since his death she has been 
without a settled pastor, but has been and is still 
served by Elder William Hyman as occasional 
pastor. Her stated monthly meetings are on Sat- 
urday before the first Sunday in each month. 

COJVETOE 

Church is situated in Edgecombe county, about 
eight miles south-east of Tarborough, and was 
formerly a branch of the church at Flat Swamp. 
While that church was under the pastoral care v£ 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 212 

Elder Joseph Biggs, he attended this branch quar- 
terly. After remaining as a branch for some lime 
she petitioned for dismission to be constituted, 
which was done on the Saturday before the fourth 
Sunday in July, 1803, by Elders Joseph Biggs, 
Jonathan Cherry and Joshua Barnes. At that 
time the church gave Thomas Ross, one of her 
members, a call to take the pastoral care, which 
he did not then accept; but on Saturday before the 
fourth Sunday in September following, he was or- 
dained by Elders Joseph Biggs, Jonathan Cherry, 
and Luke Ward, and received the pastoral care of 
the church in which he officiated until his removal 
to Tennessee. Since Elder Ross's removal this 
church has been without a permanent pastor, but is 
served by the neighboring ministers. Her stated 
monthly meetings are the Saturday before the third 
Sunday in each month. 

CONCORD 

Church is situated in Washington county. She 
joined this Association in the year 1810, with 58 
members, dismissed from Scuppernong church. 
In the month of May, 1810, she was constituted by 
Elders Micajah Ambrose and Amariah Biggs. The 
church after being constituted called on Elder Am- 
brose io lake the pastoral care of her, which he ac- 
cepted and continues to officiate in that capacity 
until this time. The stated meetings of this church 
are the Saturday before the fourth Sunday in eve- 
«ry month. 

CROSS ROADS 

Church is situated where two public roads cross 
in Edgecombe county, about eight miles from Tar- 
borough. Part of the members of this church were 
formerly members of the churches at Flat Swamp 
and Conoho, This church was constituted on the 
24 



274 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

Saturday before the second Sunday in July, 1808, 
by Elders Joseph Biggs and Jonathan Cherry* 
On the same day Elder Cherry was called to take 
the pastoral care of her, which he accepted and 
continued in discharge of that trust until his death, 
in the year 1818. After Elder Cherry's death, Ei- 
der William Hyman was called to officiate as pastor, 
and continues in that office to this time. Their stated 
monthly meetings* ar? the Saturday before the sec- 
ond Sunday in each month. 

CEDAR ISLAND 

Church is situated on an island of that name io 
Carteret county. She was constituted with about 
37 members, dismissed from the church at Hunting 
Quarters* She is without any permanent pastor. 
DEEP CREEK 

Church (formerly known by the name of Cone* 
conary) is situated in Halifax county. This 
church was originally constituted of members from 
neighboring churches. We think she never had 
any regular pastor. We understand and have 
reason to hope that she resists the Missionary pro- 
jects and Armenian tenets of the day; and we in* 
dulge the pleasing idea, that she will shortly be vi- 
sited with a divine shower of grace. Her regular 
meetings are on Saturday before the first Sunday 
in each month. 

FALLS OF TAR RIVER 

Church stands on the north side of Tar River, a. 
short distance from the Falls, io Nash county, 
and is a very ancient and respectable church. 
She was one of the first churches that Formed the 
Kehukee Association. From the best account 
that we can obtain, she was constituted on Swift 
Creek, by Elders C. Daniel and John Moore, in trie 
Tear 1757. Whether constituted on the free wiji 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 275 

or regular Baptist order, we are not able to say.. 
Elder John Moore was her pastor for many years, 
while she was on the regular plan. In the year 
1780, he took a dismission and removed out of the 
neighborhood, After this, Emanuel Skinner, a 
worthy member, being raised up and ordained hi 
this church, officiated as pastor, but was never ap- 
pointed by the church. In September, 1797, he 
took a dismission and removed to Cumberland, in 
Tennessee, In August, 1795, Elder Nathan Gil- 
bert, an ordained minister, joined this church on a 
letter of dismission from the Scuppernong church, 
who supplied the place of Elder Skinner. In the 
year 1798, the church unanimously requested El- 
der Gilbert to take the pastoral care, but he did 
not accept it until the year 1802. He continued 
in the pastoral care until his death, en the 1st of 
August, 1808. A glorious revival took place in 
this church in 1802 — 80 members were added b3' 
baptism, and in 1803, 74 more were received, 
Eighty members were the same year dismissed to 
form a church on Town Creek. After the death of 
EiderGilbert she called on Elder Joshua Lawrence.* 

*A young minister, eminent for his gifts and zeal, or- 
dained by Elders Burkitt and Read, at Fishing Creek, 
now Lawrence's meeting house, to take the pastoral 
care, which he accepted and thus became the successor 
of Elder Gilbert. In the course of a year or two a glo- 
rious revival succeeded under Elder Lawrence's minis- 
try, so that he baptized as many as 22 at one time, most- 
ly young men and women; and in two years there were 
upwards of 100 added to the church. As many as 150 
members have been added to the church under Elder 
Lawrence's ministry, and we hope the day of God's vi- 
sitation is again at hand, and the time of refreshment 
from his presence not far off. There have been since 
the constitution of this church 635 members of it. 
Eight ministers have been raised up in it, who became 
members by baptism, (viz:) Emanuel Skinner, Jordan 
Sherrod, Lewis Wells, John Atkinson, Elisha Battle, 



276 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

The meeting house is very large and commodious 
There have been and still are many very respecta- 
ble members of society here, especially the family 
of the Battles, and the memory of those gone will 
always be dear to this church and to all their ac- 
quaintances. Her regular meetings are the Satur- 
day before the first Sunday in every month. 

FLAT SWAMP 

Church is situated in the county of Pitt, near the 
line that divides it from Martin, not far from a 
Swamp of that name. About the year 1766, the 
spirit of the Lord began to breathe upon some of 
the dry bones in the valley of Flat Swamp and the 
Conetoe settlements, and several persons were se- 
riously impressed with the importance of religion, 
and accordingly an invitation was given to Elder 
Jonathan Thomas (pastor of the church at Toisnot, 
Edgecombe) to visit them, which he did and prea- 
ched successfully for some time. His labors were 
blessed and numbers embraced the doctrines of 
free grace. Several persons were received and 
baptized, and became a branch of the church at 
Toisnot. In the year 1771, Elder Thomas inform- 
ed them that he thought they were ripe for consti- 
tution, prepared a plan and set them on the busi* 
ness, which was nearly effected when Providence 
put a stop to it by calling this great man of God 
out of time and removing him to his eternal rest. 
In the beginning, however, of the year 1776, this 
church was constituted with the assistance of the 
father and brother of the deceased minister; and at 
the same time John Page, one of her members, was 
ordained to the administration of gospel ordinan- 
ces. Elder Page took the pastoral care of the 

Jesse Andrews, Dr. John Gilbert, son of Elder Nathan 
Gilbert, and Josiah Crudup — the four last of whom 
were baptized by Elder Lawrence in the revival. 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 2lf 

church, and labored with great zeal and success* 
Shortly afterwards a branch of this church was es- 
tablished at Skewarkey, in Martin county; another 
at Great Swamp, in Pitt county; another at Cono- 
ho (Log Chapel;) and afterwards one at Little Co- 
netoe, Edgecombe, county. In the year 1787, the 
branch at Skewarkey petitioned for dismission to 
be constituted, and after some delay it was granted 
in 1794. The branch at Conoho petitioned for 
dismission for the same purpose, which was grant- 
ed in 1795. Sometime previous to this the church 
had experienced great difficulties; as the love of 
many began to wax cold, it gave an opportunity 
for the enemy of souls to sow seeds of discord 
among them. The church still continued at ebb 
tide, while errors were spreading and extending in 
the doctrines of Armenianism and Universalism 
There were no ingatherings for several years, and! 
the Lord was pleased to call their pastor to his rest 
in 1795; and although there had been raised up in 
this church several preachers, yet at this time she 
was entirely destitute of ministerial gifts. In this 
destitute situation she raised her cries to the Lord 
to send forth laborers, or to raise up one to go in 
and out before her. We think the Lord in answer 
was pleased to send them Elder Joseph Biggs, 
(who had been lately received a member of the 
church at Skewarkey.) The church gave him a 
call to take the pastoral care in February, 1796^ 
but according to his request ordination was defer- 
red until February 1797. The church being in a 
cold state and abounding, with disorders, there 
were no additions^ many excommunications, very 
little decorum, and conferences very thin. Often 
did her young pastor sit in conference with only 
seven or eight members. The few that did attend 
24* 



278 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

endeavored to stir the rest up to a sense of their du= 
ty, but their labors proved almost unsuccessful, and 
often did their pastor have reason to cry, "My 
leanness, my leanness, and who hath believed our 
report;" and would seriously think of giving 
over the pursuit. But being preserved and sup- 
ported by an invisible hand, he held on his way 
through many trials and sore conflicts, looking 
unto the Lord and hoping that God's time to favor 
Zion was not far distant. He was a means to pre- 
vail on some of his brethren (members of different 
<fhurches) to visit each other and pray with and for 
one another, and Zion's God at last heard their 
cries. In the latter part of the year 1800, there 
were several added to the church, and the w 7 grk 
gradually progressed until the spring and summer 
of 1801 and 1802, when the gates of Zion truly 
seemed to be crowded with converts. Ii* order to 
hear all thatwere desirous to tell what they thought 
the Lord had done for their souls, and who wished 
to offer for membership, the charch found it expe- 
dient to divide and sit in two different places in the 
meeting house at the same time; and surely the cry 
of heaven-born souls was then heard in the camps 
of Israel. The congregations were now much 
crowded, and the convicted from all quarters were 
calling on the ministers to pray for them. This 
church in about three years had an addition of 
about 142 members. Elder Biggs served her 
about ten years, then took a dismission from her 
and received the pastoral care of the church at 
Skewarkey. Shortly afterwards, Elder Luke 
Ward joined this church on a letter of dismission 
from the church at Skewarkey, and became her 
pastor and continues in that office until this time. 
The regular meetings of this church are the Satur- 
day before the first Sunday in every monthc 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 279 

FRYING PAN 

Church is situated in the county of Tyrrell, nea* 
a place called the Frying Pan, on the waters of 
Alligator River. She was formerly a branch of 
the church at Mattamuskeet, then under the care 
of Elder John Bray. After Elder Bray left this 
branch, church discipline was little attended to and 
the members retained only so much of the externals 
of religion, as to call each other brother and sister. 
Many members fell into gross sins, so that it could 
not be said that they retained the fellowship of the 
truly pious. When this branch was first gathered 
Robert Sawyer became a member, and being des- 
titute of a minister he exercised his ministerial gifts 
in public. Sometime afterwards he walked disor- 
derly and was not fellowshiped by many of the 
brethren. Church discipline was finally dispensed 
with. In this cold time of religion John Richard- 
son and wife had reason to hope that they had ex- 
perienced a change from nature to grace, and be- 
lieved it their duty to be baptized, but no op- 
portunity offered. Brother Richardson, however, 
used to read Whitfield's sermons to his neighbors. 
About the year 1810, a Baptist preacher from 
Hyde county, by the name of Zepheniah Sawyer, 
visited this neighborhood; and advised those mem- 
bers that desired it, to unite together as Christians 
should. They adopted his advice, formed a con- 
ference, and opened a door for the reception of 
new members, when brother Richardson and wife 
related their experiences and were received and 
baptized. After this they with some others 
petitioned the church in Hyde county, of which 
they were members, for dismission to form a con- 
stituted church in this neighborhood. The same 
was granted, and this church was constituted by 
Elders John Bowin and Zepheniah Sawyer, EI- 



280 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

der Sawyer then took the pastoral care of her. Af- 
ter this the aforesaid Robert Sawyer commenced 
preaching again, and shortly after was ordained to 
the administration of gospel ordinances, but soon 
died. Brother Richardson soon after being bapti- 
zed commenced preaching and was afterwards or<- 
dained by Elders Green Carrowan and James Am- 
brose. After the death of Elder Zepheniah Saw,^ 
yer, this church was successively attended by El- 
ders John Sawyer and James Ambrose. Under 
the ministry of the two last Elders, a considerable 
addition took place. In the year 1812, this church 
became a member of this Association. She had 
then about 48 members, and has been on the de- 
crease ever since. Elder John Richardson attends 
her as occasional pastor. During the year 1830, 
some Baptist ministers came into this neighbor- 
hood proposing to establish new inventions under 
the cloak of religion, which produced great strife 
and contention and caused several excommunica- 
tions from this church. This unhappy cause of 
confusion has not yet become extinct. The stated 
meetings of this church are the Saturday befors 
the third Sunday in every month. 

GOOSE CREEK. 

This church is situated on a creek of the sams 
name in Beaufort county, on the south side of Tar 
River. She was raised up through the instrument 
tali ty of Elder Green Carrowan, who removed into 
this neighborhood from Hyde county. He collec- 
ted a few followers of the Lamb, who united in 
church fellowship and a church was constituted in 
the year 1823, with 17 members. She then call- 
ed on Elder Carrowan to take the pastoral care of 
her, which he accepted and continued to officiate 
therein until his death in 1832. The stated meet^ 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 281 

ings of this church are the Saturday before the 
third Sunday in every month. 

GREAT SWAMP 

Church is situated in Pitt county, about four 
miles north of Greenville. She was formerly a 
branch of the church at Flat Swamp, and was call- 
ed the Tar River branch. Upon petition she was 
dismissed in the year 1795, and shortly afterwards 
constituted and took the name of Great Swamp, 
from a certain water course not far off. She call- 
ed on Elder Noah Tison (who had before been or- 
dained on the itinerant plan) a member of the 
church at Red Banks, in said county, to take the 
pastoral care, which he accepted and served them 
until his death. He was a man much under bodily 
affliction, yet she was not neglected among the fa- 
milies of Israel; for by the zeal of the pastor and 
others, the word was preached and the ordinances 
administered duly. After the death of Elder Ti- 
son, the church called on Elder James Ewell to 
take the pastoral care, who served them for several 
years. Since his death she has been served by El- 
der Luke Ward for some time while living conve- 
nient, and at present the office is supplied by Elder 
Atkinson, 

HUJYTLYG QUARTERS. 

This church was constituted in the year 1832, 
with about 90 members, dismissed from other chur- 
ches. There have been some since dismissed from 
this church to form a church on Cedar Island. 
She is without a settled pastor. This church is 
situated in Carteret county. 

KEHUKEE. 

This church lies in Halifax county. She was 
gathered and constituted with some members who 
had been received and gathered on the free-will 



282 HISTORY <te the KEHUKEE 

plan. Upon being visited by Elders Vanhorne 
and Miller, she was established on the regular or- 
der and joined in covenant in the year 1755. She 
was under the care of that eminent servant of our 
Lord Jesus Christ, Thomas Pope. After the death 
of Elder Pope, she was under the care of Elder 
Meglamre for some years. Elder Meglamre remo- 
ving to Sussex, in Virginia, resigned the pastoral 
concern to Elder William Burgess, who was raised 
in Camden county and called to the ministry while 
in that church. He was brother to the famous 
John Burgess, of that place. Elder Burgess con- 
tinued for a few years to officiate as pastor, and 
until he was called home to rest from his labors* 
The church had now grown very cold and by rea- 
son of deaths, excommunications and removals, 
was greatly decreased in number. Elder Silas 
Mercer occasionally attended her meetings. After 
his removal to Georgia, she was for a while atten- 
ded by Elder Joshua White. After his removal to 
the west, Elder Lemuel Burkitt visited her. 
Since his death she has been attended by Elder 
Joshua Lawrence. This church has gone through 
sundry revolutions, as maybe seen from the minutes 
of this Association; and although she has been 
blessed with many pious members and some able 
ministers, and it being the place where the Associ- 
ation was first held and from which the name was 
derived, yet she has been so greatly reduced at 
some periods, that it was with difficulty conferen- 
ces could be held; yet it is to be hoped that a rich 
harvest is in store for her, and that Elder Law- 
rence's efforts may be succeeded by a numerous in- 
gathering. When this Association was first held 
at Kehukee, it was the third Baptist Association in 
the United Colonies. This church is situated on 
Kehukee creek, not far from Norfleet's ferry, on 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 2B3 

Hoanoke River. Her stated monthly meetings 
are the Saturday before the third Sunday in every 
month. 

LAWRENCE'S MEETING HOUSE. 
This church was formerly a branch of the church 
at Kehukee, but was constituted afterwards; yet 
until the year 1805, they were both represented to- 
gether in the Association; but a committee appoint- 
ed in 1804 to inquire into its standing, it was found 
to have been a constituted church for many years. 
She at that time joined the Association as a new 
member, and was under the pastoral care of Elder 
Joshua Lawrence. When she joined the Associa- 
tion she consisted of ninety members, but by dis- 
missions for new churches, deaths, removals, and 
excommunications, she has been reduced in num- 
bers. Her pastor shows his zeal and faithfulness 
in opposing the new inventions of the day, or any 
other system different from the good old way pre- 
scribed in the scriptures of truth. This church 
was formerly called New, or Cotten's, meeting 
house, and is in Edgecombe county. Her stated 
monthly meetings are the Saturday before the 
fourth Sunday in every month. 

LITTLE ALLIGATOR. 

This church is situated in Tyrrell county, on 
Little Alligator River, or creek, to the east of Co- 
lumbia, on Scuppernong River. She was consti- 
tuted in the year 1824, of members dismissed from 
Scuppernong church, by Elders Micajah and 
James Ambrose, and joined this Association in 
1826s with about 20 members. She has had to 
excommunicate some of her members for advoca- 
ting the new Missionary projects of the day, to the 
disturbance of the peace of the church; but we 
jhope these sources of discord will be of short dura- 



884 HISTORY op the KEHUKEE 

tion, and that brighter days are in store for hen 
Elder James Ambrose served this church for seve- 
ral years as an occasional pastor, and since his 
death Elder Micajah Ambrose has attended her. 



CHAP. X. 

Continuation of the History of the Churches, viz; 
Morattock, Noi'th Creek, North Mattamuskeet, 
Old Ford, Picot meeting house, PowelVs Point 9 
Pungo, Scuppernong, South Mattammkeei, §Jb- 
ivarkey, Smithwick's Creek, Sound Side, Spring 
Green, Tarborough, Washington, White Plains, 
Williams^s meeting house. 

MORATTOCK 

Church is situated in Washington county, near 
a, creek of the same name, and near Plymouth, on 
Roanoke River. This church was first gathered 
through the instrumentality of Elders Silar Mercer 
and John Page, and they were succeeded by Elder 
Martin Ross. A few were connected in church re- 
lation, but like many other churches, she had some 
very unworthy members, which were very trouble- 
some and proved to be a fatal stroke towards her 
downfall; for she in a little time became extinct. 
But a few of her members who delighted in church 
fellowship, became members of the church at Ske- 
warkey, (altho'a great distance) then under the pas- 
toral care of Elder Martin Ross. They endeavored 
to attend there quarterly for sometime until 1791, 
when they petitioned the church for dismission to 
be again constituted, which was granted. They 
were united in a small body, and through a long 
tedious night of coldness and spiritual darkness, 
this church had to appearance only a name to keep 
her alive. She was attended ihen by Elder Ross 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 286 

and until his removal to Yoppim, and was succeed- 
ed by Elder Amariah Biggs. But in the years 
1801 and 1802 she experienced some refreshing 
showers and some additions, so that she called El- 
der Amariah Biggs to take the pastoral care, 
which he accepted and took a letter of dismission 
from the church at Scuppernoag and joined the 
church and continued to officiate as pastor until his 
death in 1827. Since Elder Biggs' death, she has 
been without a settled pastor. She is though serv- 
•ed by Elder Micajah Ambrose. Her stated month- . 
ly meetings are the Saturday before the third Sun- 
day in every month. 

NORTH CREEK. 
This church lies near North Creek, in Bejaufort 
county. Near this place there formerly was a 
church of the free-will order, of which Elder Win- 
field was pastor; but it was the will of divine pro-" 
vidence that the gospel of the free grace of Ggd in 
Christ Jesus should be preached here, and many 
persons embraced the truth and were constituted 
into a church. Elder James McCabe took the 
pastoral care and continued in that office until his 
death in the year 1807. This church was former- 
ly called Pungo, but the name was altered to 
North Creek. For many years past she has been 
under the pastoral care of Elder Lemuel Ross. 
—Some years ago, as may be seen from the min- 
utes of this Association, she got into difficulties and 
the Association appointed a committee to visit her 
and endeavor to restore peace and harmony a- 
mong her members. It was thought by many 
that the labors of this committee would prove abor- 
tive; but we have reason to hope that their efforts 
have proved successful, and that she has now set- 
tled down in love and tranquillity. Her stated 
35 



2SQ HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

monthly meetings are the Saturday before ths, 
fourth Sunday in every month, 

MONTH MATTAMUSKEET 

Church is situated in Hyde county, near Matta- 
niuskeet Lake. There had been a church estab- 
lished at this place some years past, but became 
extinct. Lately the former members, with some 
from South Mattamuskeet, have united and been 
constituted and recently joined this Association. 
—She is now under the pastoral care of Elder 
Asa Sawyer. 

OLD FORD 

Church is situated in the county of Beaufort, a- 
bout six miles north of Washington, and was con- 
stituted of members dismissed from the churches 
at Tranter's Creek, Sroithwick's Creek and Wash- 
ington, in the year 1828, by Elders Joseph Biggs 
and Jeremiah Leggett, with upwards of 20 mem- 
bers. This church has no settled pastor. Elder 
Leggett agreed to attend them as an occasional 
pastor, but he having become enamoured with the 
Armenian tenets, now too prevalent, produced dis- 
cord in the cbnrch and consequently a division. 
The conduct of those who have departed from the 
Articles of Faith on which \he church was consti- 
tuted, has been disapprobated this year by the As- 
sociation. The little few who still adhere to the 
good old way represent theinselves in the Associa- 
tion. 

F1COT MEETING BOUSE. 

This church is situated in the county of Martin, 
about seven m9es .below Williamson* She was 
for some time a branch of the church at Skewar- 
key, and was attended by Elder Joseph Biggs* 
Church discipline was attended to and gospel ordi- 
nances administered, and when ripe for constita- 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 2S7 

Cion she petitioned the church for dismission to form 
a constitution, which was granted. She was con- 
stituted in the year 1827, by Elders James Ros3 
and Joseph Biggs, with upwards of 50 members, 
and joined the ^Association the same year. She 
called on Elder Biggs to serve her as occasional 
pastor, which he accepted and continued to attend 
her until about the year 1831. James Hinson, 
one of her members, has received permission from 
the church to exercise his ministerial gifts. She is 
lately attended by Elder Micajah Perry. Her sta- 
ted meetings are the Saturday before the third Sun- 
day in every month. 

POWELL'S PGLYT. 

This church is situated in the county of Curri- 
tuck, and is of long standing* She was formerly a 
member of the Chowan Association, but in conse- 
quence of the course pursued by that Association, 
in approbating practices which she considered im- 
proper and inconsistent with the correct rule of 
conduct, she resolved to withdraw from that Asso.- 
ciation. She accordingly done so, and in 1831 
applied for admission and was received a member 
of this Association with about 20 members. This 
church is destitute of a settled pastor, and is treat- 
ed with contumely by many of those from whom 
she has withdrawn; yet she may and does antici- 
pate the realization of that promise which secures 
blessings to those who continue faithful in contend- 
ing for the true faith and practice. 

PUNGO 

Church is situated near the head of Pungo River, 
in Beaufort county. She was constituted in the 
year 1824, with members dismissed from North 
Creek church, and joined the Association in 182c, 



^SS HISTORY op the EEHUKEE 

with 15 members. She has been troubled with 
the preaching of the new doctrines of general 
atonement, &c. which has produced some dissen- 
tion among her members, and to restore peace and 
harmony she has been compelled to excommuni- 
cate several members. She is without a pastor, 
and although she has but few members yet among 
them are some who earnestly contend for the faith 
once delivered to the saints. This church is sur- 
rounded with water courses and swamps, and con* 
sequently is not often visited by travelling minis- 
ters. 

SCUPPERNONG 
Church is situated in Tyrrell county, not far 
from Scuppernong River. Some of the first min- 
isters of our order who preached in this part of the 
Lord's vineyard, were Elders John Page, John 
Slancill, and Silas Mercer, and their labors were 
blessed. Several persons were baptized, formed 
into a church and constituted about the year 1785. 
Sometime afterwards Elder Nathan Gilbert, one of 
her members, preached for her. Elder Amariah 
Biggs had the pastoral care of this church for some 
time. About the year 1802, he took a letter of 
dismission from, her and became pastor of the 
church at Morattock. She was then for many 
years without a settled pastor, but was frequently 
served by Elders Amariah Biggs, James Ambrose, 
and Micajah Ambrose. By dismissions for new 
churches her number has been much reduced. 
Recently the Lord has raised up one of her mem- 
bers to the work of the ministry by the name of 
Joseph Barnes, whose gifts are promising and who 
has taken the pastoral care. While this church 
was in a cold and reduced situation the meeting 
house went to decay, but it is now repaired and 
the prospect of better times in religion seems flat- 
tering. She is troubled considerably with Mis- 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 2QD 

sionary and Armenian Baptists, but it is hoped that 
this old church by her young members will ear- 
nestly contend for the faith once delivered to the 
saints. 

SOUTH MATTrfMUSKEET. 
This church is. situated in Hyde county, near a 
Lake of that name. The manner and by whom 
this church was gathered we have not been inform- 
ed, but in the year 1802 she was under the pasto- 
ral cafe of Elder VViiiiam Carrowan, and consisted 
of about 60 members. We learn that after the 
death of Elder Carrowan, she was served by Elder 
John Br$y. Elder Green Carrowan,, son of Elder 
William Carrowan, was raised up to the ministry 
in this church and ordained to the administration 
of gospel ordinances. He took the pastoral care 
of her and continued in the discharge of that office 
until he moved into Beaufort county and gathered 
a church on Goose Creek. Lately she is supplied 
with preaching by Elder George W. Carrowan, 
brother of Elder Green, who is a young man of 
promising talents, and has accepted the pastoral 
care. Her stated monthly meetings are the Satur- 
day before the first Sunday in every month. 

8KEWARKEY. 

This church is situated in the county of Martin, 
about one and half miles from Williamston. She 
was originally a branch of the church at Flat 
Swamp, then under the care of Elder John Page, 
who visited this branch for several years, and un- 
der whose ministry the cause of religion flourish- 
ed. Sometime afterwards the Lord called to the 
work of the ministry Martin Ross, one of the mem- 
bers of this branch. The members subsequently 
petitioned the church for dismission to form a con- 
stitution. After some delay it Was granted, and 
25* 



290 HISTORY op the KEHDKEE 

she was constituted by Elders Lemuel Burkitt and 
John Page, and her young preacher ordained in 
1787. For several years she had some additions, 
but like other churches a time of coldness came on 
and she experienced a considerable portion, altho' 
her pastor served her regularly and preached a great 
deal elsewhere. About 1791, some members in 
the neighborhood or Morattock, petitioned for a 
letter of dismission to form a church at that place. 
In the year 1796, Elder Ross took a letter of dis- 
mission to join the church at Yoppim, and at the 
same time Joseph Biggs, a young member, took a 
letter of dismission to join the church at Flat 
Swamp. It was with reluctance they were grant- 
ed, as she was then stripped of ministerial gifts. 
She therefore groaned under her afflictions until 
the kind hand of Providence favored her in raising 
up Elder Luke Ward, a member of said church, to 
the work of the ministry. In the year 1799, he 
was ordained by Elders Joseph Biggs and Amari- 
ah Biggs. The Lord has been pleased to raise up 
to the work of the ministry many in this church, 
(viz:) Martin Ross, Aaron Spivey, Joseph Biggs, 
Luke Ward, Abram Tice, Harrell Cherry, John 
Bennett, James Daniel, John Tice, and John Ward. 
In the year 1803, thirty-four members were dis- 
missed from this church to form one at JSmith- 
wick's Creek, and about the same time about 20 
more were dismissed to form a church at Tranter's 
Creek. In the year 1827, she dismissed about 50 
members to form a church at Picot meeting house, 
and also upwards of 20 memberssto form a constitu- 
tion at Beargrass. About the _year 1806, Elder 
Luke .Ward took a letter of dismission and joined 
the church at Flat Swamp; and about the same 
Jime Elder Joseph Biggs joined this church on a 
letter of dismission from the church at Flat Swamp, 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 291 

and took the pastoral care in which he continues to 
officiate up to the present time. After Elder Biggs 
took the pastoral care, the church was in a very 
cold condition and much reduced in numbers. By 
death she had lost her deacons and clerk, and El- 
der Biggs had to officiate as minister, deacon and 
clerk. In the year 1816, this church experienced 
some additions and continued more or less for ma- 
ny years, yet at present religion in her bounds is 
rather dull, but if is hoped may ere long be revived 
to the benefit of many. Although many ministers 
have been raised up in this church, yet Elder 
Biggs is now destitute of assistance except by El- 
der John Ward, who was not long since ordained." 
The stated meetings of this church are the Satur- 
day before the second Sunday in every month. 

SMITHWICK'S CREEK 

Church is situated in the county of Martin, be- 
tween Wiiliamston and Washington. She was 
formerly a branch of the church at Skewarkey and 
was attended by Elder Joseph Biggs. The meet- 
ings were held at the house of brother Joshua Ro- 
bason, where several members were received and 
baptized by Elder Biggs. A sufficient number 
having been received, they petitioned the church 
for dismission to form a constitution, which was 
granted and they were constituted into a church at 
brother Robason's. About the year 1803 or 1804, 
they built them a meeting house on Hay's branch, 
between two prongs of Smithwick's Creek, from 
which the church derived her name, and called on 
Elder Joseph Biggs to serve them as occasional pas- 
tor, which he consented to do until about the year 
1820 Abram Tice, a member of this church, ex- 
ercised a ministerial gift but was never ordained to 
the administration of gospel ordinances. Some 
years past, Hosea Lanier, a member of this churchy 



293 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

after preaching several years, was ordained by El- 
ders Joseph Biggs and Luke Ward; and although 
the church requested him, he never consented to 
take the pastoral care of her. He however served 
her in preaching and administering ordinances un- 
til about the years 1827 or 1828, when he took a 
letter of dismission from her and removed to the 
State of Tennessee and settled on Hatchie River. 
A few years past Humphrey Stalling* and JMica- 
jah Perry, both members of this church, commen- 
ced preaching, and being approved of by the 
church, they were at her request ordained on the 
itinerant plan by Eiders Joseph Biggs and Lemuel 
Ross. This church, since Elder Lanier left her, 
has been served by Jeremiah Leggett as occasional 
pastor, and for two or three years past unhappy 
differences have taken place, he having embraced 
the Armenian tenets and with the assistance of 
others led several of the members into error. A 
division accordingly took place in the church, and 
the number who still adhere to the creed and Arti- 
cles of Faith on which she was constituted, repre- 
sent themselves in our Association. The others 
may be truly considered "without form and void." 
The stated meetings of this chureh are the Saturday 
before the fourth Sunday in every month. 

SOUND SIDE. 

This church is situated in Tyrrell county, on 
Albemarle Sound, from which the name is deriv- 
ed. She was constituted mostly of members from 
Scuppernong church in the year 1S24, by Elders 
Micajah Ambrose and James Ambrose. She join- 
ed the Association the same year with 27 mem- 
bers. She called on Elder James A mbrose to lake 
the care as occasional pastor, which he accepted 
and continued to serve her until his death, which 
took place in the year 1830. Since hisr death she 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 29^ 

Has been attended by Klder Micajah Ambrose as 
occasional pastor. This church has had her peace 
much disturbed by Missionary agents and Armeni- 
an Baptists. 

SPRING GREEN 

Church is situated in Martin county, about nirre 
miles north-west of Williamston. She was con- 
stituted in the year 181 1, with about 17 members, 
who were dismissed from some of the adjacent 
churches. Shortly after her constitution she call- 
ed on Elder William Hyman to serve her as occa- 
sional pastor, which he accepted and continued to 
do until John *Tice removed into the neighbor- 
hood of this church and became a member thereof, 
on a letter of dismission from the church at Ske- 
warkey. He had been preaching for some time 
by permission from the church at Skewarkey, and 
after joining this church she called him to take the 
pastoral care, which he accepted and was accord- 
ingly ordained lo the administration of gospel or- 
dinances. In the year 1828, however, he was ex- 
communicated for immoral conduct. He subse- 
quently applied for restoration but was not receiv- 
ed, and he then removed to the southward where 
we understand he is attempting to preach. Since 
his expulsion the church has been served in prea- 
ching and the administration of gospel ordinances 
by Elders William Hyman, Luke Ward, and Jo- 
seph Biggs. The stated meetings of this church 
are the Saturday before the fourth Sunday in every 
month. 

TARBOROVGH 

Church is situated in the town of Tarborough, in 
the county of Edgecombe. For a number %[ years 
before the constitution of this church, the people of 
this place were much blessed with the preaching of 
the gospel by ministers of several denominations. 
A few Baptists resided here and an attempt was 



294 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

made by that eminent servant of Christ, Elder Na- 
than Gilbert, to form a church, but he failed in con- 
sequence of not procuring the consent of but two 
or three members to leave the churches to whom 
they belonged. Subsequently Elder Joshua Law- 
rence frequently visited this place and preached. 
About two years before the constitution of this 
church, Elder Lawrence has been heard to say that 
h£ was powerfully impressed with this passage of 
scripture: "And God is able of these stones to 
raise up children unto Abraham." He renewed 
his ministerial exertions and commenced preaching 
here monthly, and shortly after* this the church 
was formed. She was constituted with only six 
members, on the 7th of February, 1819, by Eiders 
Joshua Lawrence, Martin Ross, Thomas Billings, 
and Thomas Meredith. Elder Lawrence consent- 
ed to preach for them, and in a few years by let- 
ters of dismission from other churches and baptism 
her number increased to about 40 members. The 
church enjoyed great peace and harmony, mutual 
love and fellpwship. When Elder Lawrence first 
preached at this place, he found some difficulty in 
procuring a house for public worship; frequently 
having to preach in a joiner's shop belonging to 
Mr, Mc Williams, and at other times in the Acade- 
my. This, however, was obviated by the liberali- 
ty of the brethren and citizens of the place, who 
contributed to the erection of a meeting house. 
The brotherly love of this church was, however, 
subjected to an unhappy concussion, which we fear 
will never be restored among the members compo- 
sing her at that time. About 1826 or 1827, seri- 
ous threats were made against Elder Lawrence's 
life, and he was warned by two or three messages 
in one week not to come to town the succeeding 
Saturday to his appointment, as his life would be 
in danger. He, however, went and preached to 



o 



BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 295 

the church and people, speaking his mind freely, 
and followed the direction of Jesus, "When they 
persecute you in one city flee you into another;" 
and as Paul and Barnabas shook off the dust of 
their feet, and departed. Elder Lawrence then 
left the church for six or eight months, to the 
great grief of many and has never preached in that 
meeting house since. During the time Elder Law- 
rence absented himself, the church sailed on Elder 
P. W. Dowd, of Raleigh, to preach for them. The 
difficulties in this church arose in consequence of 
some of her members, with softie of the visiting 
ministers being members of the Masonic Society, 
frequenting the Lodges and parades to the grief of 
many of the pious followers of the Lamb. And 
another great source of discord was the course pur- 
sursued by Missionary advocates. In a short time 
parties were formed, and the most unpleasant oc- 
currences took place. The advocates of the new 
system and inventions, thinking themselves strong 
enough, took charge and possession of the new 
meeting house which had been erected, and exclu- 
ded those who were opposed to their measures. 
The members adhering to the old rule of practice, 
(to wit:) the scriptures, and discountenancing any 
scheme that conflicted with it, assembled at the old 
meeting house and acting in a church capacity callr 
edon the others as having acted disorderly; which 
they refused to attend to, and they excommunica- 
ted several of them from the privileges of The 
church. Those who assembled at the new meet- 
ing house assumed the same authority, and dealt 
with the others in the same manner. The latter, 
we understand, has become a member of the Neuse 
Association, finding, we suppose, kindred spkits 
4here; while the former still represents herself in 
the Kehukee. Both cannot be legitimate church- 
es, and awful must be the curse that awaits thase 



296 HISTORY of the KEHUKEE 

who have severed the uniiy and brotherly love of 
this church. Elder Lawrence attends the old churcbc 

WASHINGTON 

Church is situated in the town of Washington, in 
the county of Beaufort. She was constituted with 
about 21 members from the church at Tranter's 
Creek, in the year 1822, by Elders Joseph Biggs 
and Jeremiah Mastin, and joined the Association 
the same year. At the time of her constitution* 
she called on Elder Mastin (he having been before 
ordained on the itinerant plan) to take the pastoral 
charge, which he accepted and officiated therein 
until his death in 1S25, at which time she consist- 
ed of about 60 members. Since the death of El- 
der Mastin she has had no settled pastor. She has 
a branch about six miles below Washington, called 
the Beaver Dam, where most of her members at- 
tend and the business of the church is transacted. 
In this branch brother Miles Everitt has been rai- 
sed up to the ministry, and has been ordained to 
the administration of gospel ordinances on the itin- 
erant plan. He has since taken a letter of dismis- 
sion from this church and become pastor of the 
church at White Plains. The monthly meetings 
of this church are the Saturday before ihe third 
Sunday in every month. 

WHITE PLAINS. 

This church is situated in the county of Beaufort, 
between the towns of Washington and Plymouth. 
She was constituted of members dismissed from the 
branch of the Washington church at the Beaver 
Dam. She called on one of her members, Miles 
Everitt, who had been ordained on the itinerant 
plan, to take the pastoral care of her; which he ac- 
cepted and still continues in that office. She was 
received into the Association in the year l£26j 



BAPTIST ASSCIATION- 297 

with about 20 members. The stated meetings of 
this church are the Saturday before the first Sun- 
day in every month. 

WILLIAMS'S MEETING HOUSE. 
This church joined the Association in the year 
1809, with 35 members, and is situated in the coun- 
ty of Edgecombe. This church was originally 
called Prospect Chapel, but in the year 1811 it was 
thought best to remove it to another situation, and 
it was then called Williams's meeting house, the 
land having been given by Mr. John Williams. 
This church was constituted on Thursday before 
the fourth Sunday in August, 1804, by Elders Mo- 
ses Bennett and Philemon Bennett, with members 
dismissed from Fishing Creek. After being con- 
stituted, she called Elder Philemon Bennett to 
serve her as occasional pastor, which he accepted 
and attended her until the year 1820. Under El- 
der Bennett ? s ministry she experienced prosperous 
times, and in 1811 a revival took place in this 
church and about 110 were added by baptism, 
After this revival she continued stationary for sev- 
eral years. There have been two brethren mem- 
bers of this church who have exercised their min- 
isterial gifts in public, (viz:) John George and 
James Ellanor, but the church did not think pro- 
per to encourage ti*em much; although the for- 
mer particularly was very remarkable for a pious 
and exemplary life. After Elder Philemon Ben- 
nett failed to serve her ? she called on Elder Mark 
H. Bennett to attend her as occasional pastor,- 
which he consented to do and has continued to of- 
ficiate in that capacity to this time. Thenumber. 
of white male members in this church are few. 
Her staled meetings are the Saturday before tbS 
third Sunday in every month. 
26 



SUBSCRIBERS' NAMES, 

And Counties where residing. 



BEAUFORT. 
Able Wei 
Bailey Richard 
Bailey Thomas A 
Barrow Frederick D 
Barrow Thomas 2 
Barrow William T 
Blount Henry 3 

Blount 

Carter Solomon 
Cerms Jacob 
Clark Joseph H 
Clark Samuel 3 
Cousins John 
Crowell William 
Culpepper William 
Davis Henry L 
Davis Henry Jr 
Davis John*R 3 
Davis Richard 
Dean Jesse 
Everitt James G 
Everitt Miles 
Gaskol IVoah 6 
Gorham G 
Graidles Redden 
Haborn John 
Hardison Hance 
Harris Geo 
.Hodges James 
Hodges John 
HoMewell Michael 
Hooten John A 
Jacson jsaac 
Jor.t3n John S 
Leggitt John A 
Oden Asa 
Perry William 
Price William 
Price William H 
Ratcliff William 
Ro?s Lemuel 
Ross Martin 
Simpson Isaac 



Singleton David 
Sinaw William 6 
Wallace Levin 
Wilkerson Jacob 2 
Wilkerson John 
Wilkins William 
Wilkinson Daniel 
Wilkison Aaron 
Wilkison Hosea 
Wilson Mercer D 6 
Windley John 
Wolles Jonathan 

CARTERET, 

Daniels Josiah 
Daniels Randolph 
Davis John 
Day Thomas 12 
Goodwin Wright 
Robards John 
RobasonThos Sen 6 
Robertson Thos 3 
Smith William Jr 
Styron John 
Styron Jorge 
Styron Lemuel 
Styron Richard 
Styron William 

CURRITUCK. 
Baxter Joshua 
Melson James 12 
Spence Carey 

TatumMaxamiliana4 Garrett John 
Gatlin Thos D 

EDGECOMBE. 
Armstrong Gra\ 2 
Atkinson Theo 



Batts Lucy 

Bennett Mark 12 

Bond Lewis 

Bradley David 4 

Bradlev James 

Bradley Willis 

Brady Sarah 

Brake Daniel 

Brake Dorris 

Brown Reuben 

Bryan Robert 

Bynum Turner 
Carney Richard 

Cherry Lunsford R 
Cherry Theo 
Cherry Thos B 
Cobb Eaton 
Cobb John 
Cobb Ollen 
Cotten Randolph 2 
Crisp Whitley 
Cutchin Norfleet 
Daniel John H 6 
Daniel J P 
Dicken Ben 
Eagles R T 
Ellinor James 
Eliinor Josiah 
Ellis Jonathan 
Ellis E H 
Everett Silas 
Freeman Josiah 
Garrett Henry W 



Barlow A K 
Barnes John-W 
Barnes Reddick 
Barron James 
Battle Joseph S 13 
Batts Benjamin. 



George James ~ 
Glover John 
Gray Etheldred 
Hardy Jordan 
Harrell Cathedal 
Harrison Richard 
Hines Peter 
Hays Jesse 
Home CasweU 



SUBSCRIBERS' names. 



299 



Hopkins Daniel 
Hopkins George W 
Hopkins Henry A 
Hopkins Jarrett 
Hopkins William D 
Howell Briltain 
H >well Irvin 
Johnston Catharine 
Johnston Henry 
Jones Frederick 
Jones James 
KillebrewG \V 
King Coffieid6 
King Sarah 
Knight C C 
Knight Gariot 
Knight James 
Knight Jesse C 
Knight Jordan 
Knight Peter E 
Knight Willis 
Knox Henry 
Lawrence's M H 12 
Lawrence Joshua 12 
Lawrence Josiah 
Lawrence Peter P 
Leggett Noah 
Leigh William C 
Lewis Richard H 
Little Frederick 
Long William R 2 
McDowell Patrick 
Mercer John 
Mercer William 
Moore John R 
Morgan Henry 
Parker Weeks Jr 
Pender Elizabeth 
Pender Joshua 
Pender William 
Petway William D 
Philips James J 
Pippen Jos Jno 12 
Pitt Jo P 
Pitt John 

Porter Benjamin P 
Porter Ely J2 
Price William 
Richards Danford 
Savage Lemuel 



Savidge Alston 
Sessuras Nathan 
Sharpe Benjamin 
Shirley Geraldus 
Shirley Mrs 
Ssrey Robert 2 
Stallings James 2 
Siallings Jesse 
Staton Roderick 
Staton W infield D 
Thigpen Job 
Thigpen William 6 
Thomas Wilson 
Ward Luke 6 
Weaver Benjamin 
Weddt-ll Matthew 
Wiggins Elisha 
Wilkins John W 
Wilkins Willis 
Wilkinson Benjamin 
Wilkinson Charles 
Wiileford Meedy 
Williams David 
W T ooten William 

HALIFAX. 

Applewhite Elisha 
Atkinson Joel 
Bass John 
Bell John 
Bell John B 
Bishop Arthur 
Bishop John 
Brewer Turner 
Dew Allen 
Dicken L B K 
Godwin Thomas 
Gray Thos W 
Higgs Joseph 
Higgs Sarah 
Higgs Willie 
Kea John 
Lyon H L 
Moran Henry 
Pender James 
Pittman Dempsey 
Pittman F R 
Pore Lit 
Powell Jo? J W 
Rutland Turner 



Shield Charles 
Shield John 
Stampire John A 
Staton Baker 
Webb Willis 
Whitehead William 
Young General 
Young James 

HYDE. 

Allcock William 
Bell Ebenezer 
Benson Carrowan 
Berrie Ezekiel 
Berry John 
Boomer William 
Bradie Peter 
Bridgman Green 
Bridgman J oseph 
Bridgman Lancaster 
Bridgman Thcmas 2 
Carrowan Marian 
Carrowan Wash'n 2 
Cridle Daniel 
Cutreall William 
English Bryan 
Fodry Hugh H 
Garkins Benj 
Gaskill Cory 
Harcklin Andrew 
Harris Cason 
Harris Ezekiel 
Harris Josiah 
Harris Zabez K 
Hudson Elijah 
Jarvis A B 
Jarvis Julia 
Jarvis Lydia 
Jordan John 
Lucas Jesse B 
Mason Allen 
Mason John 
May Jos S 
Maye Jo?eph D 
McGownd James 
Midge tt Levy 
Moore Nancv T 
Moore RMG 
Neal Willis 
Roie Reuben 



300 



subscribers' names. 



Sadler Samuel 
Sadler Thomas 
Swindell A B 
Swindell Emery 
Swindell Wade Jr 
Tooley George Sen 
Tuley Ormond 
Windley Timothy 

MARTIN. 

Airs Richard 
Bailey Warner G 
Barden John 
Biggs Daniel 2 
Biggs Joseph D 
Biggs Thomas 
Biggs Warren 
Bowers Lewelling 
Bryan John 2 
Davis Elizabeth 
Gray William 
Gre«n Ma'achi 
Griffin Matthew 
Haislep Joiin 
Hassell C B 6 
Heathcock Burrell 
Howell Levi 
Johnston Amos 
Johnston John 
Jol'ey Jesse Jr 
Joyner Whitney 
Leggitt Bithel 
Liiley Daniel 
Mayo James 18 
Mayo Thomas 
Mizle Elizabeth 
Moore Josephus 
Moore Samuel 
Nowil) Lemuel 
Outterbridge Ste'n 
Feal Abram 
Fender John 
Ferry John 
Ferry Micajah 
Phillips Thomas H 
Rascoe Thomas W 



Reddick Thomas Sen 
Rogerson William 
Short Henry 
Sprewell Emri 
Stallins Humphrey 
Summers William 
Teal James 
Ward John 
Ward William W r 
Wheatley Thomas 
Whitaker Isom 
Woollard David 

NASH. 
Barnes Bennet 2 
Barnes James 
Battle Amos J 6 
Battle James S 48 
Battle Jesse 6 
Brake Daniel 
Brake Jesse 
Drake J H 
Gay Eaton 
Hsnes Lewis 
Lamkin P W 
Lane Lamen 
Pope Dempsey 
Ricks Willie 2 
Rose Richard 
Manning Exam 

PITT. 
Andrews Edmund 6 
Atkinson John A 
Brown John S 
Buck Nancy 
Bymim Benjamin 6 
Daniel Josiah 2 
Dupree Thomas 
2 Eason Demsey S 
Eason Nancy 
Fleming W'illis 
Gay Ely 
Gorham John C 
Griffin Lanear 
Herrington J D 



Highsmith James 
Hollerday Samuel 
Lawrence David 
Moore Edmund 
Moore Jesse 
Parker Hardy G 
Rives Richard E 
Short Lydia 
Stancill Caswel 
Whichard Hardy 
Whichard John 

TYRRELL. 
Alexander Geo H 
Brickhouse Benj 
Brickhouse Gilbert 
Brickhouse M P 
Kemp Zebulon 
Meekins Isaac 
Swain Abram jJ 

WASHINGTON. 

Ambrose Micajah r 

Bowen Levin 
Brount Charles 
Corpew Malachi 
Deavenport James 
Mizle Durant 
Murry Silas 
Wilkerson Jacob 

Gilbert John G Spar- 
ta Geo 12 

Residence unknown* 
Ball William 
Dance Henry 2 
Gee James 
Harper David 
Holleway Nathan 2 
Joyner Moses 
Perry W r iliiam B 
Potter James 2 
Powell Wiley 
Sutherland Sim- 
mons 6, 



91 



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